1258

How can I sort this array by the value of the "order" key?

Even though the values are currently sequential, they will not always be.

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [hashtag] => a7e87329b5eab8578f4f1098a152d6f4
            [title] => Flower
            [order] => 3
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [hashtag] => b24ce0cd392a5b0b8dedc66c25213594
            [title] => Free
            [order] => 2
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [hashtag] => e7d31fc0602fb2ede144d18cdffd816b
            [title] => Ready
            [order] => 1
        )
)
2

14 Answers 14

1929

Try a usort. If you are still on PHP 5.2 or earlier, you'll have to define a sorting function first:

function sortByOrder($a, $b) {
    return $a['order'] - $b['order'];
}

usort($myArray, 'sortByOrder');

Starting in PHP 5.3, you can use an anonymous function:

usort($myArray, function($a, $b) {
    return $a['order'] - $b['order'];
});

And finally with PHP 7 you can use the spaceship operator:

usort($myArray, function($a, $b) {
    return $a['order'] <=> $b['order'];
});

To extend this to multi-dimensional sorting, reference the second/third sorting elements if the first is zero - best explained below. You can also use this for sorting on sub-elements.

usort($myArray, function($a, $b) {
    $retval = $a['order'] <=> $b['order'];
    if ($retval == 0) {
        $retval = $a['suborder'] <=> $b['suborder'];
        if ($retval == 0) {
            $retval = $a['details']['subsuborder'] <=> $b['details']['subsuborder'];
        }
    }
    return $retval;
});

If you need to retain key associations, use uasort() - see comparison of array sorting functions in the manual.

1
  • If you need fallback/tiebreaker sorting without any function calls to prepare values, then declare an array of rules on both sides of a single spaceship operator. 1 2 If subsequent sorting rules incorporate functional overhead, then use the ?: (ternary operator) between subsequent spaceship operator comparisons. 3 so that no extra functions are unnecessarily called. – mickmackusa Dec 7 '20 at 22:17
291
function aasort (&$array, $key) {
    $sorter = array();
    $ret = array();
    reset($array);
    foreach ($array as $ii => $va) {
        $sorter[$ii] = $va[$key];
    }
    asort($sorter);
    foreach ($sorter as $ii => $va) {
        $ret[$ii] = $array[$ii];
    }
    $array = $ret;
}

aasort($your_array, "order");
3
  • 3
    This answer is missing its educational explanation. – mickmackusa Dec 7 '20 at 21:32
  • A loop, then a native sort, then another loop? Certainly not the most elegant or performant snippet on the page. – mickmackusa Dec 7 '20 at 22:03
  • An explanation would be in order. – Peter Mortensen Jun 6 at 22:34
283

I use this function:

function array_sort_by_column(&$arr, $col, $dir = SORT_ASC) {
    $sort_col = array();
    foreach ($arr as $key => $row) {
        $sort_col[$key] = $row[$col];
    }

    array_multisort($sort_col, $dir, $arr);
}

array_sort_by_column($array, 'order');

Edit This answer is at least ten years old, and there are likely better solutions now, but I am adding some extra info as requested in a couple of comments.

It works because array_multisort() can sort multiple arrays. Example input:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [hashtag] => a7e87329b5eab8578f4f1098a152d6f4
            [title] => Flower
            [order] => 3
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [hashtag] => b24ce0cd392a5b0b8dedc66c25213594
            [title] => Free
            [order] => 2
        )

First $sort_col is made which is an two dimensional array with the values being what we want to sort by and the keys matching the input array. For example for this input, choosing key $sort_col "order" we get:

Array
(
    [0] => 3,
    [1] => 2
)

array_multisort() then sorts that array (resulting in key order 1, 0) but this is only the two dimensional array. So the original input array is also passed as the $rest argument. As the keys match it will be sorted so its keys are also in the same order, giving the desired result.

