5

I've been looking everywhere for an answer to this, and I just can't get it to work.

I have an input file that is read into an array using perl. The file is text file containing a table. Perl reads it in as an array, with each element being a full line (including all five columns). This is what the array looks like:

0__len__340   16    324    0    0.0470588235294118
1__len__251   2     249    0    0.00796812749003984
2__len__497   0     497    0    0
3__len__55    7     48     0    0.127272727272727
4__len__171   0     171    0    0
5__len__75    0     75     0    0
6__len__160   75    85     0    0.46875
7__len__285   1     284    0    0.00350877192982456
8__len__94    44    50     0    0.468085106382979

I need to sort this table by the last column in descending order. So my output should be:

6__len__160   75    85     0    0.46875
8__len__94    44    50     0    0.468085106382979
3__len__55    7     48     0    0.127272727272727
0__len__340   16    324    0    0.0470588235294118
1__len__251   2     249    0    0.00796812749003984
7__len__285   1     284    0    0.00350877192982456
2__len__497   0     497    0    0
4__len__171   0     171    0    0
5__len__75    0     75     0    0

I've tried a few approaches, but none have worked. Here's the code I've tried:

@input = <FILENAME>;
#Close the file
close FILENAME;
my @fractions;
my $y = 0;
for (my $x = 1; $x <= $#input; ++$x) {
    $fractions[$y] = (split (/\s/,$input[$x]))[4];
    ++$y;
}
my @sorted = sort {$b <=> $a} @fractions;
my $e = 1;
my $z = 0;
my $f = 0;
my @final;
 do {
    do {
        if ((split (/\s/,$input[$e]))[4] == $sorted[$z]){
            $final[$f] = $input[$e];
            ++$e;
            ++$f;
        } else { 
            ++$e;
        }
    } until ($e > $#input); 
    do {
        ++$z;
    } until ($sorted[$z] != $sorted[$z - 1]);
$e = 0;
} until ($z > $#sorted);
for (my $h = 0; $h <= $#final; ++$h) {
    print $final[$h] . "\n\n";

}

With this one I basically tried to put the column 5 numbers into their own array, sort them, and then go back through the original array and pull out the elements that match the sorted array, and put them into the final array. This may work if I keep working on it, but it takes so long to run that it's impractical. This small table I'm using to test my code with took a long time for this to run, and once the code is working it will be dealing with a table that has millions of rows.

I also tried applying the sort command to the table itself, but my output is the exact same table as my input...it doesn't get sorted.

@input = <FILENAME>;
close FILENAME;
my @sorted = sort { $b->[4] <=> $a->[4] } @input;
for (my $h = 0; $h <= $#sorted; ++$h) {
    print $sorted[$h] . "\n\n";
}
exit;

Lastly, I tried to put the array into a hash where the key was the first four columns, since the first column name is unique, and the values being the fifth column. Then I hoped I could sort the hash by the values and the keys would stay with their assigned values. I couldn't get this to work either, though unfortunately it was a couple days ago and I erased the code. One problem was that I couldn't figure out how to split the string only before the fifth column, so I end up with two strings, one containing the first four columns and one containing the fifth.

Anyone who could show me what I'm doing wrong with the sort command or who might have a better idea of how to do this, I'd really appreciate the help!

  • 2
    The unix sort command can do this: sort -k5 -n -r file – toolic Nov 24 '14 at 19:23
  • "portable" emergency when not on Unix sort :-) perl -E 'say sort { (split(/\s+/,$b))[4] <=> (split(/\s+/,$a))[4] } <>' – G. Cito Nov 24 '14 at 22:17
3

In your last code example you can replace

my @sorted = sort { $b->[4] <=> $a->[4] } @input;

with

my @sorted = sort { (split(' ', $b))[4] <=> (split(' ', $a))[4] } @input;

or even

my @sorted = sort { (split(/\s+/, $b))[4] <=> (split(/\s+/, $a))[4] } @input;

if input data has no lines with leading spaces.

  • note that the essential thing here is splitting on ' ' (which is special shorthand for splitting on /\s+/ but ignoring leading whitespace too) rather than on /\s/ (which splits on a single whitespace, leading to the "fifth column" not actually containing the desired data, since most columns are separated by multiple spaces) – ysth Nov 24 '14 at 19:30
  • @ysth yes, I'm aware of that, but can't see line in example above which would be problematic in that sense? – Сухой27 Nov 24 '14 at 19:34
  • That works, thank you so much! I had tried inserting the split function into my sort statement before, but maybe using /\s/ instead of ' ' was messing it up, or I made some other mistake. Thanks again! – Lisa Nov 24 '14 at 19:42
  • @Lisa as some has already mentioned, \s splits data only on ONE white space character, while in your case there are many of them between columns, so \s+ which takes them all into account is more appropriate. – Сухой27 Nov 24 '14 at 19:46
  • 1
    @mpapec @ysth see oneliner variant above :-) ... it always seems that a shorter version map and/or autosplit (with @F) should be possible but ... – G. Cito Nov 24 '14 at 22:21
2

You might also like the nsort_by function from List::UtilsBy:

use List::UtilsBy 'rev_nsort_by';

my @sorted = rev_nsort_by { (split(' ', $_))[4] } @input;
1

In case this helps folks dropping by in the future - here are some inelegant attempts to sort() the content of lines.txt (data from question), by its fifth column, with a perl one liner. This should work:

perl -E 'say "@$_" for sort {$a->[4] <=> $b->[4]} map {[(split)]} <>' file

This is more or less the same thing but with the split "automated" with the autosplit (-a) switch which creates the @F array:

perl -anE 'push @t,[@F]}{say "@$_" for sort {$a->[4] <=> $b->[4]} @t' file

If the split pattern is not whitespace, you can substitute it for the default (\s+) shown here:

perl -E 'say sort {(split(/\s+/,$a))[4] <=> (split(/\s+/,$b))[4]} <>' file

This is the shortest way to sort and print the fifth column:

perl -E 'say for sort map{ (split)[4] } <>' file

Transforming the sort

Can we map, split and sort in one pass? This is a short way to sort the fifth column:

perl -E 'say for sort map{ [(split)[4], $_]->[0] } <>' file

Dissecting this last example: perl first maps the STDIN to split() - making a list; takes the fifth element (i.e. [4]) of this split() list and wraps that list item and the whole line that was just read ($_) inside an array constructor []; then takes the first element of that anonymous array (i.e. the fifth column of each line) and passes it to sort(). Phew!

This just prints the fifth column since we only passed the first element ->[0] of the anonymous array to sort. To print the whole line sorted by the column in this way we need to pass the whole anonymous array to sort and tell sort to use the element which holds the column's contents to do its work, and then pass the other element of the anonymous array (the one that holds the entire line) to print (or say) - this way we can sort by the fifth column but print out the whole line:

perl -E 'say $_->[1] for sort{$a->[0] <=> $b->[0]} map{[(split)[4], $_]} <>' file

This is just like our very first example above. If, instead of running through the list that is created using for, we map the second element and pass it to print we get:

perl -E 'say map $_->[1], sort{$a->[0] <=> $b->[0]} map{[(split)[4],$_]} <>' file

We have reinvented the Schwartzian Transform which is such a great perl idiom that it is "built in" to perl6 ;-)


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