5

I use lxml to retrieve the attributes of tags from an html page. The html page is formatted like this:

<div class="my_div">
    <a href="/foobar">
        <img src="my_img.png">
    </a>
</div>

The python script I use to retrieve the url inside the <a> tag and the src value of the <img> tag inside the same <div>, is this:

from lxml import html 

...
tree = html.fromstring(page.text)
for element in tree.xpath('//div[contains(@class, "my_div")]//a'):
    href = element.xpath('/@href')
    src = element.xpath('//img/@src')

Why don't I get the strings?

3 Answers 3

10

You are using lxml so you are operating with lxml objects - HtmlElement instances. HtmlElement is nested from etree.Element: http://lxml.de/api/lxml.etree._Element-class.html, it have get method, that returns attrubute value. So the proper way for you is:

from lxml import html 

...
tree = html.fromstring(page.text)
for link_element in tree.xpath('//div[contains(@class, "my_div")]//a'):
    href = link_element.get('href')
    image_element = href.find('img')
    if image_element:
        img_src = image_element.get('src') 
0

If you change your code to:

from lxml import html 

...
tree = html.fromstring(page.text)
for element in tree.xpath('//div[contains(@class, "my_div")]//a'):
    href = element.items()[0][1]  #gives you the value corresponding to the key "href"
    src = element.xpath('//img/@src')[0]
    print(href, src)

You'll get what you need.

The documentation of lxml mentions some of these things, but I feel it is lacking a few things and you might want to consider using an interactive python shell to study the properties of the instances returned by tree.xpath(). Or you could look into another parser completely, such as BeautifulSoup, which has very good examples and documentation. Just sharing...

2
  • I do agree and disagree, lxml might not be the best for xpath handling, however above all, it's a very easy to use, fast and robust html/xml parser. BeautifulSoup doesn't come with a parser itself, it uses Python standard library (which is comparably slower than lxml), but can be configured to use 3rd party like lxml, even their doc suggests installing lxml for speed. But I do agree that BeautifulSoup is rather well documented and easy to learn.
    – Anzel
    Nov 22, 2014 at 4:00
  • @Anzel, I agree with everything you said. Indeed, BeautifulSoup mentions that lxml is a fast library and should not be overlooked. It's just that documentation, often the best source of examples, plays a big part in a library's adoption by the community. Point in case: the amount of BeautifulSoup tagged questions vs those tagged lxml (~2/1).
    – Oliver W.
    Nov 22, 2014 at 9:01
0

The reason why you didn't get the results you want is because you're trying to get attributes from the NEXT children rather than the existing node.

See this:

from lxml import html

s = '''<div class="my_div">
    <a href="/foobar">
        <img src="my_img.png">
    </a>
</div>'''

tree = html.fromstring(s)

# when you do path... //a, you are ALREADY at 'a' node
for el in tree.xpath('//div[contains(@class, "my_div")]//a'):
    # you were trying to get next children /@href, which doesn't exist
    print el.xpath('@href') # you should instead access the existing node's 
    print el.xpath('img/@src') # same here, not /img/@src ...

['/foobar']
['my_img.png']

Hope this helps.

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