192

I can find syntax "charts" on this on the SQLite website, but no examples and my code is crashing. I have other tables with unique constraints on a single column, but I want to add a constraint to the table on two columns. This is what I have that is causing an SQLiteException with the message "syntax error".

CREATE TABLE name (column defs) 
UNIQUE (col_name1, col_name2) ON CONFLICT REPLACE

I'm doing this based on the following:

table-constraint

To be clear, the documentation on the link I provided says that CONTSTRAINT name should come before my constraint definition.

Something that may lead to the solution though is that whatever follows my parenthesized column definitions is what the debugger complains about.

If I put

...last_column_name last_col_datatype) CONSTRAINT ...

the error is near "CONSTRAINT": syntax error

If I put

...last_column_name last_col_datatype) UNIQUE ...

the error is near "UNIQUE": syntax error

1
  • 1
    UNIQUE is missing a comma before it starts.. Nov 29, 2016 at 6:48

5 Answers 5

369

Put the UNIQUE declaration within the column definition section; working example:

CREATE TABLE a (
    i INT,
    j INT,
    UNIQUE(i, j) ON CONFLICT REPLACE
);
8
  • 6
    Nice answer +1. Does this create syntax allow me to use the regular insert method, and not the insertWithOnConflict with the SQLiteDatabase.CONFLICT_REPLACE flag? Jan 25, 2014 at 16:23
  • 4
    I'm using ON CONFLICT IGNORE (haven't tried replace yet) with more than 2 columns, but I'm not seeing it honor the unique constraint, it just merrily adds the duplicates.
    – Michael
    Jul 17, 2014 at 0:10
  • 5
    apparently because i have NULL columns, and that just shoots the unique check out the window
    – Michael
    Jul 17, 2014 at 0:14
  • 2
    Beware using ON CONFLICT REPLACE it may not be what you want--it deletes pre-existing rows to allow the new row to be inserted. Normally, I would want to ABORT or ROLLBACK the constraint violation. SQLite ON CONFLICT clause
    – karmakaze
    Feb 23, 2020 at 2:47
  • It seems that adding UNIQUE(i, j) to the create statement is completely ignored on android. It creates the table, but leaves off the UNIQUE constraint. I was only able to do this by using an index.
    – gattsbr
    Aug 11, 2020 at 14:55
9

Well, your syntax doesn't match the link you included, which specifies:

 CREATE TABLE name (column defs) 
    CONSTRAINT constraint_name    -- This is new
    UNIQUE (col_name1, col_name2) ON CONFLICT REPLACE
1
  • I initially did that...didn't work. I tried it again just in case...still doesn't work
    – Rich
    Apr 23, 2010 at 20:48
9

If you already have a table and can't/don't want to recreate it for whatever reason, use indexes:

CREATE UNIQUE INDEX my_index ON my_table(col_1, col_2);
1
  • This worked for me on android 10 since it seems that adding UNIQUE(i, j) to the create statement is completely ignored on android.
    – gattsbr
    Aug 11, 2020 at 14:54
1

Be careful how you define the table for you will get different results on insert. Consider the following



CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS t1 (id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, a TEXT UNIQUE, b TEXT);
INSERT INTO t1 (a, b) VALUES
    ('Alice', 'Some title'),
    ('Bob', 'Palindromic guy'),
    ('Charles', 'chucky cheese'),
    ('Alice', 'Some other title') 
    ON CONFLICT(a) DO UPDATE SET b=excluded.b;
CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS t2 (id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, a TEXT UNIQUE, b TEXT, UNIQUE(a) ON CONFLICT REPLACE);
INSERT INTO t2 (a, b) VALUES
    ('Alice', 'Some title'),
    ('Bob', 'Palindromic guy'),
    ('Charles', 'chucky cheese'),
    ('Alice', 'Some other title');

$ sqlite3 test.sqlite
SQLite version 3.28.0 2019-04-16 19:49:53
Enter ".help" for usage hints.
sqlite> CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS t1 (id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, a TEXT UNIQUE, b TEXT);
sqlite> INSERT INTO t1 (a, b) VALUES
   ...>     ('Alice', 'Some title'),
   ...>     ('Bob', 'Palindromic guy'),
   ...>     ('Charles', 'chucky cheese'),
   ...>     ('Alice', 'Some other title') 
   ...>     ON CONFLICT(a) DO UPDATE SET b=excluded.b;
sqlite> CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS t2 (id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, a TEXT UNIQUE, b TEXT, UNIQUE(a) ON CONFLICT REPLACE);
sqlite> INSERT INTO t2 (a, b) VALUES
   ...>     ('Alice', 'Some title'),
   ...>     ('Bob', 'Palindromic guy'),
   ...>     ('Charles', 'chucky cheese'),
   ...>     ('Alice', 'Some other title');
sqlite> .mode col
sqlite> .headers on
sqlite> select * from t1;
id          a           b               
----------  ----------  ----------------
1           Alice       Some other title
2           Bob         Palindromic guy 
3           Charles     chucky cheese   
sqlite> select * from t2;
id          a           b              
----------  ----------  ---------------
2           Bob         Palindromic guy
3           Charles     chucky cheese  
4           Alice       Some other titl
sqlite> 

While the insert/update effect is the same, the id changes based on the table definition type (see the second table where 'Alice' now has id = 4; the first table is doing more of what I expect it to do, keep the PRIMARY KEY the same). Be aware of this effect.

0

work for me

create table projects (
    _id integer primary key autoincrement,
    project_type text not null,
    name text not null,
    description text,
    last_updated datetime default current_timestamp,
    date_created datetime default current_timestamp,
    unique (project_type, name)
);

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