24

I am trying to send 2 strings from Python (3.2) to C using ctypes. This is a small part of my project on my Raspberry Pi. To test if the C function received the strings correctly, I place one of them in a text file.

Python code

string1 = "my string 1"
string2 = "my string 2"

# create byte objects from the strings
b_string1 = string1.encode('utf-8')
b_string2 = string2.encode('utf-8')

# send strings to c function
my_c_function(ctypes.create_string_buffer(b_string1),
              ctypes.create_string_buffer(b_string2))

C code

void my_c_function(const char* str1, const char* str2)
{
    // Test if string is correct
    FILE *fp = fopen("//home//pi//Desktop//out.txt", "w");
    if (fp != NULL)
    {
        fputs(str1, fp);
        fclose(fp);
    }

    // Do something with strings..
}

The problem

Only the first letter of the string appears in the text file.

I've tried many ways to convert the Python string object with ctypes.

  • ctypes.c_char_p
  • ctypes.c_wchar_p
  • ctypes.create_string_buffer

With these conversions I keep getting the error "wrong type" or "bytes or integer address expected instead of str instance".

I hope someone can tell me where it goes wrong. Thanks in advance.

4
  • 6
    Set my_c_function.argtypes = [ctypes.c_char_p, ctypes.c_char_p]. Then, because the parameters are const, simply call it as my_c_function(b_string1, b_string2). – Eryk Sun Nov 25 '14 at 14:38
  • 2
    FYI, a literal backslash character needs to be escaped as "\\", but it's not required for a forward slash. It's just "/home/pi/Desktop/out.txt". – Eryk Sun Nov 25 '14 at 14:42
  • 1
    @eryksun Thanks for your reply. It works now, I totally forgot I had argtypes still set on c_wchar_p. About the slashes, I always get them mixed up. – LittleOne Nov 25 '14 at 15:03
  • 5
    Only use buf = ctypes.create_string_buffer(bstr) when the function modifies the string. It's equivalent to buf = (ctypes.c_char * (len(bstr) + 1))(); buf.value = bstr. – Eryk Sun Nov 25 '14 at 15:12
32

Thanks to Eryksun the solution:

Python code

string1 = "my string 1"
string2 = "my string 2"

# create byte objects from the strings
b_string1 = string1.encode('utf-8')
b_string2 = string2.encode('utf-8')

# send strings to c function
my_c_function.argtypes = [ctypes.c_char_p, ctypes.char_p]
my_c_function(b_string1, b_string2)
3
  • 2
    my_c_function.argtypes = [ctypes.c_char_p, ctypes_char_p] You mean my_c_function.argtypes = [ctypes.c_char_p, ctypes.char_p] (notice . instead of _)? – hola Nov 18 '19 at 3:54
  • 1
    Haha, after 5 years someone noticed or felt bothered to point it out. Thanks for it, I edited it in the answer. – LittleOne Nov 19 '19 at 11:43
  • 1
    You know, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder! – hola Nov 26 '19 at 15:51
15

I think you just need to use c_char_p() instead of create_string_buffer().

string1 = "my string 1"
string2 = "my string 2"

# create byte objects from the strings
b_string1 = string1.encode('utf-8')
b_string2 = string2.encode('utf-8')

# send strings to c function
my_c_function(ctypes.c_char_p(b_string1),
              ctypes.c_char_p(b_string2))

If you need mutable strings then use create_string_buffer() and cast those to c_char_p using ctypes.cast().

0
1

Have you considered using SWIG? I haven't tried it myself but here's what it would look like, without changing your C source:

/*mymodule.i*/

%module mymodule
extern void my_c_function(const char* str1, const char* str2);

This would make your Python source as simple as (skipping compilation):

import mymodule

string1 = "my string 1"
string2 = "my string 2"
my_c_function(string1, string2)

Note I'm not certain .encode('utf-8') is necessary if your source file is already UTF-8.

1

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