Problem: NSAttributedString takes an NSRange while I'm using a Swift String that uses Range

let text = "Long paragraph saying something goes here!"
let textRange = text.startIndex..<text.endIndex
let attributedString = NSMutableAttributedString(string: text)

text.enumerateSubstringsInRange(textRange, options: NSStringEnumerationOptions.ByWords, { (substring, substringRange, enclosingRange, stop) -> () in

    if (substring == "saying") {
        attributedString.addAttribute(NSForegroundColorAttributeName, value: NSColor.redColor(), range: substringRange)
    }
})

Produces the following error:

error: 'Range' is not convertible to 'NSRange' attributedString.addAttribute(NSForegroundColorAttributeName, value: NSColor.redColor(), range: substringRange)

11 Answers 11

up vote 200 down vote accepted

Swift String ranges and NSString ranges are not "compatible". For example, an emoji like 😄 counts as one Swift character, but as two NSString characters (a so-called UTF-16 surrogate pair).

Therefore your suggested solution will produce unexpected results if the string contains such characters. Example:

let text = "😄😄😄Long paragraph saying!"
let textRange = text.startIndex..<text.endIndex
let attributedString = NSMutableAttributedString(string: text)

text.enumerateSubstringsInRange(textRange, options: NSStringEnumerationOptions.ByWords, { (substring, substringRange, enclosingRange, stop) -> () in
    let start = distance(text.startIndex, substringRange.startIndex)
    let length = distance(substringRange.startIndex, substringRange.endIndex)
    let range = NSMakeRange(start, length)

    if (substring == "saying") {
        attributedString.addAttribute(NSForegroundColorAttributeName, value: NSColor.redColor(), range: range)
    }
})
println(attributedString)

Output:

😄😄😄Long paragra{
}ph say{
    NSColor = "NSCalibratedRGBColorSpace 1 0 0 1";
}ing!{
}

As you see, "ph say" has been marked with the attribute, not "saying".

Since NS(Mutable)AttributedString ultimately requires an NSString and an NSRange, it is actually better to convert the given string to NSString first. Then the substringRange is an NSRange and you don't have to convert the ranges anymore:

let text = "😄😄😄Long paragraph saying!"
let nsText = text as NSString
let textRange = NSMakeRange(0, nsText.length)
let attributedString = NSMutableAttributedString(string: nsText)

nsText.enumerateSubstringsInRange(textRange, options: NSStringEnumerationOptions.ByWords, { (substring, substringRange, enclosingRange, stop) -> () in

    if (substring == "saying") {
        attributedString.addAttribute(NSForegroundColorAttributeName, value: NSColor.redColor(), range: substringRange)
    }
})
println(attributedString)

Output:

😄😄😄Long paragraph {
}saying{
    NSColor = "NSCalibratedRGBColorSpace 1 0 0 1";
}!{
}

Update for Swift 2:

let text = "😄😄😄Long paragraph saying!"
let nsText = text as NSString
let textRange = NSMakeRange(0, nsText.length)
let attributedString = NSMutableAttributedString(string: text)

nsText.enumerateSubstringsInRange(textRange, options: .ByWords, usingBlock: {
    (substring, substringRange, _, _) in

    if (substring == "saying") {
        attributedString.addAttribute(NSForegroundColorAttributeName, value: NSColor.redColor(), range: substringRange)
    }
})
print(attributedString)

Update for Swift 3:

let text = "😄😄😄Long paragraph saying!"
let nsText = text as NSString
let textRange = NSMakeRange(0, nsText.length)
let attributedString = NSMutableAttributedString(string: text)

nsText.enumerateSubstrings(in: textRange, options: .byWords, using: {
    (substring, substringRange, _, _) in

    if (substring == "saying") {
        attributedString.addAttribute(NSForegroundColorAttributeName, value: NSColor.red, range: substringRange)
    }
})
print(attributedString)

Update for Swift 4:

As of Swift 4 (Xcode 9), the Swift standard library provides method to convert between Range<String.Index> and NSRange. Converting to NSString is no longer necessary:

let text = "😄😄😄Long paragraph saying!"
let attributedString = NSMutableAttributedString(string: text)

text.enumerateSubstrings(in: text.startIndex..<text.endIndex, options: .byWords) {
    (substring, substringRange, _, _) in
    if substring == "saying" {
        attributedString.addAttribute(.foregroundColor, value: NSColor.red,
                                      range: NSRange(substringRange, in: text))
    }
}
print(attributedString)

Here substringRange is a Range<String.Index>, and that is converted to the corresponding NSRange with

