15

I already knew that setting a field is much slower than setting a local variable, but it also appears that setting a field with a local variable is much slower than setting a local variable with a field. Why is this? In either case the address of the field is used.

public class Test
{
    public int A = 0;
    public int B = 4;

    public void Method1() // Set local with field
    {
        int a = A;

        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
        {
            a += B;
        }

        A = a;
    }

    public void Method2() // Set field with local
    {
        int b = B;

        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
        {
            A += b;
        }
    }
}

The benchmark results with 10e+6 iterations are:

Method1: 28.1321 ms
Method2: 162.4528 ms
11
  • 2
    It depends on a lot of things, but the most obvious explanation is that getting doesn't have to access DRAM (the value's in the CPU cache), while setting does (cache write-through...i.e. the value is written to both the cache and system memory). Note that setting a local variable may result in no memory access at all, since the compiler may have optimized the local variable into a register. Nov 24, 2014 at 18:25
  • @PeterDuniho - I thought only locals were eligible for CPU caching?
    – toplel32
    Nov 24, 2014 at 18:28
  • As I mention in my comment, locals often aren't even stored in system RAM. But all memory access, regardless of the type of variable, is eligible for caching. The cache doesn't care (or even know) why you are using a specific memory address; it caches any and all data it is able to when system memory is involved. Nov 24, 2014 at 18:29
  • 1
    FWIW on my machine, the times are nearly identical. (within 1%)
    – recursive
    Nov 24, 2014 at 18:30
  • 1
    I suspect what we're seeing here is a difference in operating on a variable held in memory vs one in a register. I'd expect method 1 to keep a in a register while method 2 isn't. Nov 24, 2014 at 18:39

3 Answers 3

15

Running this on my machine, I get similar time differences, however looking at the JITted code for 10M iterations, it's clear to see why this is the case:

Method A:

mov     r8,rcx
; "A" is loaded into eax
mov     eax,dword ptr [r8+8]
xor     edx,edx
; "B" is loaded into ecx
mov     ecx,dword ptr [r8+0Ch]
nop     dword ptr [rax]
loop_start:
; Partially unrolled loop, all additions done in registers
add     eax,ecx
add     eax,ecx
add     eax,ecx
add     eax,ecx
add     edx,4
cmp     edx,989680h
jl      loop_start
; Store the sum in eax back to "A"
mov     dword ptr [r8+8],eax
ret

And Method B:

; "B" is loaded into edx
mov     edx,dword ptr [rcx+0Ch]
xor     r8d,r8d
nop word ptr [rax+rax]
loop_start:
; Partially unrolled loop, but each iteration requires reading "A" from memory
; adding "B" to it, and then writing the new "A" back to memory.
mov     eax,dword ptr [rcx+8]
add     eax,edx
mov     dword ptr [rcx+8],eax
mov     eax,dword ptr [rcx+8]
add     eax,edx
mov     dword ptr [rcx+8],eax
mov     eax,dword ptr [rcx+8]
add     eax,edx
mov     dword ptr [rcx+8],eax
mov     eax,dword ptr [rcx+8]
add     eax,edx
mov     dword ptr [rcx+8],eax
add     r8d,4
cmp     r8d,989680h
jl      loop_start
rep ret

As you can see from the assembly, Method A is going to be significantly faster since the values of A and B are both put in registers, and all of the additions occur there with no intermediate writes to memory. Method B on the other hand incurs a load and store to "A" in memory for every single iteration.

2

In case 1 a is clearly stored in a register. Anything else would be a horrible compilation result.

Probably, the .NET JIT is not willing/able to convert the stores to A to register stores in case 2.

I doubt this is forced by the .NET memory model because other threads can never tell the difference between your two methods if they only observe A to be 0 or the sum. They cannot disprove the theory that the optimization never happened. That makes it allowed under the semantics of the .NET abstract machine.

It is not suprising to see the .NET JIT perform little optimizations. This is well known to followers of the performance tag on Stack Overflow.

I know from experience that the JIT is much more likely to cache memory loads in registers. That's why case 1 (apparently) does not access B with each iteration.

Register computations are cheaper that memory accesses. This is even true if the memory in question is in the CPU L1 cache (as it is the case here).

I thought only locals were eligible for CPU caching?

This cannot be so because the CPU does not even know what a local is. All addresses look the same.

6
  • The final part made me wonder; is there such thing as field access at all after JIT compilation? If not then accessing field A.B.C.D would be as fast as just accessing A right?
    – toplel32
    Nov 24, 2014 at 18:50
  • The address of D can only be calculated after navigating through A.B, B.C and B.D if those are reference types. That's expensive because it stalls the pipeline.
    – usr
    Nov 24, 2014 at 21:14
  • If all these types are value types the offset of D in A is statically known and accessing D is as fast as any other field.
    – usr
    Nov 24, 2014 at 21:20
  • @usr: It should be essentially as fast, provided that none of the fields have been declared readonly. Unless things have changed since I last checked, having the outermost field be readonly will cause var x=A.B.C.D to be evaluated as var temp1=A; var temp2=temp1.B; var temp3=temp2.C; var x=temp3.D;. If A is large, that can be very expensive. (Yes, I know MS advises against large structures, but they can be very efficient if they are never needlessly copied; unfortunately, if one isn't careful, structures can easy get copied a lot more often than intended).
    – supercat
    Nov 24, 2014 at 22:54
  • @supercat assume that it was A...D++. This is compiled by obtaining a managed pointer to D and writing to it (in-place). I assume reads are done the same way. This only for l-values (fields, array elements). For methods what you are saying is true.
    – usr
    Nov 25, 2014 at 8:49
-2

method2 : field is read ~100x and set ~100x too = 200x larg_0 (this) + 100x ldfld (load field) + 100x stfld (set field) + 100x ldloc (local)

method1 : field is read 100x but not set it is equivalent to method1 minus 100x ldarg_0 (this)

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