366

output:

hello
How are you

code:

<p>hello <br> How are you </p>

How to achieve same output without <br>?

25 Answers 25

350

Impossible with the same HTML structure, you must have something to distinguish between Hello and How are you.

I suggest using spans that you will then display as blocks (just like a <div> actually).

HTML:

<p><span>hello</span><span>How are you</span></p>

CSS:

p span 
{
    display: block;
}
  • 32
    note also how much additional mark-up there is - the <br /> element exists for a very good reason. If you want the line break because they are separate paragraphs, then simply mark them up as separate paragraphs. – Rowland Shaw Apr 24 '10 at 8:11
  • 8
    You might need structured lines without actually using paragraphs. To markup a poem, a song or an address for example – Vincent Robert Apr 27 '10 at 10:35
  • 7
    Note that assigning display: block to an element will force a line break before and after, and so is not at all the same as having one line break. – jerseyboy Jul 12 '13 at 0:15
  • 16
    Definitely use the <p> elements. A <span> element should NOT be made into display:block, the whole point of <span> is that it's inline. I would do it this way: <div><p>hello</p><p>How are you</p></div>. No wonked out CSS required. – Miles Oct 31 '13 at 17:42
  • 10
    This answer is wrong, look at the css-only answer below. – Alex Nov 11 '16 at 16:13
313

You can use white-space: pre; to make elements act like <pre>, which preserves newlines. Example:

<style>
 p {
  white-space: pre;
 }
</style>
<p>hello
How are you</p>

Note that this doesn't work in IE6 or IE7. I don't know about IE8.

111

Use <br/> as normal, but hide it with display: none when you don't want it.

I would expect most people finding this question want to use css / responsive design to decide whether or not a line-break appears in a specific place. (and don't have anything personal against <br/>)

While not immediately obvious, you can actually apply display:none to a <br/> tag to hide it, which enables the use of media queries in tandem with semantic BR tags.

 <div>
   The quick brown fox<br />
   jumps over the lazy dog
 </div>

 @media screen and (min-width: 20em) 
 {
    br 
    { 
       display: none;   // hide the BR tag for wider screens (i.e. disable the line break)
    }
 }

This is useful in responsive design where you need to force text into two lines at an exact break.

http://jsfiddle.net/nNbD3/1/

  • 5
    Simon, you are spot on — the example you name is the exact reason I was researching this question and the display: none solution is by far the most appropriate and useful. – abbottjam Jun 24 '14 at 5:53
  • 7
    Note that for cases where it would cause words to run together, you could use something like display: inline-block; width: 1em; instead of none. – Beejor Aug 11 '16 at 1:20
  • 2
    You could even apply a class to the <br class='foo'> if you needed more control but don't go too crazy! – Simon_Weaver Nov 27 '16 at 6:36
  • Another "why didn't I think of this?!" answer. <br/> is great at what it does; no need to reinvent the wheel. Thanks! – rinogo Oct 24 '17 at 5:30
  • Similar concept can be applied to flex-box layout : stackoverflow.com/questions/29732575/… – Simon_Weaver Jun 21 '18 at 22:40
92

There are several options for defining the handling of white spaces and line breaks. If one can put the content in e.g. a <p> tag it is pretty easy to get whatever one wants.

For preserving line breaks but not white spaces use pre-line (not pre) like in:

<style>
 p {
     white-space: pre-line; /* collapse WS, preserve LB */
   }
</style>

<p>hello
How are you</p>

If another behavior is wanted choose among one of these (WS=WhiteSpace, LB=LineBreak):

     white-space: normal;   /* collapse WS, wrap as necessary, collapse LB */
     white-space: nowrap;   /* collapse WS, no wrapping,       collapse LB */
     white-space: pre;      /* preserve WS, no wrapping,       preserve LB */
     white-space: pre-wrap; /* preserve WS, wrap as necessary, preserve LB */
     white-space: inherit;  /* all as parent element */

SOURCE: W3 Schools

  • 4
    perfect. should be the selected answer. – Ben Lin Sep 30 '15 at 17:15
  • 1
    I believe this is what OP is looking for. – John Sardinha Oct 1 '16 at 15:29
63

The "\a" command in CSS generates a carriage return. This is CSS, not HTML, so it shall be closer to what you want: no extra markup.

In a blockquote, the example below displays both the title and the source link and separate the two with a carriage return ("\a"):

blockquote[title][cite]:after {
    content:attr(title)"\a"attr(cite)
}
  • Fancy, but totally unneeded for what the question was. – YePhIcK Feb 6 '14 at 7:29
  • 15
    +1 because its CSS only, and doesn’t recommend use of pre, br tags nor changing the display mode to block (which adds different behavior, might break if the parent is in display:flex and therefore is a hack in this context). Its not fancy, really, just a modern technique. If you want the exact same markup, but to actually react differently that’s the way to go. – renoirb Jul 2 '14 at 1:29
  • Brilliant idea. Note the " – do not use simple quotes ' because you want to allow the \a to get parsed as a special character. – Hafenkranich Aug 11 '16 at 17:17
  • 1
    i want to give +1 but it not work for me on chrome 55 – pery mimon Jan 9 '17 at 23:10
  • 3
    I would have up-voted this if there was some HTML and maybe a Fiddle to help visualize what you're doing. – John Jul 19 '17 at 23:50
29

At the CSS use the code

p {
    white-space: pre-line;
}

With this code css every enter inside the P tag will be a break-line at the html.

