6

I am trying to wrap my head around how to use GCD to parallelize and speed up Monte Carlo simulations. Most/all simple examples are presented for Objective C and I really need a simple example for Swift since Swift is my first “real” programming language.

The minimal working version of a monte carlo simulation in Swift would be something like this:

import Foundation

import Cocoa
var winner = 0
var j = 0
var i = 0
var chance = 0
var points = 0
for j=1;j<1000001;++j{
    var ability = 500

    var player1points = 0

    for i=1;i<1000;++i{
        chance = Int(arc4random_uniform(1001))
        if chance<(ability-points) {++points}
        else{points = points - 1}
    }
    if points > 0{++winner}
}
    println(winner)

The code works directly pasted into a command line program project in xcode 6.1

The innermost loop cannot be parallelized because the new value of variable “points” is used in the next loop. But the outermost just run the innermost simulation 1000000 times and tally up the results and should be an ideal candidate for parallelization.

So my question is how to use GCD to parallelize the outermost for loop?

5

A "multi-threaded iteration" can be done with dispatch_apply():

let outerCount = 100    // # of concurrent block iterations
let innerCount = 10000  // # of iterations within each block

let the_queue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0);
dispatch_apply(UInt(outerCount), the_queue) { outerIdx -> Void in
    for innerIdx in 1 ... innerCount {
       // ...
    }
}

(You have to figure out the best relation between outer and inner counts.)

There are two things to notice:

Then it would roughly look like this:

let outerCount = 100     // # of concurrent block iterations
let innerCount = 10000   // # of iterations within each block

let the_queue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0);

var winners = [Int](count: outerCount, repeatedValue: 0)
winners.withUnsafeMutableBufferPointer { winnersPtr -> Void in

    dispatch_apply(UInt(outerCount), the_queue) { outerIdx -> Void in
        var seed = arc4random() // seed for rand_r() in this "thread"

        for innerIdx in 1 ... innerCount {
            var points = 0
            var ability = 500

            for i in 1 ... 1000 {
                let chance = Int(rand_r(&seed) % 1001)
                if chance < (ability-points) { ++points }
                else {points = points - 1}
            }
            if points > 0 {
                winnersPtr[Int(outerIdx)] += 1
            }
        }
    }
}

// Add results:
let winner = reduce(winners, 0, +)
println(winner)
  • Didn't know that about arc4random()! Be careful of modifying arrays from multiple threads - see this Q&A for more: stackoverflow.com/questions/26693838/… – Nate Cook Nov 24 '14 at 15:09
  • I think my second answer (not the accepted one) to that Q is the Swiftiest, since it explicitly gets a contiguous memory buffer for the array. – Nate Cook Nov 24 '14 at 15:10
  • 1
    @NateCook: I already had the feeling that I had seen something like that, but could not find it. Thanks for the reference and your solution (+1), I have updated the answer accordingly. – Martin R Nov 24 '14 at 15:20
  • Thanks. Especially for using my very simple example. This way I might have a chance of understanding what is going on. Can´t wait to try it later today. One question though: You are splitting the 1000000 “loops” into chunks before queueing them. Is that to avoid too much overhead? In the code I am actually using the innermost loop has a lot more manipulation of many variables. Would that effect how to divide the original 1000000 loops or is the more important factor how many “chunks” you feed to the queue? – user2523167 Nov 24 '14 at 15:50
  • 1
    @RichardBirkett: Yes, I wondered about that as well. Have a look at the comments following this answer stackoverflow.com/a/39949292/1187415. – Martin R Dec 18 '16 at 19:46

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