50

I have a WPF GUI, where I want to press a button to start a long task without freezing the window for the duration of the task. While the task is running I would like to get reports on progress, and I would like to incorporate another button that will stop the task at any time I choose.

I cannot figure the correct way to use async/await/task. I can't include everything I've tried, but this is what I have at the moment.

A WPF window class :

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    readonly otherClass _burnBabyBurn = new OtherClass();
    internal bool StopWorking = false;

    //A button method to start the long running method
    private async void Button_Click_3(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {   
        Task burnTheBaby = _burnBabyBurn.ExecuteLongProcedureAsync(this, intParam1, intParam2, intParam3);

        await burnTheBaby;
    }

    //A button Method to interrupt and stop the long running method
    private void StopButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        StopWorking = true;
    }

    //A method to allow the worker method to call back and update the gui
    internal void UpdateWindow(string message)
    {
        TextBox1.Text = message;
    }
}

And a class for the worker method:

class OtherClass
{
    internal Task ExecuteLongProcedureAsync(MainWindow gui, int param1, int param2, int param3)
    {       
        var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<int>();       

        //Start doing work
        gui.UpdateWindow("Work Started");        

        While(stillWorking)
        {
        //Mid procedure progress report
        gui.UpdateWindow("Bath water n% thrown out");        
        if (gui.StopTraining) return tcs.Task;
        }

        //Exit message
        gui.UpdateWindow("Done and Done");       
        return tcs.Task;        
    }
}

This runs, but the WPF function window is still blocked once the worker method starts.

I need to know how to arrange the async/await/task declarations to allow

A) the worker method to not block the gui window
B) let the worker method update the gui window
C) allow the gui window to stop interrupt and stop the worker method

Any help or pointers are much appreciated.

116

Long story short:

private async void ButtonClick(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    // modify UI object in UI thread
    txt.Text = "started";

    // run a method in another thread
    await Task.Run(()=> HeavyMethod(txt));
    // <<method execution is finished here>>

    // modify UI object in UI thread
    txt.Text = "done";
}

// This is a thread-safe method. You can run it in any thread
internal void HeavyMethod(TextBox textBox)
{
    while (stillWorking)
    {
        textBox.Dispatcher.Invoke(() =>
        {
            // UI operation goes inside of Invoke
            textBox.Text += ".";
        });

        // CPU-bound or I/O-bound operation goes outside of Invoke
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(51);
    }
}
Result:
started....................done

You need to know about (1) how to write async code and (2) how to run UI operations in another thread.

The magic of async and await:

  1. You can only await in an async method.

  2. You can only await an awaitable object (i.e. Task, Task<T> or ValueTask<T> etc)

  3. The return type of an async method will (probably) be wrapped in a Task and await unwraps it. (see Wrapping and Unwrapping section)

  4. Task.Run usually queues a Task in the thread pool

    (i.e. it uses an existing thread or creates a new thread in the thread pool to run the task. This is all true if the async operation is not a pure operation, otherwise there will be no thread, just pure async operation handled by OS and device drivers)

  5. The execution waits at await for the task to finish and returns back its results, without blocking the main thread because of the magic:

  6. The magic of async-await is that it uses a state-machine to let the compiler give up and take back the control over the awaited Task in an async method.

    (i.e. async method does not run in another thread. async and await by themselves don't have anything to do with thread creation.)

Don't confuse the method with async keyword with the method wrapped within a Task; The Task is responsible for threading, the async is responsible for the magic

So

By putting async in the method signature you tell the compiler to use state machine to call this method (no threading so far). Then by running a Task you use a thread to call the method inside the task. And by awaiting the task you prevent the execution flow to move past the await line without blocking UI thread.

private async void MyButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    //queue a task to run on threadpool
    Task task = Task.Run(()=>
        ExecuteLongProcedure(this, intParam1, intParam2, intParam3));
    //wait for it to end without blocking the main thread
    await task;
}

or simply

private async void MyButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    await Task.Run(()=>
        ExecuteLongProcedure(this, intParam1, intParam2, intParam3));
}

or if ExecuteLongProcedure has a return value of type string

private async void MyButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    Task<string> task = Task.Run(()=>
        ExecuteLongProcedure(this, intParam1, intParam2, intParam3));
    string returnValue = await task;
}

or simply

private async void MyButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    string returnValue = await Task.Run(()=>
        ExecuteLongProcedure(this, intParam1, intParam2, intParam3));

