I have a nested dictionary as such:

myDict = {'a': {1:2, 2:163, 3:12, 4:67, 5:84}, 
          'about': {1:27, 2:45, 3:21, 4:10, 5:15}, 
          'apple': {1:0, 2: 5, 3:0, 4:10, 5:0}, 
          'anticipate': {1:1, 2:5, 3:0, 4:8, 5:7}, 
          'an': {1:3, 2:15, 3:1, 4:312, 5:100}}
  • The outer key is a word,
  • the inner keys are file/document ids
  • the values are the number of times the word (outer key occurs)

How do I calculate the sum of the square values to the inner keys? For example for the inner key number 1, I should get:

2^2 + 27^2 + 0^2 + 1^2 + 3^2

because the inner key 1 appears 2 times in 'a', 27 times in 'about', 0 times in apple, 1 time in 'anticipate' and 3 times in 'an'


Given the nested dictionary object how do I find the distance between a pair of files/documents?

For example, the distance between the file/document id 1 and 2 would be calculate as such:

doc1 =  {'a':2, 'about':27, 'apple':0, 'anticipate':1, 'an':3} # (i.e. inner key `1`)
doc2 =  {'a':163, 'about':45, 'apple':5, 'anticipate':5, 'an':15} # (i.e. inner key `1`)

I want to know how different/similar the documents are, so how do I get a single floating number as a distance score for the two documents?

How do I calculate the dot product across these two documents?

I've tried calculating a single value for each document by considering:

((2*0) + (27*0) + (3*1) + (1*1) + (0*1)) / (magnitude of file vector * magnitude of search phrase vector)

Using my code as such:

vecDist = {}
    for word in search:
        for fileNum in myDict.iteritems():
            vecDist[fileNum] = "dotproduct" / magnitudeFileVec[fileNum] * magnitudeSearchVec
  • 7
    What is your question/problem and what have you tried so far. Right now what you present is a statement of intent. – scrappedcola Nov 19 '14 at 21:53
  • 1
    You are missing the point. Re-read your post here. Do you actually see a question? If someone was to come to you handed this to you would you know what they wanted? The first part matches the previous question and doesn't need to be there. All that is needed is that you update your question with details. That is all. – scrappedcola Nov 19 '14 at 22:17
  • 1
    I think I can help clarify: I think you got lucky with your previous question. In both questions, you've presented your data and what you want to do with it, but in neither case have you shown us any code or described a specific question for the SO community to answer. You've described what you want some code to do, but that is not the same thing, because SO isn't here to write code for you. In your other question, a user was kind enough to simply write your code for you. What happened with this question is a more likely outcome when you don't show any attempt to solve the problem yourself. – skrrgwasme Nov 19 '14 at 22:34
  • 2
    No. Change how you ask questions. Start by reading How to Ask a Good Question. Describe what you've done to try to solve the problem. There is a world of difference between "I have data and I want to do X with it" and "I wrote code to do X to my data, but it does Y instead". If you follow the second form, it's not a matter of luck. You'll get good answers. If you don't even know how to start coding, then say so, and describe the research you've done to even attempt to solve the problem. – skrrgwasme Nov 19 '14 at 22:46
  • 1
    I'm sure that your question makes sense to you, and that you put some effort writing it down. But trust me, except for the first part (not by chance immediately answered by Mr Tessellating) that was sufficiently clear to me, I haven't been able to understand any one of your other requests. I think that most of the bad reception is not due to the tone of your counter-comments, or the absence of code, etc but rather to the bad, very bad quality of your question (see also Mr Tessellating comment on your second part). I warmly suggest that you take a step back to rethink and rewrite your questio – gboffi Nov 19 '14 at 23:15

