refer to this tutorial: http://matplotlib.org/1.4.0/examples/pylab_examples/contour_demo.html

Here is the prototype for the bivariate_normal function from mplotlib.mlab:

bivariate_normal(X, Y, sigmax=1.0, sigmay=1.0, mux=0.0, muy=0.0, sigmaxy=0.0)

X and Y define the grid, and we have arguments for the 2 dimensional means and covariance terms. As you can see, there is an argument at the end for a the covariance between x and y. Here's the thing: plt.contour() will plot bivariate normal contours if sigmaxy = 0. However, if sigmaxy has any other value, I get a

ValueError: zero-size array to reduction operation minimum which has no identity

For example,

Z =  bivariate_normal(X, Y, 1.0, 1.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0)
plt.contour(X,Y,Z)

works

But, the following does not work:

Z = bivariate_normal(X, Y, 1.0, 1.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0)
plt.contour(X,Y,Z)

Anyone familiar with matplotlib have any ideas? Thanks.

  • Are you sure that plt.contour raises the error? Isn't it bivariate_normal that chokes on your inputs? – hitzg Nov 27 '14 at 10:56
  • Hey hitzg. No, it's not. When I don't plot the contours and get values from the bivariate_normal function, it works fine. I'm gonna try writing my own bivariate function and try plotting it, maybe it'll work then. I'm just confused as to why it's not. – user3273422 Nov 28 '14 at 20:38
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It does not work because your covariance matrix is not positive definite. To see if your matrix is positive definite you can check whether all its eigenvalues are greater than zero.

Extreme case

import numpy as np
from matplotlib.mlab import bivariate_normal
from matplotlib import pylab as plt


cov_test = np.array([[1,0.999],
                     [0.999,1]])

print np.linalg.eigvals(cov_test)

[ 1.99900000e+00 1.00000000e-03]

You can see the second eigenvalue is super close to zero. Actually, if you plot it, you see this is really an extreme case of covariance:

x = np.arange(-3.0, 3.0, 0.1)
y = np.arange(-3.0, 3.0, 0.1)
X, Y = np.meshgrid(x, y)

Z = bivariate_normal(X, Y, cov_test[0,0], cov_test[1,1], 0.0, 0.0, cov_test[0,1])
plt.contour(X,Y,Z)

enter image description here

Non positive definite case:

And if you go a bit further...

import numpy as np
from matplotlib import pylab as plt

cov_test = np.array([[1,1],
                 [1,1]])

print np.linalg.eigvals(cov_test)

[ 2. 0.]

Then the second eigenvalue reaches 0, this is not positive definite and if you try to plot it then:

x = np.arange(-3.0, 3.0, 0.1)
y = np.arange(-3.0, 3.0, 0.1)
X, Y = np.meshgrid(x, y)

Z = bivariate_normal(X, Y, cov_test[0,0], cov_test[1,1], 0.0, 0.0, cov_test[0,1])
plt.contour(X,Y,Z)

You get the error:

ValueError: zero-size array to reduction operation minimum which has no identity`

Actually, my Z is now full of NaN

  • thanks for your reply, but I'm actually getting this error even when my covariance matrix is positive definite (confirmed by checking eigenvalues). can you think of any other potential reasons this error would occur? – grisaitis Jan 5 '15 at 14:33
  • Which are your eigenvalues? It happened to me that if they are too close to zero it considers it as non positive definite. Show me your matrices so that I can re-try it. – alberto Jan 5 '15 at 20:28
  • 1
    By the way, in the bivariate_normal function, for the diagonal of the covariance matrix you should use the squared values! – alberto Jan 7 '15 at 9:34
  • 1
    In your examples you are passing cov_test[r,c] into bivariate_normal(), but as far as I can tell from experiments and the documentation, it takes stddev (square root of variance), not direct variance. – Ben Jackson Nov 21 '16 at 22:23

To take the notation from the accepted answer:

cov_test = np.array([[..., ...],
                     [..., ...]])

You need to pass the standard deviation (in the arguments sigmax and sigmay), not the variance:

Z = bivariate_normal(X, Y, np.sqrt(cov_test[0,0]), np.sqrt(cov_test[1,1]),
                     0.0, 0.0, cov_test[0,1])

For whatever reason, the sigmaxy argument is the actual entry from the covariance matrix (actually rho*sigmax*sigmay).

For any nontrivial example, the code will blow up when it tries to calculate rho if you try to pass in either all covariance or all sqrt covariance.

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