3

I am trying to implement a mechanism, which would provide me some information about the template argument function type. Main idea is to get the number of arguments, return type, total sum of sizes of each argument. I have something running for lambdas based on this entry.

template <typename T, typename... Args>
struct sumSizeOfArgs {
    enum { totalSize = sizeof(typename std::decay<T>::type) + sumSizeOfArgs<Args...>::totalSize };
};

template<typename T>
struct sumSizeOfArgs<T> {
    enum  {totalSize = sizeof(typename std::decay<T>::type)};
};
}             
template <typename T>
struct function_traits : public function_traits<decltype(&T::operator())>
{};

template <typename ClassType, typename ReturnType, typename... Args>

struct function_traits<ReturnType(ClassType::*)(Args...) const>
{
  enum { arity = sizeof...(Args) };

  typedef ReturnType result_type;

enum { totalSize = sumSizeOfArgs<Args...>::totalSize };

template <size_t i>
struct arg
{
    typedef typename std::tuple_element<i, std::tuple<Args...>>::type type;
};
};

However, indeed this code does not work for normal functions types such as

 function_traits<void()>

it does not have an operator(). I would greatly appreciate, any suggestion to make this code work for both cases. Thanks,

1
  • Your sumSizeOfArgs is of limited utility, as it will choke when instantiated with 0 template-arguments. You might want to correct that. Nov 19, 2014 at 18:45

1 Answer 1

4

Slightly improved original part:

#include <tuple>
#include <type_traits>

template <typename... Args>
struct sumSizeOfArgs
{
    static constexpr size_t totalSize = 0;
};

template <typename T, typename... Args>
struct sumSizeOfArgs<T, Args...>
{
    static constexpr size_t totalSize = sizeof(typename std::decay<T>::type)
                                        + sumSizeOfArgs<Args...>::totalSize;
};

template <typename T>
struct sumSizeOfArgs<T>
{
    static constexpr size_t totalSize = sizeof(typename std::decay<T>::type);
};

template <typename T>
struct function_traits_impl;

template <typename ClassType, typename ReturnType, typename... Args>
struct function_traits_impl<ReturnType(ClassType::*)(Args...)>
{
    static constexpr size_t arity = sizeof...(Args);

    using result_type = ReturnType;

    static constexpr size_t totalSize = sumSizeOfArgs<Args...>::totalSize;

    template <size_t i>
    struct arg
    {
        using type = typename std::tuple_element<i, std::tuple<Args...>>::type;
    };
};

template <typename ClassType, typename ReturnType, typename... Args>
struct function_traits_impl<ReturnType(ClassType::*)(Args...) const>
    : function_traits_impl<ReturnType(ClassType::*)(Args...)> {};

New part starts here (traits' class partial specialization for functions):

template <typename ReturnType, typename... Args>
struct function_traits_impl<ReturnType(Args...)>
{
    static constexpr size_t arity = sizeof...(Args);

    using result_type = ReturnType;

    static constexpr size_t totalSize = sumSizeOfArgs<Args...>::totalSize;

    template <size_t i>
    struct arg
    {
        using type = typename std::tuple_element<i, std::tuple<Args...>>::type;
    };
};

template <typename ReturnType, typename... Args>
struct function_traits_impl<ReturnType(*)(Args...)>
    : function_traits_impl<ReturnType(Args...)> {};

Crucial part is here (determining the presence of operator()):

template <typename T, typename V = void>
struct function_traits
    : function_traits_impl<T> {};

template <typename T>
struct function_traits<T, decltype((void)&T::operator())>
    : function_traits_impl<decltype(&T::operator())> {};

Test:

int main()
{
    static_assert(function_traits<void()>::arity == 0, "!");

    static_assert(function_traits<void(int)>::arity == 1, "!");

    static_assert(function_traits<void(*)(int, float)>::arity == 2, "!");  

    auto lambda = [] (int, float, char) {};
    static_assert(function_traits<decltype(lambda)>::arity == 3, "!");

    auto mutable_lambda = [] (int, float, char, double) mutable {};
    static_assert(function_traits<decltype(mutable_lambda)>::arity == 4, "!");
}

DEMO 1


Or even simpler, with a single trait class:

#include <tuple>

template <typename ReturnType, typename... Args>
struct function_traits_defs
{
    static constexpr size_t arity = sizeof...(Args);

    using result_type = ReturnType;

    template <size_t i>
    struct arg
    {
        using type = typename std::tuple_element<i, std::tuple<Args...>>::type;
    };
};

template <typename T>
struct function_traits_impl;

template <typename ReturnType, typename... Args>
struct function_traits_impl<ReturnType(Args...)>
    : function_traits_defs<ReturnType, Args...> {};

template <typename ReturnType, typename... Args>
struct function_traits_impl<ReturnType(*)(Args...)>
    : function_traits_defs<ReturnType, Args...> {};

template <typename ClassType, typename ReturnType, typename... Args>
struct function_traits_impl<ReturnType(ClassType::*)(Args...)>
    : function_traits_defs<ReturnType, Args...> {};

template <typename ClassType, typename ReturnType, typename... Args>
struct function_traits_impl<ReturnType(ClassType::*)(Args...) const>
    : function_traits_defs<ReturnType, Args...> {};

// + other cv-ref-variations

template <typename T, typename V = void>
struct function_traits
    : function_traits_impl<T> {};

template <typename T>
struct function_traits<T, decltype((void)&T::operator())>
    : function_traits_impl<decltype(&T::operator())> {};

int main()
{
    static_assert(function_traits<void()>::arity == 0, "!");

    static_assert(function_traits<void(int)>::arity == 1, "!");

    static_assert(function_traits<void(*)(int, float)>::arity == 2, "!");  

    auto lambda = [] (int, float, char) {};
    static_assert(function_traits<decltype(lambda)>::arity == 3, "!");

    auto mutable_lambda = [] (int, float, char, double) mutable {};
    static_assert(function_traits<decltype(mutable_lambda)>::arity == 4, "!");

    struct Functor
    {
        void operator()(int) {}
    };
    static_assert(function_traits<Functor>::arity == 1, "!");
}

DEMO 2


Note: Unfortunately none of the above solutions will work for generic lambdas, related discussion is Arity of a generic lambda

5
  • 1
    Worth noting that taking the address of operator() obviously won't work for polymorphic lambdas.
    – T.C.
    Nov 19, 2014 at 20:54
  • @T.C. noted as suggested Nov 19, 2014 at 20:58
  • This looks great thank you! Can you explain to me this part actually, what is this specialization why (void)? template <typename T> struct function_traits<T, decltype((void)&T::operator())> : function_traits_impl<decltype(&T::operator())> {};
    – edorado
    Nov 19, 2014 at 21:45
  • @edorado: (1). The name lookup finds primary template; (2). Compiler searches for specialization (using void as second argument); (3). Compiler tries to instantiate the specialization with decltype((void)&T::operator()); (4). If the expression in decltype is well-formed, it gets casted to void and hence is treated by compiler as viable partial-specialization that can be used (which is designed to work with operator()), otherwise, it falls back to primary template, and uses that class template for functions. See video Nov 19, 2014 at 21:54
  • Really minor thing, you could add a specialization for ReturnType(&)(Args...), or put a template in front that decays T. That way it works for things like types deduced from rvalue refs such as here template<typename T> void foo(T&& f) { function_traits<T>::arity; } May 13, 2021 at 3:18

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