    //or in cases where you already have a "Task returning" method:
    //  var httpResponseInfo = await httpRequestInfo.GetResponseAsync();
}

The method inside the task (or ExecuteLongProcedure) runs asynchronously and looks like this:

//change the value for the following flag to terminate the loop
bool stillWorking = true;

//calling this method blocks the calling thread
//you must run a task for it
internal void ExecuteLongProcedure(MainWindow gui, int param1, int param2, int param3)
{
    // Start doing work
    gui.UpdateWindow("Work Started");

    while (stillWorking)
    {
        // put a dot in the window showing the progress
        gui.UpdateWindow(".");
        // the following line will block main thread unless
        //  ExecuteLongProcedure is called in an async method
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(51);
    }

    gui.UpdateWindow("Done and Done");
} 

You might want to scroll down to WPF GUI section if you don't want to learn more!

Asynchronousy is viral

Normally, when you write an async method, you'll make all the callers async all the way up. If even one caller is not an async operation (sync over async), you'd be better off without asynchronousy.

In WPF GUI you start from your async event handler all the way down to the point where the CPU-bound or IO-bound operations are being executed (task) and to the point where the WPF GUI objects are being manipulated (invoke).

Return Types:

suppose you have private async ReturnType Method() { ... }

  • If ReturnType is void

    • you can only fire and forget i.e. just call the method normally: Method(); and then go on with your life.
    • This is how WPF handles your button click event handler, obviously because your handler returns void.
    • If you try writing await Method();, you will get a compile error saying cannot await void.
  • If ReturnType is Task then await Method(); doesn't return anything.

  • If ReturnType is Task<T> then the value returned by await Method(); is a value of type T.

The return type of an async method must be void, Task, Task<T>, a task-like type, IAsyncEnumerable<T>, or IAsyncEnumerator<T>

Wrapping and Unrwapping:

When you return a value from an async method it will be wrapped in a Task<T>. E.g., if you expect an int from your async method then it should return a Task<int>:

private async Task<int> GetOneAsync()
{
    return 1; // return type is a simple int 
              // while the method signature indicates a Task<int>
}

How do we retrieve or unwrap the value which is wrapped inside a Task<>?

e.g.

int number = await Task.Run(() => 1); // right hand of await is a Task<int>
                                      // while the left hand is an int

expand it like this:

Func<int> GetOneFunc = () => 1; // synchronous function returning a number
Task<int> GetOneTask = Task.Run(GetOneFunc); // a Task<int> is started
int number = await GetOneTask; // waiting AND unwrapping Task<int> into int

The whole code:

private async Task<int> GetNumberAsync()
{
    int number = await Task.Run(GetNumber); // unwrap int from Task<int>

    // bad practices:
    // int number = Task.Run(GetNumber).GetAwaiter().GetResult(); // sync over async
    // int number = Task.Run(GetNumber).Result; // sync over async
    // int number = Task.Run(GetNumber).Wait(); // sync over async

    return number; // wrap int in Task<int>
}

Still confused? Read async return types on MSDN.

To unwrap a task result, Always try to use await instead of .Result otherwise there will be no asynchronous benefit but only asynchronous disadvantages.

Note:

await is a asynchronous and is different from task.Wait() which is synchronous. But they both do the same thing which is waiting for the task to finish.

await is a asynchronous and is different from task.Result which is synchronous. But they both do the same thing which is waiting for the task to finish and unwrapping and returning back the results.

To have a wrapped value, you can always use Task.FromResult(1) instead of creating a new thread by using Task.Run(() => 1).

Task.Run is newer (.NetFX4.5) and simpler version of Task.Factory.StartNew

Naming Convention

Simply postfix the name of the method with the async keyword with Async.

Since avoiding async void methods is a good practice (see patterns below), you can say only Task returning methods should be postfixed with Async.

The purpose of this convention is to make sure the Asynchronous Virality is respected.


WPF GUI:

This is where I explain how to run UI operations in another thread.


