272

How can I include files from outside of Docker's build context using the "ADD" command in the Docker file?

From the Docker documentation:

The path must be inside the context of the build; you cannot ADD ../something/something, because the first step of a docker build is to send the context directory (and subdirectories) to the docker daemon.

I do not want to restructure my whole project just to accommodate Docker in this matter. I want to keep all my Docker files in the same sub-directory.

Also, it appears Docker does not yet (and may not ever) support symlinks: Dockerfile ADD command does not follow symlinks on host #1676.

The only other thing I can think of is to include a pre-build step to copy the files into the Docker build context (and configure my version control to ignore those files). Is there a better workaround for than that?

  • 24
    This has got to be the worst thing about Docker. From my point of view, there is no such thing as a "Docker project". Docker is for shipping projects. Its just a tool. I don't want to have to rebuild my whole project to accomadte docker, adding .dockerignore etc. At the end of the day, who knows how long Docker will last? It would be great to have a seperation between code (i.e. angular project), and whatever means to deploy it (i.e. docker). After all, there really is no benefit to having a docker file next to everything else. Its just wiring things up in order to create an image :( – TigerBear Jan 15 '18 at 20:55
  • Yeah, this is a big downer. I'm facing the same issue and I have a larger sized binary file (already compressed) that I don't want to copy into each Docker build context. I'd rather source it from its current location (outside the Docker build context). And I don't want to map a volume at run time, because I'm trying to COPY/ADD the file at build-time and unzip and do what I need so certain binaries are baked into the image. This way spinning up the containers are quick. – jersey bean Mar 22 '18 at 20:42
  • I found a good structure and I explain with details at stackoverflow.com/a/53298446/433814 – Marcello de Sales Nov 14 '18 at 11:02
250

The best way to work around this is to specify the Dockerfile independently of the build context, using -f.

For instance, this command will give the ADD command access to anything in your current directory.

docker build -f docker-files/Dockerfile .

Update: Docker now allows having the Dockerfile outside the build context (fixed in 18.03.0-ce, https://github.com/docker/cli/pull/886). So you can also do something like

docker build -f ../Dockerfile .
  • 6
    @Ro. you use the dockerfile: property in the build: section in the Compose file docs.docker.com/compose/compose-file/#/compose-file-reference – Emerson Farrugia Jul 9 '16 at 10:35
  • 2
    I get "The Dockerfile must be within the build context" - I'd really like to have one Dockerfile that can reside below the current build context. In your example you have the Dockerfile within/below the current build context, which of course, works. – Alexander Mills Feb 4 '17 at 9:38
  • 3
    Yeah I just want a shared Dockerfile which corresponds to multiple subdirectories, all of which are "build contexts" – Alexander Mills Feb 6 '17 at 17:30
  • 21
    Does this solve the OP's problem of wanting to ADD a file that is outside the context directory? That's what I'm trying to do but I don't think using -f makes external files addable. – Sridhar-Sarnobat Sep 19 '17 at 2:25
  • 7
    Can't upvote this enough.. in my docker-compose.yml I have: build: context: .., dockerfile: dir/Dockerfile. Now my build context is the parent directory! – Mike Gleason jr Couturier Jul 12 '18 at 12:49
38

On Linux you can mount other directories instead of symlinking them

mount --bind olddir newdir

See https://superuser.com/questions/842642 for more details.

I don't know if something similar is available for other OSes. I also tried using Samba to share a folder and remount it into the Docker context which worked as well.

36

I often find myself utilizing the --build-arg option for this purpose. For example after putting the following in the Dockerfile:

ARG SSH_KEY
RUN echo "$SSH_KEY" > /root/.ssh/id_rsa

You can just do:

docker build -t some-app --build-arg SSH_KEY="$(cat ~/file/outside/build/context/id_rsa)" .

But note the following warning from the Docker documentation:

Warning: It is not recommended to use build-time variables for passing secrets like github keys, user credentials etc. Build-time variable values are visible to any user of the image with the docker history command.

  • This is a really handy workaround for single config files outside the build context -- thank you! – jocull Jun 11 '18 at 18:27
  • Nice workaround !! – JRichardsz Sep 5 '18 at 16:04
  • 2
    This is poor advice without a huge warning. From the Docker documentation: "Warning: It is not recommended to use build-time variables for passing secrets like github keys, user credentials etc. Build-time variable values are visible to any user of the image with the docker history command." [1] In other words, the example given in this example discloses the private SSH key in the docker image. In some contexts, that might be fine. docs.docker.com/engine/reference/builder/#arg – sheldonh Jan 16 at 16:26
17

If you read the discussion in the issue 2745 not only docker may never support symlinks they may never support adding files outside your context. Seems to be a design philosophy that files that go into docker build should explicitly be part of its context or be from a URL where it is presumably deployed too with a fixed version so that the build is repeatable with well known URLs or files shipped with the docker container.

