288

I met an interesting issue about C#. I have code like below.

List<Func<int>> actions = new List<Func<int>>();

int variable = 0;
while (variable < 5)
{
    actions.Add(() => variable * 2);
    ++ variable;
}

foreach (var act in actions)
{
    Console.WriteLine(act.Invoke());
}

I expect it to output 0, 2, 4, 6, 8. However, it actually outputs five 10s.

It seems that it is due to all actions referring to one captured variable. As a result, when they get invoked, they all have same output.

Is there a way to work round this limit to have each action instance have its own captured variable?

8
  • 17
    See also Eric Lippert's Blog series on the subject: Closing over the Loop Variable Considered Harmful
    – Brian
    Commented Nov 11, 2010 at 21:50
  • 1
  • 5
    @Neal: although this example still doesn't work properly in C# 5, as it still outputs five 10s
    – Ian Oakes
    Commented Feb 6, 2014 at 5:41
  • 8
    It verified that it outputs five 10s till today on C# 6.0 (VS 2015). I doubt that this behavior of closure variables is a candidate for change. Captured variables are always evaluated when the delegate is actually invoked, not when the variables were captured.
    – RBT
    Commented Apr 22, 2017 at 3:03
  • 2
    Eric Lippert's blog series on this subject are now here and here. Commented Jun 12, 2020 at 15:44

11 Answers 11

268

Yes - take a copy of the variable inside the loop:

while (variable < 5)
{
    int copy = variable;
    actions.Add(() => copy * 2);
    ++ variable;
}

You can think of it as if the C# compiler creates a "new" local variable every time it hits the variable declaration. In fact it'll create appropriate new closure objects, and it gets complicated (in terms of implementation) if you refer to variables in multiple scopes, but it works :)

Note that a more common occurrence of this problem is using for or foreach:

for (int i=0; i < 10; i++) // Just one variable
foreach (string x in foo) // And again, despite how it reads out loud

See section 7.14.4.2 of the C# 3.0 spec for more details of this, and my article on closures has more examples too.

Note that as of the C# 5 compiler and beyond (even when specifying an earlier version of C#), the behavior of foreach changed so you no longer need to make local copy. See this answer for more details.

6
  • 41
    Jon's book also has a very good chapter on this (stop being humble, Jon!) Commented Nov 7, 2008 at 7:57
  • 47
    It looks better if I let other people plug it ;) (I confess that I do tend to vote up answers recommending it though.)
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Nov 7, 2008 at 8:03
  • 2
    As ever, feedback to [email protected] would be appreciated :)
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Nov 7, 2008 at 9:30
  • 7
    For C# 5.0 behavior is different (more reasonable) see newer answer by Jon Skeet - stackoverflow.com/questions/16264289/… Commented Jan 22, 2016 at 2:35
  • 2
    @Florimond: That's just not how closures work in C#. They capture variables, not values. (That's true regardless of loops, and is easily demonstrated with a lambda that captures a variable, and just prints the current value whenever it's executed.)
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Apr 29, 2019 at 17:27
29

I believe what you are experiencing is something known as Closure http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Closure_(computer_science). Your lamba has a reference to a variable which is scoped outside the function itself. Your lamba is not interpreted until you invoke it and once it is it will get the value the variable has at execution time.

17

Behind the scenes, the compiler is generating a class that represents the closure for your method call. It uses that single instance of the closure class for each iteration of the loop. The code looks something like this, which makes it easier to see why the bug happens:

void Main()
{
    List<Func<int>> actions = new List<Func<int>>();

    int variable = 0;

    var closure = new CompilerGeneratedClosure();

    Func<int> anonymousMethodAction = null;

    while (closure.variable < 5)
    {
        if(anonymousMethodAction == null)
            anonymousMethodAction = new Func<int>(closure.YourAnonymousMethod);

        //we're re-adding the same function 
        actions.Add(anonymousMethodAction);

        ++closure.variable;
    }

    foreach (var act in actions)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(act.Invoke());
    }
}

class CompilerGeneratedClosure
{
    public int variable;

    public int YourAnonymousMethod()
    {
        return this.variable * 2;
    }
}

This isn't actually the compiled code from your sample, but I've examined my own code and this looks very much like what the compiler would actually generate.