Blocking:

First thing you need to know about WPF async event handlers is that the Dispatcher will provide a synchronization context. Explained here

CPU-bound or IO-bound operations such as Sleep and task.Wait() will block and consume the thread even if they are called in a method with async keyword. but await Task.Delay() tells the state-machine to stop the flow of execution on the thread so it does not consume it; meaning that the thread resources can be used elsewhere:

private async void Button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
        Thread.Sleep(1000);//stops, blocks and consumes threadpool resources
        await Task.Delay(1000);//stops without consuming threadpool resources
        Task.Run(() => Thread.Sleep(1000));//does not stop but consumes threadpool resources
        await Task.Run(() => Thread.Sleep(1000));//literally the WORST thing to do
}

Thread Safety:

If you have to access GUI asynchronously (inside ExecuteLongProcedure method), invoke any operation which involves modification to any non-thread-safe object. For instance, any WPF GUI object must be invoked using a Dispatcher object which is associated with the GUI thread:

void UpdateWindow(string text)
{
    //safe call
    Dispatcher.Invoke(() =>
    {
        txt.Text += text;
    });
}

However, If a task is started as a result of a property changed callback from the ViewModel, there is no need to use Dispatcher.Invoke because the callback is actually executed from the UI thread.

Accessing collections on non-UI Threads

WPF enables you to access and modify data collections on threads other than the one that created the collection. This enables you to use a background thread to receive data from an external source, such as a database, and display the data on the UI thread. By using another thread to modify the collection, your user interface remains responsive to user interaction.

Value changes fired by INotifyPropertyChanged are automatically marshalled back onto the dispatcher.

How to enable cross-thread access

Remember, async method itself runs on the main thread. So this is valid:

private async void MyButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    txt.Text = "starting"; // UI Thread
    await Task.Run(()=> ExecuteLongProcedure1());
    txt.Text = "waiting"; // UI Thread
    await Task.Run(()=> ExecuteLongProcedure2());
    txt.Text = "finished"; // UI Thread
}

Patterns:

Fire and forget pattern:

For obvious reasons this is how your WPF GUI event handlers such as Button_Click are called.

void Do()
{
    // CPU-Bound or IO-Bound operations
}
async void DoAsync() // returns void
{
    await Task.Run(Do);
}
void FireAndForget() // not blocks, not waits
{
    DoAsync();
}

Fire and observe:

Task-returning methods are better since unhandled exceptions trigger the TaskScheduler.UnobservedTaskException.

void Do()
{
    // CPU-Bound or IO-Bound operations
}
async Task DoAsync() // returns Task
{
    await Task.Run(Do);
}
void FireAndWait() // not blocks, not waits
{
    Task.Run(DoAsync);
}

Fire and wait synchronously while wasting thread resources:

This is known as Sync over async, it is a synchronous operation but it uses more than one thread which may cause starvation. This happens when you call Wait() or try to read results directly from task.Result before the task is finished.

(AVOID THIS PATTERN)

void Do()
{
    // CPU-Bound or IO-Bound operations
}
async Task DoAsync() // returns Task
{
    await Task.Run(Do);
}
void FireAndWait() // blocks, waits and uses 2 more threads. Yikes!
{
    var task = Task.Run(DoAsync);
    task.Wait();
}

Is this all to it?

No. There is a lot more to learn about async, its context and its continuation. This blogpost is especially recommended.

Task uses Thread? Are you sure?

Not necessarily. Read this answer to know more about the true face of async.

Stephen Cleary has explained async-await perfectly. He also explains in his other blog post when there is no thread involved.

Read more

ValueTask and Task

MSDN explains Task

MSDN explains async

how-to-call-asynchronous-method-from-synchronous-method

async await - Behind the scenes

async await - FAQ

Make sure you know the difference between Asynchronous, Parallel and Concurrent.

You may also read a simple asynchronous file writer to know where you should concurrent.

Investigate concurrent namespace

Ultimately, read this e-book: Patterns_of_Parallel_Programming_CSharp

|improve this answer|||||
  • Wonderful, thanks you so so much, this was driving me around the twist. Ill figure the halt/stop easily enough now too :) – Kickaha Nov 23 '14 at 14:01
  • You're welcome. for the record it's sometimes better to sleep the async thread by adding System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(10); to the end of UpdateWindow method. – Bizhan Nov 23 '14 at 14:15
  • 4
    Great answer. I would add one more option though. If you bind your UI to an object that implements INotifyPropertyChanged (usually called ViewModel), then you can change properties of the object from asynchronous thread. WPF's databinding mechanizm will switch to UI thread for you. – Liero Nov 30 '16 at 9:33
  • Thank you @Liero for the useful information. I put that in answer – Bizhan Nov 30 '16 at 9:56
  • Wow! That's what I call a complete answer. Thaks! – Vi100 Oct 15 '19 at 8:06
11

Your use of TaskCompletionSource<T> is incorrect. TaskCompletionSource<T> is a way to create TAP-compatible wrappers for asynchronous operations. In your ExecuteLongProcedureAsync method, the sample code is all CPU-bound (i.e., inherently synchronous, not asynchronous).