Note:

  • it is passed by reference so that the supplied array is modified in place.
  • array_multisort() can sort multiple additional array like this, not just one
3
  • 1
    This answer is missing its educational explanation. – mickmackusa Dec 7 '20 at 21:32
  • An explanation would be in order. E.g., what is the idea/gist? What are the tradeoffs compared to other solutions? What are the performance characteristics, both theoretical and actual examples performance measurements? For instance, is this solution dog slow or not? – Peter Mortensen Jun 6 at 22:36
  • @PeterMortensen thanks I added some info – Tom Haigh Jun 21 at 16:43
80

I usually use usort, and pass my own comparison function. In this case, it is very simple:

function compareOrder($a, $b)
{
  return $a['order'] - $b['order'];
}
usort($array, 'compareOrder');

In PHP 7 using the spaceship operator:

usort($array, function($a, $b) {
    return $a['order'] <=> $b['order'];
});
0
78

One approach to achieve this would be like this

$new = [
    [
        'hashtag' => 'a7e87329b5eab8578f4f1098a152d6f4',
        'title' => 'Flower',
        'order' => 3,
    ],
    [
        'hashtag' => 'b24ce0cd392a5b0b8dedc66c25213594',
        'title' => 'Free',
        'order' => 2,
    ],
    [
        'hashtag' => 'e7d31fc0602fb2ede144d18cdffd816b',
        'title' => 'Ready',
        'order' => 1,
    ],
];
$keys = array_column($new, 'order');
array_multisort($keys, SORT_ASC, $new);
var_dump($new);

Result:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [hashtag] => e7d31fc0602fb2ede144d18cdffd816b
            [title] => Ready
            [order] => 1
        )
    [1] => Array
        (
            [hashtag] => b24ce0cd392a5b0b8dedc66c25213594
            [title] => Free
            [order] => 2
        )
    [2] => Array
        (
            [hashtag] => a7e87329b5eab8578f4f1098a152d6f4
            [title] => Flower
            [order] => 3
        )
)
1
  • 3
    @aju This answer is missing its educational explanation. – mickmackusa Dec 7 '20 at 21:33
22

To sort the array by the value of the "title" key, use:

uasort($myArray, function($a, $b) {
    return strcmp($a['title'], $b['title']);
});

strcmp compare the strings.

uasort() maintains the array keys as they were defined.

1
  • This answer is ignoring the OP's requirements. The question asks how to sort on the order column. Regardless, the spaceship operator (demonstrated in the accepted answer) performs this same comparison without making iterated function calls. – mickmackusa Dec 7 '20 at 22:01
19

Use array_multisort(), array_map()

array_multisort(array_map(function($element) {
      return $element['order'];
  }, $array), SORT_ASC, $array);

print_r($array);

DEMO

3
  • Note that this approach will emit a notice. array_multisort references it’s first parameter. – Kami Yang Apr 22 '20 at 11:42
  • @Kami there is no evidence of your claim in the ready-made demo link. I wouldn't use this answer because array_column() is more appropriate/concise. – mickmackusa Nov 20 '20 at 11:28
  • This is a less-refined version of ajuchacko91's earlier posted answer. – mickmackusa Dec 7 '20 at 21:37
17
$sort = array();
$array_lowercase = array_map('strtolower', $array_to_be_sorted);
array_multisort($array_lowercase, SORT_ASC, SORT_STRING, $alphabetically_ordered_array);

This takes care of both upper and lower case alphabets.

2
  • 5
    How does this answer the question of sorting by a particular array key? – Sean H Aug 16 '16 at 8:41
  • @Nitro This answer is missing its educational explanation. This answer appears to be the correct answer to a different question. – mickmackusa Dec 7 '20 at 21:34
6

The most flexible approach would be using this method:

Arr::sortByKeys(array $array, $keys, bool $assoc = true): array

Here's why:

  • You can sort by any key (also nested like 'key1.key2.key3' or ['k1', 'k2', 'k3'])

  • It works both on associative and not associative arrays ($assoc flag)

  • It doesn't use references - it returns a new sorted array

In your case it would be as simple as:

$sortedArray = Arr::sortByKeys($array, 'order');

This method is a part of this library.

