I was studying the Decorator Pattern as documented in GOF.

Please, help me understand the Decorator Pattern. Could someone give a use-case example of where this is useful in the real world?

12 Answers 12

up vote 201 down vote accepted

Decorator pattern achieves a single objective of dynamically adding responsibilities to any object.

Consider a case of a pizza shop. In the pizza shop they will sell few pizza varieties and they will also provide toppings in the menu. Now imagine a situation wherein if the pizza shop has to provide prices for each combination of pizza and topping. Even if there are four basic pizzas and 8 different toppings, the application would go crazy maintaining all these concrete combination of pizzas and toppings.

Here comes the decorator pattern.

As per the decorator pattern, you will implement toppings as decorators and pizzas will be decorated by those toppings' decorators. Practically each customer would want toppings of his desire and final bill-amount will be composed of the base pizzas and additionally ordered toppings. Each topping decorator would know about the pizzas that it is decorating and it's price. GetPrice() method of Topping object would return cumulative price of both pizza and the topping.

EDIT

Here's a code-example of explanation above.

public abstract class BasePizza
{
    protected double myPrice;

    public virtual double GetPrice()
    {
        return this.myPrice;
    }
}

public abstract class ToppingsDecorator : BasePizza
{
    protected BasePizza pizza;
    public ToppingsDecorator(BasePizza pizzaToDecorate)
    {
        this.pizza = pizzaToDecorate;
    }

    public override double GetPrice()
    {
        return (this.pizza.GetPrice() + this.myPrice);
    }
}

class Program
{
    [STAThread]
    static void Main()
    {
        //Client-code
        Margherita pizza = new Margherita();
        Console.WriteLine("Plain Margherita: " + pizza.GetPrice().ToString());

        ExtraCheeseTopping moreCheese = new ExtraCheeseTopping(pizza);
        ExtraCheeseTopping someMoreCheese = new ExtraCheeseTopping(moreCheese);
        Console.WriteLine("Plain Margherita with double extra cheese: " + someMoreCheese.GetPrice().ToString());

        MushroomTopping moreMushroom = new MushroomTopping(someMoreCheese);
        Console.WriteLine("Plain Margherita with double extra cheese with mushroom: " + moreMushroom.GetPrice().ToString());

        JalapenoTopping moreJalapeno = new JalapenoTopping(moreMushroom);
        Console.WriteLine("Plain Margherita with double extra cheese with mushroom with Jalapeno: " + moreJalapeno.GetPrice().ToString());

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

public class Margherita : BasePizza
{
    public Margherita()
    {
        this.myPrice = 6.99;
    }
}

public class Gourmet : BasePizza
{
    public Gourmet()
    {
        this.myPrice = 7.49;
    }
}

public class ExtraCheeseTopping : ToppingsDecorator
{
    public ExtraCheeseTopping(BasePizza pizzaToDecorate)
        : base(pizzaToDecorate)
    {
        this.myPrice = 0.99;
    }
}

public class MushroomTopping : ToppingsDecorator
{
    public MushroomTopping(BasePizza pizzaToDecorate)
        : base(pizzaToDecorate)
    {
        this.myPrice = 1.49;
    }
}

public class JalapenoTopping : ToppingsDecorator
{
    public JalapenoTopping(BasePizza pizzaToDecorate)
        : base(pizzaToDecorate)
    {
        this.myPrice = 1.49;
    }
}
  • 87
    Do not like this pattern one bit. Maybe it's the example though. The main issue I have with it in terms of OOD is that a topping is not a pizza. Asking the topping for the price of the pizza it's applied to just doesn't sit right with me. It's a very thoughtful and detailed example though, so I don't mean to knock you for that. – Tom W Dec 8 '10 at 8:27
  • 29
    @TomW I think part of the issue is the naming. All of the "Topping" classes should be called "PizzaWith<Topping>". For example, "PizzaWithMushrooms". – Josh Noe Aug 19 '13 at 18:58
  • 2
    In my opinion, decorators are best used as flatly as possible. By that I mean as little "decorators wrapping decorators" as possible. So perhaps this example isn't the most apt. But it is quite thorough, which is nice. – thekingoftruth Oct 21 '13 at 20:21
  • 13
    From another perspective this is not even close to "real world". In the real world you should not recompile each time you need to add a new topping in menu (or change the price). Toppings are (usually) stored in database and thus render the above example useless. – Stelios Adamantidis Oct 8 '15 at 13:06
  • 2
    ^ This. I think this is what's been bothering me all along while studying this pattern. If I was a software company and wrote pizza shop software, I wouldn't want to have to recompile and reship every time. I'd want to add a row in a table in the backend or something that would easily take care of their requirement. Well said, @Stelios Adamantidis. I guess the patterns biggest strength though would be modifying 3rd-party classes then. – canucklesandwich Dec 9 '15 at 1:16

This is a simple example of adding new behavior to an existing object dynamically, or the Decorator pattern. Due to the nature of dynamic languages such as Javascript, this pattern becomes part of the language itself.

