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In the Haskell Wikibook, foldr is implemented as follows:

foldr :: (a -> b -> b) -> b -> [a] -> b
foldr f acc []     = acc
foldr f acc (x:xs) = f x (foldr f acc xs)

It is stated that the initial value of the accumulator is set as an argument. But as I understand it, acc is the identity value for the operation (e.g. 0 for sum or 1 for product) and its value does not change during the execution of the function. Why then is it referred to here and in other texts as an accumulator, implying that it changes or accumulates a value step by step?

I can see that an accumulator is relevant in a left fold, such as foldl, but is the wikibook explanation incorrect, and only for symmetry, in which case it is wrong?

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  • Accumulation in foldl happens from the left and accumulation in foldr happens from the right. Commented Nov 22, 2014 at 4:44
  • 4
    Yeah that is interesting. It'd probably be more appropriate to call the second argument of f the accumulator. I usually write foldr-esque patterns with either z (connoting zero) or nil (connoting the constructor case it corresponds to).
    – luqui
    Commented Nov 22, 2014 at 4:46

2 Answers 2

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Consider the evaluation of a simple foldr expression based on the (correct) definition you provided:

  foldr (+) 0 [1,2,3,4]
= 1 + foldr (+) 0 [2,3,4]
= 1 + 2 + foldr (+) 0 [3,4]
= 1 + 2 + 3 + foldr (+) 0 [4]
= 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + foldr (+) 0 []
= 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 0
= 10

So you are right: acc doesn't really "accumulate" anything. It never takes on a value other than 0.

Why is it called "acc" if it isn't an accumulator? Similarity to foldl? Hysterical raisins? A lie to children? I'm not sure.

Edit: I'll also point out that the GHC implementation of foldr uses z (presumably for zero) rather than acc.

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  • Well, its an accumulator that doesn't change :P Commented Nov 22, 2014 at 13:43
  • @alternative not funny
    – Tony
    Commented Jun 24, 2022 at 4:46
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acc doesn't really accumulate anything in the case of foldr as has been pointed out.

I'd add that without it, it's not clear what should happen when the input is an empty list.

It also changes the type signature of f, limiting the functions that can be used.

E.g:

foldr' :: (a -> a -> a) -> [a] -> a
foldr' f [] = error "empty list???"
foldr' f (x:[]) = x
foldr' f (x:xs) = f x (foldr' f xs)
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  • what you describe is foldr1 and it indeed errors on empty lists.
    – Will Ness
    Commented Nov 23, 2014 at 15:56

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