12

I've split my gulpfile.js into several files in a /gulp folder to organize the code a little better. But now I want to pass a variable debug (boolean) into the files that will switch behaviour of the gulp command being included (eventually I will use command-line arguments, but for now I just want to make it work with a variable).

The way I've got this setup, using a method I saw in a yeoman angular/gulp package, is using an npm module called require-dir (which loads all *.js files in the /gulp folder, where each has a set of gulp tasks that are set).

gulpfile.js:

var gulp = require('gulp'),
  run = require('run-sequence'),
  debug = true;

require('require-dir')('./gulp');

gulp.task('default', ['build', 'server', 'watch', '...']);

Which would load something like...

gulp/build.js:

var gulp = require('gulp'), 
  plumber = require('gulp-plumber'),
  ...;

gulp.task('build', function () {
  console.log(debug);
});

So when I run command gulp, which runs the default task, it will load build.js and then execute the build gulp task. But unfortunately, it seems that debug returns undefined.

How could I get this to work?

I was looking at using just module.exports() and node's require() method, but I couldn't figure out how to get the gulp task inside the included file to declare, so that it could then be run from the main gulpfile.js file (in the desired sequence).

Can anyone offer some assistance? Thanks

10

The normal module way, really. Just change that gulp/build.js file from not actually exporting anything to a proper require-able module:

module.exports = function(debug) {
  "use strict";

  var gulp = require('gulp'), 
      plumber = require('gulp-plumber'),
      ...;

  gulp.task('build', function () {
    console.log(debug);
  });
};

and then call it in your main file as:

...
var loadGulp = require('require-dir/gulp');
...
var debug = true;
loadGulp(debug);
  • 1
    So theoretically after running the loadGulp() method, the gulp task should be registered, so then I should be able to run gulp.start('build') and it will be available...? – BuildTester1 Nov 19 '14 at 2:01
  • 1
    correct. the require('require-dir/gulp') operation now loads a function, and running that functions now registers the gulp task, after which it can be called like any other. – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Nov 19 '14 at 2:02
  • Is there a way to make the require file self init upon import, so I don't have to call the function? ie. require('gulp/build.js'); instead of var build = require('gulp/build.js')? – BuildTester1 Nov 19 '14 at 17:52
  • 2
    ... it's still javascript. require('./gulp/build')(debug); works just fine, but looks weird, so you probably want to change the module.exports to return an object { loadTask: function(debug) { ... } }; instead, so that your main code call looks like require('./gulp/build').loadTask(debug); instead. Nicer on your eyes, and more sensible as a code call. – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Nov 19 '14 at 22:51
  • Cool, require('./gulp/build').loadTask(debug); looks nice! Thanks for all your help! – BuildTester1 Nov 20 '14 at 18:28
6

Node.js offers a single global variable named global which is, in fact, the same instance in all modules (unlike module which is different in each module). By setting values on global they become truly global. As an added bonus, you don't need the prefix access to global variables with global.. Both global.foo and just foo are equivalent so long as you don't have another variable named foo in scope.

  • that's a really bad idea, especially if any other module taps into the global state. You should never pollute the global state, just make your module return a generator function that you pass your arguments into, to get the fully qualified function you actually need to run. – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Nov 19 '14 at 1:51
  • While I certainly agree that you generally want to avoid globals as much as possible, there are times when they are both useful and appropriate. That said, it's handy to know how to do so in Node. – Andrew Miner Nov 19 '14 at 1:53
  • this is not one such times. – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Nov 19 '14 at 1:55
  • 2
    They are very appropriate in certain situations, for example a variable that may or may not change after runtime but are used throughout your application. Not all applications are web apps, sometimes they are workers where specific requirements may diverge from normal ideologies. Therefor, this is the correct answer, not the dogmatic one by Mike above based on his theory that "globals are evil." Globals are evil if you are lazy and put everything in the global scope, but they exist for a reason, and there are countless reasons why they are needed sometimes. – Sandwich Sep 6 '17 at 15:10
2

I just create one object with all variables in it that I export as a module so I can use it throughout all my task files. For example

js/tasks/variables.js

module.exports = {
    myBool: true
};

js/tasks/sass.js

var gulp = require('gulp'),
    $ = require('gulp-load-plugins')(),
    log = $.util.log,
    vars = require('./variables');

gulp.task('sass', function () {
    log('myBool: ' + vars.myBool); // logs "myBool: true"
    vars.myBool = false;
});

js/tasks/build.js

var gulp = require('gulp'),
    $ = require('gulp-load-plugins')(),
    log = $.util.log,
    vars = require('./variables');

gulp.task('build', function () {
    log('myBool: ' + vars.myBool); // logs "myBool: false"
});

/gulpfile.js

Then you can get/set those variables from anywhere:

var gulp = require('gulp'),
    $ = require('gulp-load-plugins')(),
    runSequence = require('run-sequence'),
    vars = require('./js/tasks/variables'),
    requireDir = require('require-dir')('./js/tasks');

gulp.task('production', function(){
    runSequence('sass', 'build');
});

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