1

Is it possible to "sum" diverse enumerables when they are string mode? per example like this? (well, I know this doesn't work.)

(( 'a'..'z') + ('A'..'Z')).to_a

note: I am asking about getting an array of string chars from a to z and from A to Z all together. About string mode I mean that the chars will appears like ["a", "b", ..... , "Y", "Z"]

  • 3
    What is your expected result? An array of 52 elements (of all upcase and lowcase letters)? – Yu Hao Nov 21 '14 at 12:17
  • yes. Something like that. – RadW2020 Nov 21 '14 at 12:50
  • What would the expected output be? Are you asking how to lift the addition operation over the two Enumerables? And what is "string mode"? – Jörg W Mittag Nov 21 '14 at 12:57
  • I am asking about getting an array of string chars from a to z and from A to Z all together. About string mode I mean that the chars will appera like ["a", "b", ..... "Z"] – RadW2020 Nov 21 '14 at 13:07
  • 1
    Please don't hide crucial information like this away in a comment. Put it in the question, so one can see it. Now that you have finally produced an example of your desired output, it turns out that every single answer given so far is wrong, and you have wasted everybody's time by playing a guessing game. – Jörg W Mittag Nov 21 '14 at 13:18
9

You can use the splat operator:

[*('A'..'Z'), *( 'a'..'z')]
  • 3
    Even works without parenthesis: [*'A'..'Z', *'a'..'z'] – Stefan Nov 21 '14 at 13:34
  • Unfortunately, according to the updated question, this answer is no longer correct. – Jörg W Mittag Nov 21 '14 at 13:35
  • This is brilliant and works prefectly and elegantly for me. Sorry if my english have created misundertoods. – RadW2020 Nov 21 '14 at 17:46
4

Like this?

[('a'..'z'), ('A'..'Z')].map(&:to_a).flatten

Or this?

('a'..'z').to_a + ('A'..'Z').to_a
  • 3
    [('A'..'Z'), ('a'..'z')].flat_map(&:to_a) is shorter ;) – Yevgeniy Anfilofyev Nov 21 '14 at 12:36
  • You're right. I always forget flat_map... – spickermann Nov 21 '14 at 12:40
  • Unfortunately, according to the updated question, this answer is no longer correct. – Jörg W Mittag Nov 21 '14 at 13:36
  • It is correct for the pourpose of the array. You only need to swap the arrays to change the result. That is easy. The difficult is to figure out how to do this thing. – RadW2020 Nov 22 '14 at 13:23
2

Not answer but benchmarking of answers:

require 'benchmark'

n = 100000
Benchmark.bm do |x|
  x.report("flat_map   : ") { n.times do ; [('A'..'Z'), ('a'..'z')].flat_map(&:to_a) ; end }
  x.report("map.flatten: ") { n.times do ; [('A'..'Z'), ('a'..'z')].map(&:to_a).flatten ; end }
  x.report("splat      : ") { n.times do ; [*('A'..'Z'), *( 'a'..'z')] ; end }
  x.report("concat arr : ") { n.times do ; ('A'..'Z').to_a + ('a'..'z').to_a  ; end }
end

Result:

#=>       user     system      total        real
#=> flat_map   :   0.858000   0.000000   0.858000 (  0.883630)
#=> map.flatten:   1.170000   0.016000   1.186000 (  1.200421)
#=> splat      :   0.858000   0.000000   0.858000 (  0.857728)
#=> concat arr :   0.812000   0.000000   0.812000 (  0.822861)
  • Unfortunately, according to the updated question, this answer is no longer correct. – Jörg W Mittag Nov 21 '14 at 13:36
  • Why do you say that? All four options do the same and perfectly for the purpose of the question asked. – RadW2020 Nov 21 '14 at 17:55
  • @RadW2020: Well, you changed your question to ask about the exact opposite order than you did before. When I wrote my answer and wrote that comment, your question asked about how to get the arrays in the reverse order. Now, your question asks about how to get them in the order they appear. Of course, anything written before you made that change will make absolutely no sense whatsoever anymore. – Jörg W Mittag Nov 22 '14 at 12:02
  • @JörgWMittag : Well, I could edit the question and put that the order is not important for the purpose of the array and then it will make sense again, I think people can understand that. – RadW2020 Nov 22 '14 at 12:40
0

Since you want the elements from the first Range to be at the end of the output Array and the elements of the last Range to be at the beginning of the output Array, but still keep the same order within each Range, I would do it like this (which also generalizes nicely to more than two Enumerables):

def backwards_concat(*enums)
  enums.reverse.map(&:to_a).inject([], &:concat)
end

backwards_concat('A'..'Z', 'a'..'z')
0
['a'..'z'].concat(['A'..'Z'])

This is probably the quickest way to do this.

  • thats wrong. This is your output "a..zA..Z". concat is for strings. – RadW2020 Nov 21 '14 at 17:44
0

About string mode I mean that the chars will appears like ["a", "b", ..... , "Y", "Z"]

To answer the above:

Array('a'..'z').concat Array('A'..'Z')

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