  • 1
    This is exactly what I was looking for! Works perfectly for element content generated from JS (e.g. JSON result from AJAX query, angular-schema-form, etc.) that gets passed through escaping/sanitization (e.g. normal AngularJS escaping behavior when not using ngBindHtml) – Stefan Dragnev Jul 18 '16 at 14:10
  • This is the only right solution! – Roel Nov 3 '16 at 9:55
27

Building on what has been said before, this is a pure CSS solution that works.

<style>
  span {
    display: inline;
  }
  span:before {
    content: "\a ";
    white-space: pre;
  }
</style>
<p>
  First line of text. <span>Next line.</span>
</p>
  • I just found a variation on this approach to be helpful for multi-line input type='text', wrapping the input, and then laying the text over it with a wrapper div. That also requires pointer-events:none;` on the :before in order to still be able to click the button below. – Eric Lease Feb 1 '16 at 6:16
9

To make an element have a line break afterwards, assign it:

display:block;

Non-floated elements after a block level element will appear on the next line. Many elements, such as <p> and <div> are already block level elements so you can just use those.

But while this is good to know, this really depends more on the context of your content. In your example, you would not want to use CSS to force a line break. The <br /> is appropriate because semantically the p tag is the the most appropriate for the text you are displaying. More markup just to hang CSS off it is unnecessary. Technically it's not exactly a paragraph, but there is no <greeting> tag, so use what you have. Describing your content well with HTMl is way more important - after you have that then figure out how to make it look pretty.

  • 1
    But this makes it the full width of the container, which might be an unwanted side effect (especially if the item is an anchor/link). – NickG Aug 20 '15 at 10:11
  • Yes, by default block level elements take up the full width unless you set a width. Read my paragraph about context - thinking in terms of semantic context rather than choosing your html based on your design generally helps prevent you from running into issues like that. – Syntax Error Aug 20 '15 at 13:39
  • 1
    Often the reason <br> tags need to be avoided is more technical than semantic. <br> tags are standalone and you can't necessarily use them as you don't know if the elements in front will exist at the time you render the page, so you might not want blank lines. Consider a list of <a> links on a vertical menu where you want them all on their own line, but can't use <br> as you don't know which links will get hidden due to server-side rules. Hiding the links would cause blank lines if <br> were used. – NickG Aug 21 '15 at 9:28
  • 1
    ..For that reason, people often use a <ul> list and then hide the bullets, but that's pretty hacky. It would be better if there was a css rule which just said "always render on own line". – NickG Aug 21 '15 at 9:29
  • 1
    But as I said in my first comment - that has the undesirable side effect of the elements being full width :) I just need items on a new line, without them being full width. If the item is a link on the far left of the page, it means even clicks on the far right of the screen follow the link. – NickG Aug 21 '15 at 19:34
9
<pre> <---------------------------------------
lorem ipsum
lorem ipsum
lorem ipsum
lorem ipsum
lorem ipsum
</pre> <--------------------------------------

OR

<div style="white-space:pre">  <-----------------------------------
lorem ipsum
lorem ipsum
lorem ipsum
lorem ipsum
lorem ipsum
</div>                         <-----------------------------------

source: https://stackoverflow.com/a/36191199/2377343

7

Here's a bad solution to a bad question, but one that literally meets the brief:

p {
    width : 12ex;
}

p:before {
    content: ".";
    float: right;
    padding-left: 6ex;
    visibility: hidden;
}
5

For a List of Links

The other answers provide some good ways of adding line breaks, depending on the situation. But it should be noted that the :after selector is one of the better ways to do this for CSS control over lists of links (and similar things), for reasons noted below.

Here's an example, assuming a table of contents:

<style type="text/css">
    .toc a:after{ content: "\a"; white-space: pre; }
</style>

<span class="toc">
    <a href="#a1">Item A1</a> <a href="#a2">Item A2</a>
    <a href="#b1">Item B1</a> <a href="#b2">Item B2</a>
</span>

And here's Simon_Weaver's technique, which is simpler and more compatible. It doesn't separate style and content as much, requires more code, and there may be cases where you want to add breaks after the fact. Still a great solution though, especially for older IE.

<style type="text/css">
    .toc br{ display: none; } /* comment out for horizontal links */
</style>

<span class="toc">
    <a href="#a1">Item A1</a><br/> <a href="#a2">Item A2</a><br/>
    <a href="#b1">Item B1</a><br/> <a href="#b2">Item B2</a><br/>
</span>

Note the advantages of the above solutions:

  • No matter the whitespace in the HTML, the output is the same (vs. pre)
  • No extra padding is added to the elements (see NickG's display:block comments)
  • You can easily switch between horizontal and vertical lists of links with some shared CSS without going into every HTML file for a style change
  • No float or clear styles affecting surrounding content
  • The style is separate from the content (vs. <br/>, or pre with hard-coded breaks)
  • This can also work for loose links using a.toc:after and <a class="toc">
  • You can add multiple breaks and even prefix/suffix text
4

Maybe someone will have the same issue as me:

I was in a element with display: flex so I had to use flex-direction: column.

