I have an AP running debian. My laptop connects to the AP and I am interested in using this AP to query DNS over Tor. My unbound config looks like this:

interface: 192.168.1.1
access-control: 192.168.1.0/24 allow
do-not-query-address: 127.0.0.1/8
do-not-query-address: ::1
#do-not-query-localhost: no
tcp-upstream: yes
do-udp: yes
do-tcp: yes
forward-zone:
       name: "."
       forward-addr: 127.0.0.1@5353
       #forward-addr: 192.168.1.1@5353 #also tried this
       #forward-addr: 0.0.0.0@5353 #and this

My torrc looks like this:

DNSPort 5353
DNSListenAddress 192.168.1.1

However, regardless of how much I try, I cannot get unbound to query tor. When I log in to the AP, I am able to do:

tor-resolve google.com

and it works correctly. From my laptop if I try:

dig @192.168.1.1 -p 5353 google.com

It also works correctly. But if I do:

dig @192.168.1.1 -p 53 google.com

It returns empty (no error, quickly returns without an IP address). After much head banging I decided to ask here. Any help will be appreciated.

  • Is it possible to use iptables to forward all queries on port 53 to 5353 on your AP. I have a similar setup using only my local machine and with DNSPort 5353 in my torrc and iptables forwarding everything on 53 to 5353, I have no problems, and also no need for unbound. – flooose Feb 1 '15 at 11:19

Remove

tcp-upstream: yes

from your unbound.conf. When you specify DNSPort in torrc, it listens on UDP on that port, but not TCP.

Try to add this to your unbound.conf file:

do-not-query-localhost: no

(source: https://www.nlnetlabs.nl/bugs-script/show_bug.cgi?id=638)

  • Unfortunately, this is not relevant to the question. mkxa is trying to query a Tor instance running on another machine on their network (their AP), not localhost. – jbg Aug 7 '17 at 9:53

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