5

I did this Just for kicks (so, not exactly a question, i can see the downmodding happening already) but, in lieu of Google's newfound inability to do math correctly (check it! according to google 500,000,000,000,002 - 500,000,000,000,001 = 0), i figured i'd try the following in C to run a little theory.

int main()
{
   char* a = "399999999999999";
   char* b = "399999999999998";

   float da = atof(a);
   float db = atof(b);

   printf("%s - %s = %f\n", a, b, da-db);

   a = "500000000000002";
   b = "500000000000001";
   da = atof(a);
   db = atof(b);
   printf("%s - %s = %f\n", a, b, da-db);
}

When you run this program, you get the following

   399999999999999 - 399999999999998 = 0.000000
   500000000000002 - 500000000000001 = 0.000000

It would seem like Google is using simple 32 bit floating precision (the error here), if you switch float for double in the above code, you fix the issue! Could this be it?

/mp

2

in C#, try (double.maxvalue == (double.maxvalue - 100)) , you'll get true ...

but thats what it is supposed to be:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floating_point#Accuracy_problems

thinking about it, you have 64 bit representing a number greater than 2^64 (double.maxvalue), so inaccuracy is expected.

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4

For more of this kind of silliness see this nice article pertaining to Windows calculator.

When you change the insides, nobody notices

The innards of Calc - the arithmetic engine - was completely thrown away and rewritten from scratch. The standard IEEE floating point library was replaced with an arbitrary-precision arithmetic library. This was done after people kept writing ha-ha articles about how Calc couldn't do decimal arithmetic correctly, that for example computing 10.21 - 10.2 resulted in 0.0100000000000016.

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2

It would seem like Google is using simple 32 bit floating precision (the error here), if you switch float for double in the above code, you fix the issue! Could this be it?

No, you just defer the issue. doubles still exhibit the same issue, just with larger numbers.

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1

@ebel

thinking about it, you have 64 bit representing a number greater than 2^64 (double.maxvalue), so inaccuracy is expected.

2^64 is not the maximum value of a double. 2^64 is the number of unique values that a double (or any other 64-bit type) can hold. Double.MaxValue is equal to 1.79769313486232e308.

Inaccuracy with floating point numbers doesn't come from representing values larger than Double.MaxValue (which is impossible, excluding Double.PositiveInfinity). It comes from the fact that the desired range of values is simply too large to fit into the datatype. So we give up precision in exchange for a larger effective range. In essense, we are dropping significant digits in return for a larger exponent range.

@DrPizza

Not even; the IEEE encodings use multiple encodings for the same values. Specifically, NaN is represented by an exponent of all-bits-1, and then any non-zero value for the mantissa. As such, there are 252 NaNs for doubles, 223 NaNs for singles.

True. I didn't account for duplicate encodings. There are actually 252-1 NaNs for doubles and 223-1 NaNs for singles, though. :p

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0

2^64 is not the maximum value of a double. 2^64 is the number of unique values that a double (or any other 64-bit type) can hold. Double.MaxValue is equal to 1.79769313486232e308.

Not even; the IEEE encodings use multiple encodings for the same values. Specifically, NaN is represented by an exponent of all-bits-1, and then any non-zero value for the mantissa. As such, there are 252 NaNs for doubles, 223 NaNs for singles.

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0

True. I didn't account for duplicate encodings. There are actually 252-1 NaNs for doubles and 223-1 NaNs for singles, though. :p

Doh, forgot to subtract the infinities.

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0

The rough estimate version of this issue that I learned is that 32-bit floats give you 5 digits of precision and 64-bit floats give you 15 digits of precision. This will of course vary depending on how the floats are encoded, but it's a pretty good starting point.

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