// create a message object
var message = {
    text: "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit..."
};

// add logging behavior to the message object dynamically
message.log = function() {
    console.log(this.text);
};

// use the newly added behavior to log text
​message.log();​ // Loren ipsum...​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

It's worth noting that the Java i/o model is based on the decorator pattern. The layering of this reader on top of that reader on top of...is a really real world example of decorator.

  • Are there any other examples in real public APIs? This is the only one I know. – Josiah Yoder Jan 9 at 22:29
  • It seems that all wrapper functions in nature has some sort of decorator pattern build in, is that what I think it is? – Harvey Lin Apr 23 at 3:42

Example - Scenario- Let's say you are writing an encryption module. This encryption can encrypt the clear file using DES - Data encryption standard. Similarly, in a system you can have the encryption as AES - Advance encryption standard. Also, you can have the combination of encryption - First DES, then AES. Or you can have first AES, then DES.

Discussion- How will you cater this situation? You cannot keep creating the object of such combinations - for example - AES and DES - total of 4 combinations. Thus, you need to have 4 individual objects This will become complex as the encryption type will increase.

Solution - Keep building up the stack - combinations depending on the need - at run time. Another advantage of this stack approach is that you can unwind it easily.

Here is the solution - in C++.

Firstly, you need a base class - a fundamental unit of the stack. You can think as the base of the stack. In this example, it is clear file. Let's follow always polymorphism. Make first an interface class of this fundamental unit. This way,you can implement it as you wish. Also, you don't need to have think of dependency while including this fundamental unit.

Here is the interface class -

class IclearData
{
public:

    virtual std::string getData() = 0;
    virtual ~IclearData() = 0;
};

IclearData::~IclearData()
{
    std::cout<<"Destructor called of IclearData"<<std::endl;
}

Now, implement this interface class -

class clearData:public IclearData
{
private:

    std::string m_data;

    clearData();

    void setData(std::string data)
        {
            m_data = data;
        }

public:

    std::string getData()
    {
        return m_data;
    }

    clearData(std::string data)
    {
        setData(data);
    }

    ~clearData()
    {
        std::cout<<"Destructor of clear Data Invoked"<<std::endl;
    }

};

Now, let's make a decorator abstract class - that can be extended to create any kind of flavours - here the flavour is the encryption type. This decorator abstract class is related to the base class. Thus, the decorator "is a" kind of interface class. Thus, you need to use inheritance.

class encryptionDecorator: public IclearData
{

protected:
    IclearData *p_mclearData;

    encryptionDecorator()
    {
      std::cout<<"Encryption Decorator Abstract class called"<<std::endl;
    }

public:

    std::string getData()
    {
        return p_mclearData->getData();
    }

    encryptionDecorator(IclearData *clearData)
    {
        p_mclearData = clearData;
    }

    virtual std::string showDecryptedData() = 0;

    virtual ~encryptionDecorator() = 0;

};

encryptionDecorator::~encryptionDecorator()
{
    std::cout<<"Encryption Decorator Destructor called"<<std::endl;
}

Now, let's make a concrete decorator class - Encryption type - AES -

const std::string aesEncrypt = "AES Encrypted ";

class aes: public encryptionDecorator
{

private:

    std::string m_aesData;

    aes();

public:

    aes(IclearData *pClearData): m_aesData(aesEncrypt)
    {
        p_mclearData = pClearData;
        m_aesData.append(p_mclearData->getData());
    }

    std::string getData()
        {
            return m_aesData;
        }

    std::string showDecryptedData(void)
    {
        m_aesData.erase(0,m_aesData.length());
        return m_aesData;
    }

};

Now, let's say the decorator type is DES -

const std::string desEncrypt = "DES Encrypted ";

class des: public encryptionDecorator
{

private:

    std::string m_desData;

    des();

public:

    des(IclearData *pClearData): m_desData(desEncrypt)
    {
        p_mclearData = pClearData;
        m_desData.append(p_mclearData->getData());
    }

    std::string getData(void)
        {
            return m_desData;
        }

    std::string showDecryptedData(void)
    {
        m_desData.erase(0,desEncrypt.length());
        return m_desData;
    }

};