The first bit is easy enough. You want to build up a dictionary containing file numbers, and the sum of the squares of the values for each file number, something like this (untested) should do it:

fileVectors = {}

for wordDict in myDict.itervalues():
    for fileNumber, wordCount in wordDict.iteritems():
        fileVectors[fileNumber] = fileVectors.get(fileNumber, 0) + (wordCount ** 2)
  • Why did the other guy say that he could see no question when you could? – KeyboardNinja Nov 19 '14 at 22:34
  • 2
    @KeyboardNinja It's social, not technical. I think he can see what you want, but he's reading your post like: "no code? no error message? not even a step by step design attempt? this isn't a friendly interested programmer putting effort in and wanting to learn, this is a lazy outsider taking advantage of StackOverflow to get code written for free! Maybe a homework cheat? That's abusive and rude!" and is frustrated. I can see that interpretation, but I'm giving you the benefit of the doubt. I didn't follow the second part though. – TessellatingHeckler Nov 19 '14 at 23:12

Firstly, your dictionary of dictionary is a nice start for what you're doing but it's too convoluted try using a numpy array:

import numpy as np

vocabulary = ['a', 'about', 'apple', 'anticipate', 'an']
matrix = [[2,27, 0, 1, 3], [163, 45, 5, 5, 15], [12, 21, 0, 0, 1], [67, 10, 10, 8, 312], [84, 15, 0, 7, 100]]

matrix = np.array(matrix)

print matrix 

[out]:

[[  2  27   0   1   3]
 [163  45   5   5  15]
 [ 12  21   0   0   1]
 [ 67  10  10   8 312]
 [ 84  15   0   7 100]]

Now you can clearly see that that you rows are documents and your columns are word counts.

To access the term/word vector (i.e. the column):

for i, term in enumerate(vocabulary):
    vector = matrix[:,i]
    print term, vector, vector.sum()

[out]:

a [  2 163  12  67  84] 328
about [27 45 21 10 15] 118
apple [ 0  5  0 10  0] 15
anticipate [1 5 0 8 7] 21
an [  3  15   1 312 100] 431

To access the document vector (i.e. the row):

for i, document in enumerate(matrix):
    print i, document

[out]:

0 [ 2 27  0  1  3]
1 [163  45   5   5  15]
2 [12 21  0  0  1]
3 [ 67  10  10   8 312]
4 [ 84  15   0   7 100]

To access individual row:

doc1 = matrix[0,:]
doc2 = matrix[1,:]

print doc1
print doc2

[out]:

[ 2 27  0  1  3]
[163  45   5   5  15]

To calculate sum of square values in a vector:

`np.sum(doc1**2)`

[out]:

743

To calculate the dot product between two vector, simply:

print np.dot(doc1, doc2)

[out]:

1591

If you're totally stuck with the nested dictionaries, here's how to convert it into a numpy array:

import numpy as np

myDict = {'a': {1:2, 2:163, 3:12, 4:67, 5:84}, 
          'about': {1:27, 2:45, 3:21, 4:10, 5:15}, 
          'apple': {1:0, 2: 5, 3:0, 4:10, 5:0}, 
          'anticipate': {1:1, 2:5, 3:0, 4:8, 5:7}, 
          'an': {1:3, 2:15, 3:1, 4:312, 5:100}}

vocabulary = myDict.keys()
matrix = [[myDict[i][j] for j in myDict[i]] for i in myDict]
matrix = np.array(matrix)
matrix = np.transpose(matrix)

print matrix

[out]:

[[  2  27   0   1   3]
 [163  45   5   5  15]
 [ 12  21   0   0   1]
 [ 67  10  10   8 312]
 [ 84  15   0   7 100]]
  • This is great, the only problem is that it has to be a dictionary because the code I was given already creates a dictionary like myDict and I am not allowed to change it. – KeyboardNinja Nov 20 '14 at 1:19
  • Take a look at the conversion snippet. Convert the dict of dicts into the np.array and then work with the array. Ask whoever gave you the code to slap themselves and wake up a little since they are doing messed up things... hahahahaa, just joking about the slapping. – alvas Nov 20 '14 at 1:26
  • Since you are only calculating the distance, you dont modify the crazy dictionary of dictionaries structure but you simply create a copy of it and morph it into a numpy array to simplify manipulation... – alvas Nov 20 '14 at 1:56

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.