I prefer to build from a version controlled source - ie docker build -t stuff http://my.git.org/repo - otherwise I'm building from some random place with random files.

fundamentally, no.... -- SvenDowideit, Docker Inc

Just my opinion but I think you should restructure to separate out the code and docker repositories. That way the containers can be generic and pull in any version of the code at run time rather than build time.

Alternatively, use docker as your fundamental code deployment artifact and then you put the dockerfile in the root of the code repository. if you go this route probably makes sense to have a parent docker container for more general system level details and a child container for setup specific to your code.

11

I spent a good time trying to figure out a good pattern and how to better explain what's going on with this feature support. I realized that the best way to explain it was as follows...

  • Dockerfile: Will only see files under its own relative path
  • Context: a place in "space" where the files you want to share and your Dockerfile will be copied to

So, with that said, here's an example of the Dockerfile that needs to reuse a file called start.sh

Dockerfile

It ALWAYS will load from its relative path, having the current dir of itself as the local reference to the paths you specify.

COPY start.sh /runtime/start.sh

Files

Considering this idea, we can think of having multiple copies for the Dockerfiles building specific things, but they all need access to the start.sh.

./all-services/
   /start.sh
   /service-X/Dockerfile
   /service-Y/Dockerfile
   /service-Z/Dockerfile
./docker-compose.yaml

Considering this structure and the files above, here's a docker-compose.yml

docker-compose.yaml

  • In this example, your shared context dir is the runtime dir.
    • Same mental model here, think that all the files under this dir are moved over to the so-called context.
    • Similarly, just specify the Dockerfile that you want to copy to that same dir. You can specify that using dockerfile.
  • the directory where your main content is located is the actual context to be set.

The docker-compose.yml is as follows

version: "3.3"
services:

  service-A
    build:
      context: ./all-service
      dockerfile: ./service-A/Dockerfile

  service-B
    build:
      context: ./all-service
      dockerfile: ./service-B/Dockerfile

  service-C
    build:
      context: ./all-service
      dockerfile: ./service-C/Dockerfile
  • all-service is set as the context, the shared file start.sh is copied there as well the Dockerfile specified by each dockerfile.
  • Each gets to be built their own way, sharing the start file!

Cheers!

  • Your point on Dockerfile is not completly true, as pointed by the accepted answer, if you are in a folder hierarchy a/b/c, then yes running docker build . in c won't allow you to access ../file-in-b. But, I think the general misundertanding in this (or at least mine was) is that the context is defined by the location stated by the first argument of the build command, not by the location of the Dockerfile. So as stated in the accepted answer: from a: docker build -f a/b/c/Dockerfile . means that in the Dockerfile . is now the folder a – b.enoit.be Feb 21 at 10:26
6

I believe the simpler workaround would be to change the 'context' itself.

So, for example, instead of giving:

docker build -t hello-demo-app .

which sets the current directory as the context, let's say you wanted the parent directory as the context, just use:

docker build -t hello-demo-app ..
  • 1
    I think this breaks .dockerignore :-\ – NullVoxPopuli Mar 9 '18 at 23:25
2

You can also create a tarball of what the image needs first and use that as your context.

https://docs.docker.com/engine/reference/commandline/build/#/tarball-contexts

0

I had this same issue with a project and some data files that I wasn't able to move inside the repo context for HIPPA reasons. I ended up using 2 Dockerfiles. One builds the main application without the stuff I needed outside the container and publishes that to internal repo. Then a second dockerfile pulls that image and adds the data and creates a new image which is then deployed and never stored anywhere. Not ideal, but it worked for my purposes of keeping sensitive information out of the repo.

0

Using docker-compose, I accomplished this by creating a service that mounts the volumes that I need and committing the image of the container. Then, in the subsequent service, I rely on the previously committed image, which has all of the data stored at mounted locations. You will then have have to copy these files to their ultimate destination, as host mounted directories do not get committed when running a docker commit command

You don't have to use docker-compose to accomplish this, but it makes life a bit easier

# docker-compose.yml

version: '3'
  services:
    stage:
      image: alpine
      volumes:
        - /host/machine/path:/tmp/container/path
      command: bash -c "cp -r /tmp/container/path /final/container/path"
    setup:
      image: stage
# setup.sh

# Start "stage" service
docker-compose up stage

# Commit changes to an image named "stage"
docker commit $(docker-compose ps -q stage) stage

# Start setup service off of stage image
docker-compose up setup

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