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why does time() not need to be qualified to the global namespace when InvalidArgumentException does?

I suspect that the argument was: that having to qualify every single std lib function would be over burdensome, however the same argument can be applied to classes as well. Is there any technical reason why classes have to be qualified?

As an example

<?php namespace aname;
class Baz {
    function setBar($foo) {
        if ($foo < 0) {
            throw new \InvalidArgumentException("Some message");
        }
    }
    function setFoo($foo) {
        if ($foo < 0) {
            throw new InvalidArgumentException("Some message");
        }
    }
}
echo "here is the current timestamp: " . time() . PHP_EOL;
$baz = new Baz();
try {
    $baz->setBar(-1);   
} catch (\InvalidArgumentException $e) {
    echo $e->getMessage() . PHP_EOL;
}
$baz->setFoo(-1);

The output.

here is the current timestamp: 1416722687
Some message
PHP Fatal error:  Class 'aname\InvalidArgumentException' not found in /<long/path>/nstest.php on line 10

Also why don't I get a parse error when I run this code? I was under the impression that namespaces resolution happened at what PHP calls compile time.

All unqualified and qualified names (not fully qualified names) are translated during compilation according to current import rules. For example, if the namespace A\B\C is imported as C, a call to C\D\e() is translated to A\B\C\D\e().

  • Functions are looked up in the global and in the namespaced scope. Classes only in the current one, unless qualified. And the parser simply prepends the current namespace to classes at parse time; it doesn't try to resolve them to code yet. – mario Nov 23 '14 at 6:20
  • Love the XML quote @mario. I did suspect that this had something to do with class names verses function names. I suspect that the argument was: that having the qualify every single std lib function name would be over burdensome, however the same argument can be applied to classes as well. Is there any technical reason why classes have to be qualified? – robbmj Nov 23 '14 at 6:28
  • I'm not sure of a concrete technical reason. Other than that namespace supported was just bolted-on as one big hack. It's commonly used to shadow similar class names, so this stipulation prevents some incidental identifier clashes / look-up ambiguity (→ optimizing for edge cases). – mario Nov 23 '14 at 6:38

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