So, it's much more natural to write ExecuteLongProcedure as a synchronous method. It's also a good idea to use standard types for standard behaviors, in particular using IProgress<T> for progress updates and CancellationToken for cancellation:

internal void ExecuteLongProcedure(int param1, int param2, int param3,
    CancellationToken cancellationToken, IProgress<string> progress)
{       
  //Start doing work
  if (progress != null)
    progress.Report("Work Started");

  while (true)
  {
    //Mid procedure progress report
    if (progress != null)
      progress.Report("Bath water n% thrown out");
    cancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
  }

  //Exit message
  if (progress != null)
    progress.Report("Done and Done");
}

Now you have a more reusable type (no GUI dependencies) that uses the appropriate conventions. It can be used as such:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
  readonly otherClass _burnBabyBurn = new OtherClass();
  CancellationTokenSource _stopWorkingCts = new CancellationTokenSource();

  //A button method to start the long running method
  private async void Button_Click_3(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
  {
    var progress = new Progress<string>(data => UpdateWindow(data));
    try
    {
      await Task.Run(() => _burnBabyBurn.ExecuteLongProcedure(intParam1, intParam2, intParam3,
          _stopWorkingCts.Token, progress));
    }
    catch (OperationCanceledException)
    {
      // TODO: update the GUI to indicate the method was canceled.
    }
  }

  //A button Method to interrupt and stop the long running method
  private void StopButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
  {
    _stopWorkingCts.Cancel();
  }

  //A method to allow the worker method to call back and update the gui
  void UpdateWindow(string message)
  {
    TextBox1.Text = message;
  }
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • Cheers, as you say this helps keep my type portable to different interface layers. Also the cancellation token actually cancel the thread and (ill assume) releases the threads resources... and my bool token based interruption actually pauses thread execution so that's good too. Thanks :) – Kickaha Nov 24 '14 at 12:40
  • @Kickaha: The bool approach is technically wrong; it makes incorrect assumptions about the .NET memory model. – Stephen Cleary Nov 24 '14 at 12:48
  • 1
    Ahh.. yes fair enough. To implement pause Ill be sure to seralize and save, then resume state from the save instead of assuming persistence when there patently should not be any. Thank you. – Kickaha Nov 24 '14 at 13:26
4

Here is an example using async/await, IProgress<T> and CancellationTokenSource. These are the modern C# and .Net Framework language features that you should be using. The other solutions are making my eyes bleed a bit.

Code Features

  • Count to 100 over a period of 10 seconds
  • Display progress on a progress bar
  • Long running work (a 'wait' period) performed without blocking the UI
  • User triggered cancellation
  • Incremental progress updates
  • Post operation status report

The view

<Window x:Class="ProgressExample.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
        xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006"
        mc:Ignorable="d"
        Title="MainWindow" SizeToContent="WidthAndHeight" Height="93.258" Width="316.945">
    <StackPanel>
        <Button x:Name="Button_Start" Click="Button_Click">Start</Button>
        <ProgressBar x:Name="ProgressBar_Progress" Height="20"  Maximum="100"/>
        <Button x:Name="Button_Cancel" IsEnabled="False" Click="Button_Cancel_Click">Cancel</Button>
    </StackPanel>
</Window>

The code

    /// <summary>
    /// Interaction logic for MainWindow.xaml
    /// </summary>
    public partial class MainWindow : Window
    {
        private CancellationTokenSource currentCancellationSource;

        public MainWindow()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private async void Button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            // Enable/disabled buttons so that only one counting task runs at a time.
            this.Button_Start.IsEnabled = false;
            this.Button_Cancel.IsEnabled = true;

            try
            {
                // Set up the progress event handler - this instance automatically invokes to the UI for UI updates
                // this.ProgressBar_Progress is the progress bar control
                IProgress<int> progress = new Progress<int>(count => this.ProgressBar_Progress.Value = count);

                currentCancellationSource = new CancellationTokenSource();
                await CountToOneHundredAsync(progress, this.currentCancellationSource.Token);

