3

I'm not sure if something like this is possible through CSS, but then again the talented folks in this community have proven me wrong numerous of times so here we go!

I was wondering if it is possible for certain horizontal parts of the letters O, U, and E can respond with with the window's width while maintaining its position? On the image below, I have drawn out how the responsive typography reacts to the window scale. Please note that the set type are placed within a page-wrap and placed vertically in the middle of the window.

enter image description here

How might I accomplish this? And should what format should I work with (svg, shapes, etc.)

Thank you in advance!

  • It's going to be an SVG and CSS mix for this one, I promise. – Josh Burgess Nov 21 '14 at 22:54
  • Hi @JoshBurgess -- Could you suggest how might I approach this goal? I know how to make SVGs and turn them into points so that the html won't have to call the SVG, but do you have any idea how I can make the responsive (marked in blue) somehow snap with the non-responsive parts of the text (marked in green?) – kenhimself Nov 21 '14 at 22:57
  • You can do it simply by just having overlaid divs inside a clipping div: the extended letter shapes are created with SVG, floated right and hidden underneath the left hand divs. When the user resizes the window, the right div slides out revealing the elongated parts. – Michael Mullany Nov 22 '14 at 23:02
  • Hi @Michael Mullany — Thanks for the feed back! Im curious to see what a clipping div is, it sound like exactly what I'm looking for! Do you know of any websites or jsfiddle examples that use it? – kenhimself Nov 24 '14 at 0:17
  • It's just overflow:hidden – Michael Mullany Nov 24 '14 at 0:36
2

You can do it simply by just having overlaid elements inside a div with overflow:hidden: the extended letter shapes are created with SVG, and hidden underneath the left hand divs. When the user resizes the window, the right div slides out revealing the elongated parts. eg.

<div id="clipper">
 <svg id="leftpart" x="0px" y="0px" width="30px" height="150px">
  <rect x="0" y="0" width="30" height="150" fill="red"/>
 </svg>

 <svg id="rightpart" x="0px" y="0px" width="2000px" height="150px">

     <rect  x="0" y="0" width="2000" height="30" fill="black"/>
     <rect  x="0" y="60" width="2000" height="30" fill="black"/>
     <rect  x="0" y="120" width="2000" height="30" fill="black"/>
 </svg> 
</div>


#clipper{
  position: absolute;
  top:200px;
  left:200px;
  width:40%;
  overflow: hidden;

}

#rightpart {
  position: relative;
  z-index:1;
}

#leftpart {
  position: absolute;
  z-index:2;

}
  • You, @Michael Mullany, are a flip'n genius. Such a simple solution — I definitely over-thought this. I changed and added a few lines of code and got exactly what I needed. Many thanks, you rock! I have marked your solution as the answer. – kenhimself Nov 24 '14 at 2:23
0

Here is an example of scaling SVG elements based on screen width. This would depend on having a way to select the character elements you're trying to modify (for instance, the bottom of the bowl of the U). In this example, the rectangle element has a unique ID.

HTML:

<svg version="1.1"
     baseProfile="full"
     width="200" height="200"
     xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg">

  <rect id="foo" height="100" width="100" />

</svg>

CSS:

#foo {
    fill: #f00;
    transform: scaleX(0.5);
}

@media only screen and (min-width: 500px) {
    #foo {
        transform: scaleX(2);
    }
}

http://jsfiddle.net/bangarang/tgcw1fop/

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