2

If anyone needs sort according to a key, the best is to use the below:

usort($array, build_sorter('order'));

function build_sorter($key) {
   return function ($a, $b) use ($key) {
      return strnatcmp($a[$key], $b[$key]);
   };
}
1
1

This solution is for usort() with an easy-to-remember notation for multidimensional sorting. The spaceship operator <=> is used, which is available from PHP 7.

usort($in,function($a,$b){
  return $a['first']   <=> $b['first']  //first asc
      ?: $a['second']  <=> $b['second'] //second asc
      ?: $b['third']   <=> $a['third']  //third desc (a b swapped!)
      //etc
  ;
});

Examples:

$in = [
  ['firstname' => 'Anton', 'surname' => 'Gruber', 'birthdate' => '03.08.1967', 'rank' => 3],
  ['firstname' => 'Anna', 'surname' => 'Egger', 'birthdate' => '04.01.1960', 'rank' => 1],
  ['firstname' => 'Paul', 'surname' => 'Mueller', 'birthdate' => '15.10.1971', 'rank' => 2],
  ['firstname' => 'Marie', 'surname' => 'Schmidt ', 'birthdate' => '24.12.1963', 'rank' => 2],
  ['firstname' => 'Emma', 'surname' => 'Mueller', 'birthdate' => '23.11.1969', 'rank' => 2],
];

First task: Order By rank asc, surname asc

usort($in,function($a,$b){
  return $a['rank']      <=> $b['rank']     //first asc
      ?: $a['surname']   <=> $b['surname']  //second asc
  ;
});

Second task: Order By rank desc, surname asc, firstmame asc

usort($in,function($a,$b){
  return $b['rank']      <=> $a['rank']       //first desc
      ?: $a['surname']   <=> $b['surname']    //second asc
      ?: $a['firstname'] <=> $b['firstname']  //third asc
  ;
});

Third task: Order By rank desc, birthdate asc

The date cannot be sorted in this notation. It is converted with strtotime.

usort($in,function($a,$b){
  return $b['rank']      <=> $a['rank']       //first desc
      ?: strtotime($a['birthdate']) <=> strtotime($b['birthdate'])    //second asc
  ;
});
1

You could use usort and a user-defined sort function with a callback function:

usort($new, fn($a, $b) => $a['order'] - $b['order']);

TRICK: you could use a > b or a - b or a <=> b for sorting in an ascending order. For a descending order just the swap position of a and b.

1
  • Do all these options result in a stable sort? – Peter Mortensen Jun 6 at 22:46
0

Let's face it: PHP does not have a simple out-of-the box function to properly handle every array sort scenario.

This routine is intuitive, which means faster debugging and maintenance:

// Automatic population of the array
$tempArray = array();
$annotations = array();
// ... some code
// SQL $sql retrieves result array $result
// $row[0] is the ID, but is populated out of order (comes from
// multiple selects populating various dimensions for the same DATE
// for example
while($row = mysql_fetch_array($result)) {
    $needle = $row[0];
    arrayIndexes($needle);  // Create a parallel array with IDs only
    $annotations[$needle]['someDimension'] = $row[1]; // Whatever
}
asort($tempArray);
foreach ($tempArray as $arrayKey) {
    $dataInOrder = $annotations[$arrayKey]['someDimension'];
    // .... more code
}

function arrayIndexes ($needle) {
    global $tempArray;
    if (!in_array($needle, $tempArray)) {
        array_push($tempArray, $needle);
    }
}
4
  • 6
    "Let's face it: php does NOT have a simple out of the box function to properly handle every array sort scenario." That's exactly what usort/ksort/asort are designed for ^^' – benftwc Apr 23 '18 at 13:19
  • 5
    Actually PHP has a lot of sorting functions that can be used to handle every array sort scenario. – axiac May 29 '18 at 16:31
  • 1
    With regard to debugging and maintenance, the use of global is a huge red flag and is generally discouraged. Why is mysql_fetch_array being demonstrated for this question instead of the OP's source array, and that there is no explanation of what your code is doing and what one can expect the outcome to be? Overall this is a very complex approach at achieving the desired end result. – Will B. May 1 '19 at 15:50
  • 1
    @tonygil I am not able to determine what your expected results are from your answer and the the OP's dataset. It may be obvious to you, but I do not know how your answer answers the OP's question. However, you can pass by-reference instead of using global see: 3v4l.org/FEeFC This produces an explicitly defined variable, rather than one that can be changed and accessed globally. – Will B. May 2 '19 at 21:07
0

just do it, working for version 7.4 and above

uasort($yourArray,fn($prev,$now)=>$prev['order']<=>$now['order']);

pretty print

echo '<pre>';
print_r($yourArray);

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