NSRange(substringRange, in: text)
  • 57
    For anyone wanting to type emoji characters on OSX - Control-Command-space bar brings up a character picker – Jay Nov 20 '14 at 14:37
  • 2
    This doesn't work if I'm matching more than one word, and I'm not sure what the entire string to match is. Say I'm getting a string back from an API and using it within another string, and I want the string from the API to be underlined, I cannot guarantee that the substrings won't be in both the string from the API and the other string! Any ideas? – simonthumper Dec 14 '15 at 9:58
  • NSMakeRange Changed str.substringWithRange(Range<String.Index>(start: str.startIndex, end: str.endIndex)) //"Hello, playground" this the changes – HariKrishnan.P Jun 30 '16 at 10:20
  • (or) casting the string ---let substring = (string as NSString).substringWithRange(NSMakeRange(start, length)) – HariKrishnan.P Jun 30 '16 at 10:27
  • 2
    You mention that Range<String.Index> and NSString are not compatible. Are their counterparts also incompatible? I.e. are NSRange and String incompatible? Cause one of Apple's API specifically combines the two: matches(in:options:range:) – Senseful Jan 12 '17 at 0:36

For cases like the one you described, I found this to work. It's relatively short and sweet:

 let attributedString = NSMutableAttributedString(string: "follow the yellow brick road") //can essentially come from a textField.text as well (will need to unwrap though)
 let text = "follow the yellow brick road"
 let str = NSString(string: text) 
 let theRange = str.rangeOfString("yellow")
 attributedString.addAttribute(NSForegroundColorAttributeName, value: UIColor.yellowColor(), range: theRange)
  • 8
    attributedString.addAttribute won't work with a swift Range – Paludis Jul 7 '16 at 4:49
  • 5
    @Paludis, you are correct but this solution is not attempting to use a Swift range. It is using an NSRange. str is an NSString and therefore str.RangeOfString() returns an NSRange. – tjpaul Sep 9 '16 at 21:01
  • 3
    You can also remove the duplicate string in line 2 by replacing lines 2 and 3 with: let str = attributedString.string as NSString – Jason Moore Jan 5 '17 at 20:14
  • This is a localization nightmare. – Sulthan Nov 27 '17 at 22:51

Possible Solution

Swift provides distance() which measures the distance between start and end that can be used to create an NSRange:

let text = "Long paragraph saying something goes here!"
let textRange = text.startIndex..<text.endIndex
let attributedString = NSMutableAttributedString(string: text)

text.enumerateSubstringsInRange(textRange, options: NSStringEnumerationOptions.ByWords, { (substring, substringRange, enclosingRange, stop) -> () in
    let start = distance(text.startIndex, substringRange.startIndex)
    let length = distance(substringRange.startIndex, substringRange.endIndex)
    let range = NSMakeRange(start, length)

//    println("word: \(substring) - \(d1) to \(d2)")

        if (substring == "saying") {
            attributedString.addAttribute(NSForegroundColorAttributeName, value: NSColor.redColor(), range: range)
        }
})
  • 2
    Note: This can break if using characters like emoji in the string - See Martin's response. – Jay Nov 20 '14 at 14:23

The answers are fine, but with Swift 4 you could simplify your code a bit:

let text = "Test string"
let substring = "string"

let substringRange = text.range(of: substring)!
let nsRange = NSRange(substringRange, in: text)

Be cautions, as the result of range function has to be unwrapped.

Swift 4:

Sure, I know that Swift 4 has extension for NSRange already

public init<R, S>(_ region: R, in target: S) where R : RangeExpression,
    S : StringProtocol, 
    R.Bound == String.Index, S.Index == String.Index

I know in most cases this init is enough. See its usage:

let string = "Many animals here: 🐶🦇🐱 !!!"

if let range = string.range(of: "🐶🦇🐱"){
     print((string as NSString).substring(with: NSRange(range, in: string))) //  "🐶🦇🐱"
 }

But conversion can be done directly from Range< String.Index > to NSRange without Swift's String instance.