Let's make a client code to use this decorator class -

int main()
{
    IclearData *pData = new clearData("HELLO_CLEAR_DATA");

    std::cout<<pData->getData()<<std::endl;


    encryptionDecorator *pAesData = new aes(pData);

    std::cout<<pAesData->getData()<<std::endl;

    encryptionDecorator *pDesData = new des(pAesData);

    std::cout<<pDesData->getData()<<std::endl;

    /** unwind the decorator stack ***/
    std::cout<<pDesData->showDecryptedData()<<std::endl;

    delete pDesData;
    delete pAesData;
    delete pData;

    return 0;
}

You will see the following results -

HELLO_CLEAR_DATA
Encryption Decorator Abstract class called
AES Encrypted HELLO_CLEAR_DATA
Encryption Decorator Abstract class called
DES Encrypted AES Encrypted HELLO_CLEAR_DATA
AES Encrypted HELLO_CLEAR_DATA
Encryption Decorator Destructor called
Destructor called of IclearData
Encryption Decorator Destructor called
Destructor called of IclearData
Destructor of clear Data Invoked
Destructor called of IclearData

Here is the UML diagram - Class representation of it. In case, you want to skip the code and focus on the design aspect.

enter image description here

  • 1
    isn't the example more suited for strategy pattern ? – exexzian Aug 8 '17 at 17:04
  • @exexzian Yes, my students consistently suggest a list of strategies to me for this type of problem, and it feels like the cleanest solution to me, too. – Josiah Yoder Jan 9 at 22:30

What is Decorator Design Pattern in Java.

The formal definition of the Decorator pattern from the GoF book (Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software, 1995, Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Pearson Addison Wesley) says you can,

"Attach additional responsibilities to an object dynamically. Decorators provide a flexible alternative to subclassing for extending functionality."

Let's say we have a Pizza and we want to decorate it with toppings such as Chicken Masala, Onion and Mozzarella Cheese. Let's see how to implement it in Java ...

Program to demonstrate how to implement Decorator Design Pattern in Java.

Pizza.java:

<!-- language-all: lang-html -->

package com.hubberspot.designpattern.structural.decorator;

public class Pizza {

public Pizza() {

}

public String description(){
    return "Pizza";
}

}



package com.hubberspot.designpattern.structural.decorator;

public abstract class PizzaToppings extends Pizza {

public abstract String description();

}

package com.hubberspot.designpattern.structural.decorator;

public class ChickenMasala extends PizzaToppings {

private Pizza pizza;

public ChickenMasala(Pizza pizza) {
    this.pizza = pizza;
}

@Override
public String description() {
    return pizza.description() + " with chicken masala, ";
}

}



package com.hubberspot.designpattern.structural.decorator;

public class MozzarellaCheese extends PizzaToppings {

private Pizza pizza;

public MozzarellaCheese(Pizza pizza) {
    this.pizza = pizza;
}

@Override
public String description() {
    return pizza.description() + "and mozzarella cheese.";
}
}



package com.hubberspot.designpattern.structural.decorator;

public class Onion extends PizzaToppings {

private Pizza pizza;

public Onion(Pizza pizza) {
    this.pizza = pizza;
}

@Override
public String description() {
    return pizza.description() + "onions, ";
}

}



package com.hubberspot.designpattern.structural.decorator;

public class TestDecorator {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    Pizza pizza = new Pizza();

    pizza = new ChickenMasala(pizza);
    pizza = new Onion(pizza);
    pizza = new MozzarellaCheese(pizza);

    System.out.println("You're getting " + pizza.description());

}

}

Decorator pattern helps you to change or configure a functionality of your object by chaining with other similar subclasses of this object.

Best example would be InputStream and OutputStream classes in java.io package

    File file=new File("target","test.txt");
    FileOutputStream fos=new FileOutputStream(file);
    BufferedOutputStream bos=new BufferedOutputStream(fos);
    ObjectOutputStream oos=new ObjectOutputStream(bos);


    oos.write(5);
    oos.writeBoolean(true);
    oos.writeBytes("decorator pattern was here.");


//... then close the streams of course.
  • In this case, the calling chain starts at ObjectOutputStream, then goes all the way up to the File class, then File class returns the value, then the other three subclasses adds them all up and finally, the value of ObjectOutputStream's method returns it, is that correct? – Harvey Lin Apr 23 at 3:46

I've used Decorator pattern extensively at my work. I made a post on my blog about how to use it with logging.

Decorator pattern achieves a single objective of dynamically adding responsibilities to any object.

Java I/O Model is based on decorator pattern.

Java IO as decorator pattern

The decorator pattern lets you dynamically add behavior to objects.