                // Operation was successful. Let the user know!
                MessageBox.Show("Done counting!");
            }
            catch (OperationCanceledException)
            {
                // Operation was cancelled. Let the user know!
                MessageBox.Show("Operation cancelled.");
            }
            finally
            {
                // Reset controls in a finally block so that they ALWAYS go 
                // back to the correct state once the counting ends, 
                // regardless of any exceptions
                this.Button_Start.IsEnabled = true;
                this.Button_Cancel.IsEnabled = false;
                this.ProgressBar_Progress.Value = 0;

                // Dispose of the cancellation source as it is no longer needed
                this.currentCancellationSource.Dispose();
                this.currentCancellationSource = null;
            }
        }

        private async Task CountToOneHundredAsync(IProgress<int> progress, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
        {
            for (int i = 1; i <= 100; i++)
            {
                // This is where the 'work' is performed. 
                // Feel free to swap out Task.Delay for your own Task-returning code! 
                // You can even await many tasks here

                // ConfigureAwait(false) tells the task that we dont need to come back to the UI after awaiting
                // This is a good read on the subject - https://blog.stephencleary.com/2012/07/dont-block-on-async-code.html
                await Task.Delay(100, cancellationToken).ConfigureAwait(false);

                // If cancelled, an exception will be thrown by the call the task.Delay
                // and will bubble up to the calling method because we used await!

                // Report progress with the current number
                progress.Report(i);
            }
        }

        private void Button_Cancel_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            // Cancel the cancellation token
            this.currentCancellationSource.Cancel();
        }
    }
|improve this answer|||||
4

This is a simplified version of the most popular answer here by Bijan. I simplified Bijan's answer to help me think through the problem using the nice formatting provided by Stack Overflow.

By carefully reading and editing Bijan's post I finally understood: How to wait for async method to complete?

In my case the chosen answer for that other post is what ultimately led me to solve my problem:

"Avoid async void. Have your methods return Task instead of void. Then you can await them."

My simplified version of Bijan's (excellent) answer follows:

1) This starts a task using async and await:

private async void Button_Click_3(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    // if ExecuteLongProcedureAsync has a return value
    var returnValue = await Task.Run(()=>
        ExecuteLongProcedureAsync(this, intParam1, intParam2, intParam3));
}

2) This is the method to execute asynchronously:

bool stillWorking = true;
internal void ExecuteLongProcedureAsync(MainWindow gui, int param1, int param2, int param3)
{
    //Start doing work
    gui.UpdateWindow("Work Started");

    while (stillWorking)
    {
        //put a dot in the window showing the progress
        gui.UpdateWindow(".");

        //the following line blocks main thread unless
        //ExecuteLongProcedureAsync is called with await keyword
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(50);
    }

    gui.UpdateWindow("Done and Done");
} 

3) Invoke the operation which involves a property from gui:

void UpdateWindow(string text)
{
    //safe call
    Dispatcher.Invoke(() =>
    {
        txt.Text += text;
    });
}

Or,

void UpdateWindow(string text)
{
    //simply
    txt.Text += text;
}

Closing comments) In most cases you have two methods.

  • First method (Button_Click_3) calls the second method and has the async modifier which tells the compiler to enable threading for that method.

    • Thread.Sleep in an async method blocks the main thread. but awaiting a task does not.
    • Execution stops on current thread (second thread) on await statements until task is finished.
    • You can't use await outside an async method
  • Second method (ExecuteLongProcedureAsync) is wrapped within a task and returns a generic Task<original return type> object which can be instructed to be processed asynchronously by adding await before it.

    • Everything in this method in executed asynchronously

Important:

Liero brought up an important issue. When you are Binding an element to a ViewModel property, the property changed callback is executed in UI thread. So there is no need to use Dispatcher.Invoke. Value changes fired by INotifyPropertyChanged are automatically marshalled back onto the dispatcher.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Just undeleted this post because I saw someone had upvoted it so it seems someone saw value in it. I don't know what to do with it and I apologize if it's against the rules. I copied-and-pasted an existing answer and removed text to allow me to think through the problem. – Eric D Sep 11 '17 at 20:39
  • Eric, remixing other people's answers is very much encouraged, as long as you credit them. The liberal license (see "cc by-sa 3.0" in the site footer) explicitly allows for it. – halfer Sep 30 '17 at 10:20

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