Instead of generic init usage which requires from you the target parameter as String and if you don't have target string at hand you can create conversion directly

extension NSRange {
    public init(_ range:Range<String.Index>) {
        self.init(location: range.lowerBound.encodedOffset,
              length: range.upperBound.encodedOffset -
                      range.lowerBound.encodedOffset) }
    }

or you can create specialized extension for Range itself

extension Range where Bound == String.Index {
    var nsRange:NSRange {
    return NSRange(location: self.lowerBound.encodedOffset,
                     length: self.upperBound.encodedOffset -
                             self.lowerBound.encodedOffset)
    }
}

Usage:

let string = "Many animals here: 🐶🦇🐱 !!!"
if let range = string.range(of: "🐶🦇🐱"){
    print((string as NSString).substring(with: NSRange(range))) //  "🐶🦇🐱"
}

or

if let nsrange = string.range(of: "🐶🦇🐱")?.nsRange{
    print((string as NSString).substring(with: nsrange)) //  "🐶🦇🐱"
}

For me this works perfectly:

let font = UIFont.systemFont(ofSize: 12, weight: .medium)
let text = "text"
let attString = NSMutableAttributedString(string: "exemple text :)")

attString.addAttributes([.font: font], range:(attString.string as NSString).range(of: text))

label.attributedText = attString

Swift 3 Extension Variant that preserves existing attributes.

extension UILabel {
  func setLineHeight(lineHeight: CGFloat) {
    guard self.text != nil && self.attributedText != nil else { return }
    var attributedString = NSMutableAttributedString()

    if let attributedText = self.attributedText {
      attributedString = NSMutableAttributedString(attributedString: attributedText)
    } else if let text = self.text {
      attributedString = NSMutableAttributedString(string: text)
    }

    let style = NSMutableParagraphStyle()
    style.lineSpacing = lineHeight
    style.alignment = self.textAlignment
    let str = NSString(string: attributedString.string)

    attributedString.addAttribute(NSParagraphStyleAttributeName,
                                  value: style,
                                  range: str.range(of: str as String))
    self.attributedText = attributedString
  }
}
func formatAttributedStringWithHighlights(text: String, highlightedSubString: String?, formattingAttributes: [String: AnyObject]) -> NSAttributedString {
    let mutableString = NSMutableAttributedString(string: text)

    let text = text as NSString         // convert to NSString be we need NSRange
    if let highlightedSubString = highlightedSubString {
        let highlightedSubStringRange = text.rangeOfString(highlightedSubString) // find first occurence
        if highlightedSubStringRange.length > 0 {       // check for not found
            mutableString.setAttributes(formattingAttributes, range: highlightedSubStringRange)
        }
    }

    return mutableString
}

I love the Swift language, but using NSAttributedString with a Swift Range that is not compatible with NSRange has made my head hurt for too long. So to get around all that garbage I devised the following methods to return an NSMutableAttributedString with the highlighted words set with your color.

This does not work for emojis. Modify if you must.

extension String {
    func getRanges(of string: String) -> [NSRange] {
        var ranges:[NSRange] = []
        if contains(string) {
            let words = self.components(separatedBy: " ")
            var position:Int = 0
            for word in words {
                if word.lowercased() == string.lowercased() {
                    let startIndex = position
                    let endIndex = word.characters.count
                    let range = NSMakeRange(startIndex, endIndex)
                    ranges.append(range)
                }
                position += (word.characters.count + 1) // +1 for space
            }
        }
        return ranges
    }
    func highlight(_ words: [String], this color: UIColor) -> NSMutableAttributedString {
        let attributedString = NSMutableAttributedString(string: self)
        for word in words {
            let ranges = getRanges(of: word)
            for range in ranges {
                attributedString.addAttributes([NSForegroundColorAttributeName: color], range: range)
            }
        }
        return attributedString
    }
}

Usage:

// The strings you're interested in
let string = "The dog ran after the cat"
let words = ["the", "ran"]

// Highlight words and get back attributed string
let attributedString = string.highlight(words, this: .yellow)

// Set attributed string
label.attributedText = attributedString

Swift 4

I think, there are two ways.

1. NSRange(range, in: )

2. NSRange(location:, length: )

Sample code:

let attributedString = NSMutableAttributedString(string: "Sample Text 12345", attributes: [.font : UIFont.systemFont(ofSize: 15.0)])

// NSRange(range, in: )
if let range = attributedString.string.range(of: "Sample")  {
    attributedString.addAttribute(.foregroundColor, value: UIColor.orange, range: NSRange(range, in: attributedString.string))
}

// NSRange(location: , length: )
if let range = attributedString.string.range(of: "12345") {
    attributedString.addAttribute(.foregroundColor, value: UIColor.green, range: NSRange(location: range.lowerBound.encodedOffset, length: range.upperBound.encodedOffset - range.lowerBound.encodedOffset))
}

Screen Shot: enter image description here

let text:String = "Hello Friend"

let searchRange:NSRange = NSRange(location:0,length: text.characters.count)

let range:Range`<Int`> = Range`<Int`>.init(start: searchRange.location, end: searchRange.length)
  • 4
    How about explaining your answer a bit, and preferably formatting the code properly? – SamB Aug 22 '16 at 1:52

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