Let's take an example where you need to build an app that calculates the price of different kinds of burgers. You need to handle different variations of burgers, such as "large" or "with cheese", each of which has a price relative to the basic burger. E.g. add $10 for burger with cheese, add extra $15 for large burger, etc.

In this case you might be tempted to create subclasses to handle these. We might express this in Ruby as:

class Burger
  def price
    50
  end
end

class BurgerWithCheese < Burger
  def price
    super + 15
  end
end

In the above example, the BurgerWithCheese class inherits from Burger, and overrides the price method to add $15 to the price defined in the super class. You would also create a LargeBurger class and define the price relative to Burger. But you also need to define a new class for the combination of "large" and "with cheese".

Now what happens if we need to serve "burger with fries"? We already have 4 classes to handle those combinations, and we will need to add 4 more to handle all combination of the 3 properties - "large", "with cheese" and "with fries". We need 8 classes now. Add another property and we'll need 16. This will grow as 2^n.

Instead, let's try defining a BurgerDecorator that takes in a Burger object:

class BurgerDecorator
  def initialize(burger)
    self.burger = burger
  end
end

class BurgerWithCheese < BurgerDecorator
  def price
    self.burger.price + 15
  end
end

burger = Burger.new
cheese_burger = BurgerWithCheese.new(burger)
cheese_burger.price   # => 65

In the above example, we've created a BurgerDecorator class, from which BurgerWithCheese class inherits. We can also represent the "large" variation by creating LargeBurger class. Now we could define a large burger with cheese at runtime as:

b = LargeBurger.new(cheese_burger)
b.price  # => 50 + 15 + 20 = 85

Remember how using inheritance to add the "with fries" variation would involve adding 4 more subclasses? With decorators, we would just create one new class, BurgerWithFries, to handle the new variation and handle this at runtime. Each new property would need just more decorator to cover all the permutations.

PS. This is the short version of an article I wrote about using the Decorator Pattern in Ruby, which you can read if you wish to find out more detailed examples.

There is a example on Wikipedia about decorating a window with scrollbar:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decorator_pattern

Here is another very 'real world' example of "Team member, team lead and manager", which illustrates that decorator pattern is irreplaceable with simple inheritance:

https://zishanbilal.wordpress.com/2011/04/28/design-patterns-by-examples-decorator-pattern/

  • That Zishan Bilal link is great - best example I've seen – stonedauwg Dec 27 '16 at 21:09

Decorator:

  1. Add behaviour to object at run time. Inheritance is the key to achieve this functionality, which is both advantage and disadvantage of this pattern.
  2. It enhances the behaviour of interface.
  3. Decorator can be viewed as a degenerate Composite with only one component. However, a Decorator adds additional responsibilities - it isn't intended for object aggregation.
  4. The Decorator class declares a composition relationship to the LCD (Lowest Class Denominator) interface, and this data member is initialized in its constructor.
  5. Decorator is designed to let you add responsibilities to objects without sub-classing

Refer to sourcemaking article for more details.

Decorator (Abstract) : it is an abstract class/interface, which implements the component interface. It contains Component interface. In absence of this class, you need many sub-classes of ConcreteDecorators for different combinations. Composition of component reduces un-necessary sub-classes.

JDK example:

BufferedInputStream bis = new BufferedInputStream(new FileInputStream(new File("a.txt")));
while(bis.available()>0)
{
        char c = (char)bis.read();
        System.out.println("Char: "+c);;
}

Have a look at below SE question for UML diagram and code examples.

Decorator Pattern for IO

Useful articles:

journaldev

wikipedia

Real word example of Decorator pattern: VendingMachineDecorator has been explained @

When to Use the Decorator Pattern?

Beverage beverage = new SugarDecorator(new LemonDecorator(new Tea("Assam Tea")));
beverage.decorateBeverage();

beverage = new SugarDecorator(new LemonDecorator(new Coffee("Cappuccino")));
beverage.decorateBeverage();

In above example, Tea or Coffee ( Beverage) has been decorated by Sugar and Lemon.

Decorator Design Pattern: This pattern helps to modify the characteristics of an object at runtime. It provides different flavours to an object and gives flexibility to choose what ingredients we want to use in that flavour.

Real Life Example: Lets say you have a main cabin seat in a flight. Now you are allowed to choose multiple amenities with the seat. Each amenity has its own cost associated with it. Now if a user chooses Wifi and premium food, he/she will be charged for seat + wifi + premium food.

enter image description here

In this case decorator design pattern can really help us. Visit the above link to understand more about decorator pattern and implementation of one real life example.

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