2

In python, we could do this,

class TT(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.f='ff'
x=TT()
print x.f

If I change the code to:

class TT(object):
    def__init__(uu):
        uu.f='ff'
x=TT()
print x.f

I will get the same results, both are 'ff'. Is 'uu' here just the alias for 'self'? Or any other difference? When should I use this?

Thanks.

4

There is no name for the object variable that is set in stone: you can use practically whatever name you want to identify it. However, to easily distinguish between the object variable and other passed variables, it is a commonly-adopted convention to name that variable "self", just to make it more readable for others who are examining your code.

You can technically use whatever name you want, but it is considered bad practice in the programming world.

2

It's not just __init__, it's all Python's methods: self is merely a convention. The first variable in the method will be the object itself, and it doesn't matter how you name it, self or uu or big_honcho or this; but if you use anything but self, people who read your code will likely be confused for a second or a thousand.

This is in contrast to many other OO languages which have an implicit variable for the current object, usually either self (e.g. Ruby) or this (e.g. JavaScript).

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