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i want my script to search in a specific file (text.txt) for "JOL:" ; "CRY:" ; "LAY:", if it doesn't find "JOL:" i want it to search for "CRY:" and if it doesn't find "CRY:" to look for "LAY:". The problem is that i don't know if it's possible to include an "Elif" with a "match" command, and if it's the case... How ?

import re, os

mykey = open("text.txt", "r")
take = open("take.txt", "w")
match = re.search ('"JOL":"(.+?).tr', text)
match2 = re.search('"CRY":"(.+?).tr', text)
match3 = re.search ('"LAY":"(.+?).tr', text)

for text in mykey:
    if match:
        print >> take, match.group(1)
    elif match:
        print >> take, match2.group(1)
    elif match:
        print >> take, match3.group(1)

Thanks

  • why do you have >> in your print statement? – pad Nov 23 '14 at 16:49
  • 1
    You have 3 different regexp that go to 3 different match variables. Should you be testing something like if I don't find a match with the first pattern, I try with the other match, and if I still don't find anything, I'd try with the third match? – BorrajaX Nov 23 '14 at 16:50
  • 1
    @pad: That's how you print to a file in Python 2.x: stackoverflow.com/a/9316160/47453 – Bill Lynch Nov 23 '14 at 16:51
  • @BorrajaX Yes, i'm trying to do that. But how ? – Prixeler Nov 23 '14 at 16:52
  • @BillLynch neat, thanks! – pad Nov 23 '14 at 16:53
1

It looks to me like the problem is that you're always testing if the text matches match:

So, let's simplify a bit. What happens with the following code?:

match = None
if match:
    # The interpreter will never get here because `match` is None, which
    # evaluates to False when in an `if`
    print >> take, match.group(1)
elif match:
    # This `elif` is still testing against `match`, which is still None,
    # therefore, evaluated to false. 
    print >> take, match2.group(1)
elif match:
    # Same drill here...
    print >> take, match3.group(1)

I'm guessing you want to do:

if match:
    print >> take, match.group(1)
elif match2:
    print >> take, match2.group(1)
elif match3:
    print >> take, match3.group(1)

EDIT:

Maybe the following code will help you understand what's happening. The code below transforms yours by doing two things:

  1. Read the input file line by line
  2. Match each line to each of the three expressions

With those changes, the code would look like:

import re, os

mykey = open("text.txt", "r")
take = open("take.txt", "w")

print "I have opened a file object to read stuff. That is: %s" % mykey
print "I have opened a file object to write stuff. That is: %s" % take

for text in mykey:
    print "I have read the line: %s" % text
    match = re.search('"JOL":"(.+?).tr', text)
    match2 = re.search('"CRY":"(.+?).tr', text)
    match3 = re.search('"LAY":"(.+?).tr', text)
    if match:
        print >> take, match.group(1)
    elif match2:
        print >> take, match2.group(1)
    elif match3:
        print >> take, match3.group(1)

If text.txt contains the following:

"JOL":"foo1".tr
"CRY":"bar1".tr
"LAY":"baz1".tr
"LAY":"baz2".tr
"CRY":"bar2".tr
"JOL":"foo2".tr

The contents found in take.txt after you run this script will be:

foo1"
bar1"
baz1"
baz2"
bar2"
foo2"

I have added some print statements that maybe will help you understand a bit what's going on. Check your terminal and see if that "extra debug" output helps you follow what's happening in the code.

You should also try to understand how file objects (input-output, in general) works in Python.

  • I've this error NameError : name "text" is not defined – Prixeler Nov 23 '14 at 17:17
  • That's a different issue... You're using text in match = re.search ('"JOL:"(.+?).tr', text) before initializing the text variable anywhere before that line. Maybe it should be mykey? (dunno) Also, you're gonna have another problem in the for text in take loop. Your take variable is pointing to a file that is opened for write only (see the open("take.txt", "w") line). When you reach that line, you'll get an IOError: File not open for reading – BorrajaX Nov 23 '14 at 17:24
  • I just copying the wrong code. The one i use now is in "my question" and i still get the same error. – Prixeler Nov 23 '14 at 17:26
  • yeah, 'cuz you're doing the same thing :-) Your interpreter doesn't know what text is when it reaches match = re.search ('"JOL:"(.+?).tr', text) What is text supposed to be? The contents of text.txt? Because you don't have those anywhere in your code. The closest thing you have is mykey, but that's not the content of the text.txt file. Is the text.txt file object (see docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html#bltin-file-objects ) – BorrajaX Nov 23 '14 at 17:30
  • I didn't understand. How can i define "text" command then ? mykey is supposed to open and read "text.txt" so why it can't define the "content" of text.txt ? And above all, why does it work when there is only for text in mykey: if match: print >> take, match.group(1) without "elif" – Prixeler Nov 23 '14 at 20:09

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