4

Setting a br tag to display: none is helpful, but then you can end up with WordsRunTogether. I've found it more helpful to instead replace it with a space character, like so:

HTML:

<h1>
    Breaking<br />News:<br />BR<br />Considered<br />Harmful!
</h1>

CSS:

@media (min-device-width: 1281px){
    h1 br {content: ' ';}
    h1 br:after {content: ' ';}
}
  • 2
    You could also consider setting br to display: inline-block; width: 1em; which should prevent the words from running together when going horizontal. – Beejor Aug 11 '16 at 1:17
  • 1
    I like your suggestion better. I’ll try that next time I encounter this. – Bryan Aug 18 '16 at 16:45
3

How about<pre> tag?

source: http://www.w3schools.com/tags/tag_pre.asp

  • 1
    Isn't <pre> for unformatted text? Like code? – Micha Mazaheri Sep 30 '13 at 8:16
  • Oh! I see what you mean. Then you use whitespaces in your <pre> so it breaks the line. What if you want to have regular whitespaces? – Micha Mazaheri Sep 30 '13 at 8:18
  • The pre tag will interpret the carriage returns made within. So if you break your line between 'hello' and 'how are you' in a pre tag, the break will be render – Godineau Félicie Jul 20 '17 at 10:08
2

You can add a lot of padding and force text to be split to new line, for example

p{
    padding-right: 50%;
}

Worked fine for me in a situation with responsive design, where only within a certain width range it was needed for text to be split.

  • 1
    Sounds a nice idea but increasing padding will also increase the overall width of an object. And that can have a negative effect, specially in the case of a responsive page. – itsols Jun 28 '15 at 18:08
1

Using &nbsp; instead of spaces will prevent a break.

<span>I&nbsp;DONT&nbsp;WANT&nbsp;TO&nbsp;BREAK&nbsp;THIS&nbsp;LINE&nbsp;UP, but this text can be on any line.</span>
1

Use overflow-wrap: break-word; like :

.yourelement{
overflow-wrap: break-word;
}
0

Both Vincent Robert and Joey Adams answers are valid. If you don't want, however, change the markup, you can just insert a <br /> using javascript.

There is no way to do it in CSS without changing the markup.

  • That's not accurate. One could use :after or :before to do that. – Artur Bodera Jun 20 '12 at 16:47
  • Yes, and it won't work in most IE out there. – e-satis Jun 22 '12 at 16:16
0

In my case, I needed an input button to have a line break before it.
I applied the following style to the button and it worked:

clear:both;
0

In case this helps someone...

You could do this:

<p>This is an <a class="on-new-line">inline link</a>?</p>

With this css:

a.on-new-line:before { 
  content: '&nbsp;'; 
  font-size:0; 
  display:block;
  line-height:0;
}
  • or .on-new-line:before {content: ""; display: block;} – meuwka Mar 6 at 16:53
0

This works in Chrome:

p::after {
    content: "-";
    color: transparent;
    display: block;
}
0

I like very simple solutions, here is the one more

<p>hello <span>How are you</span></p>

and css

p {
 display: flex;
 flex-direction: column;
}
0

I'm guessing you did not want to use a breakpoint because it will always break the line. Is that correct? If so how about adding a breakpoint <br /> in your text, then giving it a class like <br class="hidebreak"/> then using media query right above the size you want it to break to hide the <br /> so it breaks at a specific width but stays inline above that width.

HTML:

<p>
The below line breaks at 766px.
</p>

<p>
 This is the line of text<br class="hidebreak"> I want to break.
</p>

CSS:

@media (min-width: 767px) {
  br.hidebreak {display:none;}
}

https://jsfiddle.net/517Design/o71yw5vd/

  • I just noticed that Simon_Weaver posted a answer similar to mine. Sorry Simon, wasn't trying to plagiarize your response. I didn't read all the answers before I posted mine and therefor did not notice yours. My bad... lesson learned.. I will read the other answers before posting mine in the future. – Krankit Jun 6 '18 at 20:22
  • No worries! But you have to write me a poem. From w3schools.com/tags/tag_br.asp "Tip: The <br> tag is useful for writing addresses or poems." – Simon_Weaver Jun 21 '18 at 22:41
0

You need to declare the content within <span class="class_name"></span>. After it the line will be break.

\A means line feed character.

.class_name::after {
  content: "\A";
  white-space: pre;
}
-1

Don't. If you want a hard line break, use one.

  • 3
    +1 Yes, but if the new line is purely for presentation use display: block;. – Web_Designer May 30 '12 at 22:54
  • 20
    I don't understand why this answer received any up votes. If I had the ability to use a hard line break, I wouldn't be looking at this question. – trliner Sep 5 '13 at 18:35

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