53

How to check if a scope variable is undefined?

This does not work:

<p ng-show="foo == undefined">Show this if $scope.foo == undefined</p>
65

Here is the cleanest way to do this:

<p ng-show="{{foo === undefined}}">Show this if $scope.foo === undefined</p>

No need to create a helper function in the controller!

  • 8
    This is not reactive. Meaning when foo changes, ng-show does not change accordingly. – user409460 Apr 8 '16 at 12:57
  • 1
    curly braces should not be used with ng-show as it expression only. Curly braces are used for evaluating an expression inside an otherwise string text – Naren Aug 23 '17 at 8:07
24

Using undefined to make a decision is usually a sign of bad design in Javascript. You might consider doing something else.

However, to answer your question: I think the best way of doing so would be adding a helper function.

$scope.isUndefined = function (thing) {
    return (typeof thing === "undefined");
}

and in the template

<div ng-show="isUndefined(foo)"></div>
  • 4
    or you can use angular's helper function, angular.isUndefined(object) / angular.isDefined(object) – Bruno Peres Jul 16 '15 at 17:03
  • I would argue that not being able to handle an object with an undefined property is bad design front end code. – SSH This Apr 13 '17 at 19:46
9

Corrected:

HTML

  <p ng-show="getFooUndef(foo)">Show this if $scope.foo === undefined</p>

JS

$scope.foo = undefined;

$scope.getFooUndef = function(foo){
    return ( typeof foo === 'undefined' );
}

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/oakley349/vtcff0w5/1/

  • 3
    this will also show if foo is null or false – Naeem Shaikh Nov 20 '14 at 15:04
  • You're right, didn't think of it that way. Editing answer – Oakley Nov 20 '14 at 15:13
  • 2
    This is not correct either, since undefined is not a JavaScript keyword (it's a variable). See stackoverflow.com/questions/7173773/… – Josh Darnell Nov 20 '14 at 15:21
  • 3
    It is better practice to do return (foo === undefined); than return (typeof foo === 'undefined');. – volent Apr 1 '15 at 10:07
  • 1
    @Oakley Please note === operator itself check value and type as well. So you don't need to do complex code using typeof operator – dextermini Sep 27 '16 at 6:20
3

If foo is not a boolean variable then this would work (i.e. you want to show this when that variable has some data):

<p ng-show="!foo">Show this if $scope.foo is undefined</p>

And vise-versa:

<p ng-show="foo">Show this if $scope.foo is defined</p>

3

Posting new answer since Angular behavior has changed. Checking equality with undefined now works in angular expressions, at least as of 1.5, as the following code works:

ng-if="foo !== undefined"

When this ng-if evaluates to true, deleting the percentages property off the appropriate scope and calling $digest removes the element from the document, as you would expect.

1

If you're using Angular 1, I would recommend using Angular's built-in method:

angular.isDefined(value);

reference : https://docs.angularjs.org/api/ng/function/angular.isDefined

1

You can use the double pipe operation to check if the value is undefined the after statement:

<div ng-show="foo || false">
    Show this if foo is defined!
</div>
<div ng-show="boo || true">
    Show this if boo is undefined!
</div>

Check JSFiddle for demo

For technical explanation for the double pipe, I prefer to take a look on this link: https://stackoverflow.com/a/34707750/6225126

  • Um, no, that's not an equivalent to check whether it is actually undefined. Your example will fail if boo variable is 0, null, false, or just an empty string. – impulsgraw Aug 29 '18 at 11:12
1

As @impulsgraw wrote. You need to check for undefined after the pipes:

<div ng-show="foo || undefined">
    Show this if foo is defined!
</div>
<div ng-show="boo || !undefined">
    Show this if boo is undefined!
</div>

https://jsfiddle.net/mjfz2q9h/11/

-2

<p ng-show="angular.isUndefined(foo)">Show this if $scope.foo === undefined</p>

  • 5
    ??? this would only work if you put in your controller $scope.angular = angular – patrick Jun 15 '15 at 23:00

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