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Is there ever a scenario when we won't use volatile for class member of an object shared between threads? My understanding is that volatile keyword ensures that the object value is not cached by thread but always read from memory, but not marking it volatile doesn't mean that it will always be thread cached. So my question is, can we guarantee anything by not marking such a class as volatile, or will the code be open to random behavior?

EDIT: I understand that using volatile for everything doesn't guarantee the correctness of my logic whatsoever. My question is more of a theoretical nature and is my attempt at understanding the Java Memory Model.

  • Well, final is also commonly used for members of shared objects.... – Louis Wasserman Nov 19 '14 at 22:11
  • Does final imply that the member would be considered thread local? What if I don't add final either? – mindreader Nov 19 '14 at 22:13
  • Making everything volatile provides as much thread safety as making every method synchronized. You're still open to wrong behavior, for example if you need to see 2 members of a class in a consistent state, neither synchronized getters nor volatile will guarantee that. You'll need an atomic copy of the entire state or external synchronization or .. volatile is IMO rarely useful since the guarantees are very specific. – zapl Nov 19 '14 at 22:16
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    Just throwing volatile around like it's going out of style doesn't do anything for thread safety, and volatile fields restricts the optimizer and require additional work (memory fences IIRC). So if you don't have a specific reason to use volatile, why would you use it? – user395760 Nov 19 '14 at 22:16
  • I understand that using volatile for everything wouldn't guarantee the correctness of my logic whatsoever. My question is more for a theoretical nature and is my attempt at understanding the Java Memory Model. – mindreader Nov 19 '14 at 22:25
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First of all you should not explain concurrency in terms of caches. Since version 2 java memory model is more formal and has weaker requirements. So, it is all about happens-before order.

if you need concurrent access to some variable you have to order writes and reads by happens-before. This is most import thing. Volatile is just one of implementations of this ordering.

So, instead of volatile you can use any operation with happens-before semantic. From JLS:

  • An unlock on a monitor happens-before every subsequent lock on that monitor.

  • A call to start() on a thread happens-before any actions in the started thread.

  • All actions in a thread happen-before any other thread successfully
    returns from a join() on that thread.

  • The default initialization of any object happens-before any other
    actions (other than default-writes) of a program.

  • Thanks for the explanation, Denis. Please see the updated (clarification added) question. – mindreader Nov 21 '14 at 11:32
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    Ok, short answer for "can we guarantee anything by not marking such a class as volatile, or will the code be open to random behavior?" - yes, we can. Take a look to my list, for example you can write and read shared variable under lock using synchronized. In this case volatile is redundant. – Denis Borovikov Nov 21 '14 at 11:59
  • Perfect! Just what I was looking for. Thanks! – mindreader Nov 21 '14 at 12:04
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At least immutable objects never need any synchronization of any kind. So using volatile for fields of immutable classes does not make sense.

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    That makes sense! Thank you. Do you think there can be scenarios other than this? – mindreader Nov 19 '14 at 22:26
  • thank you! simple and useful – João Vilaça Jun 1 '16 at 21:43
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If you don't declare a variable as volatile, and don't do any sort of mutex locking before it is accessed, then yes you always expose yourself to unpredictable behavior and race conditions/deadlocking.

  • It's not so much of race conditions and deadlocking that I'm concerned about here. I'm asking from the perspective of threads seeing most recent updates. – mindreader Nov 19 '14 at 22:17
  • This is the same. There is no guarantee how recent the update is that any other thread can see, unless you enforce happens-before relationships as they are called in concurrency-speak. – Ralf H Nov 19 '14 at 22:40

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