14

This has nothing to do with loops.

This behavior is triggered because you use a lambda expression () => variable * 2 where the outer scoped variable not actually defined in the lambda's inner scope.

Lambda expressions (in C#3+, as well as anonymous methods in C#2) still create actual methods. Passing variables to these methods involve some dilemmas (pass by value? pass by reference? C# goes with by reference - but this opens another problem where the reference can outlive the actual variable). What C# does to resolve all these dilemmas is to create a new helper class ("closure") with fields corresponding to the local variables used in the lambda expressions, and methods corresponding to the actual lambda methods. Any changes to variable in your code is actually translated to change in that ClosureClass.variable

So your while loop keeps updating the ClosureClass.variable until it reaches 10, then you for loops executes the actions, which all operate on the same ClosureClass.variable.

To get your expected result, you need to create a separation between the loop variable, and the variable that is being closured. You can do this by introducing another variable, i.e.:

List<Func<int>> actions = new List<Func<int>>();
int variable = 0;
while (variable < 5)
{
    var t = variable; // now t will be closured (i.e. replaced by a field in the new class)
    actions.Add(() => t * 2);
    ++variable; // changing variable won't affect the closured variable t
}
foreach (var act in actions)
{
    Console.WriteLine(act.Invoke());
}

You could also move the closure to another method to create this separation:

List<Func<int>> actions = new List<Func<int>>();

int variable = 0;
while (variable < 5)
{
    actions.Add(Mult(variable));
    ++variable;
}

foreach (var act in actions)
{
    Console.WriteLine(act.Invoke());
}

You can implement Mult as a lambda expression (implicit closure)

static Func<int> Mult(int i)
{
    return () => i * 2;
}

or with an actual helper class:

public class Helper
{
    public int _i;
    public Helper(int i)
    {
        _i = i;
    }
    public int Method()
    {
        return _i * 2;
    }
}

static Func<int> Mult(int i)
{
    Helper help = new Helper(i);
    return help.Method;
}

In any case, "Closures" are NOT a concept related to loops, but rather to anonymous methods / lambda expressions use of local scoped variables - although some incautious use of loops demonstrate closures traps.

12

The way around this is to store the value you need in a proxy variable, and have that variable get captured.

I.E.

while( variable < 5 )
{
    int copy = variable;
    actions.Add( () => copy * 2 );
    ++variable;
}
5
  • See the explanation in my edited answer. I'm finding the relevant bit of the spec now.
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Nov 7, 2008 at 7:35
  • Haha jon, I actually just read your article: csharpindepth.com/Articles/Chapter5/Closures.aspx You do good work my friend. Commented Nov 7, 2008 at 7:36
  • @tjlevine: Thanks very much. I'll add a reference to that in my answer. I'd forgotten about it!
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Nov 7, 2008 at 7:37
  • Also, Jon, I'd love to read about your thoughts on the various Java 7 closure proposals. I've seen you mention that you wanted to write one, but I haven't seen it. Commented Nov 7, 2008 at 7:42
  • 1
    @tjlevine: Okay, I promise to try to write it up by the end of the year :)
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Nov 7, 2008 at 7:54
8

Yes you need to scope variable within the loop and pass it to the lambda that way:

List<Func<int>> actions = new List<Func<int>>();

int variable = 0;
while (variable < 5)
{
    int variable1 = variable;
    actions.Add(() => variable1 * 2);
    ++variable;
}

foreach (var act in actions)
{
    Console.WriteLine(act.Invoke());
}

Console.ReadLine();
7

The same situation is happening in multi-threading (C#, .NET 4.0].

See the following code:

Purpose is to print 1,2,3,4,5 in order.

for (int counter = 1; counter <= 5; counter++)
{
    new Thread (() => Console.Write (counter)).Start();
}

The output is interesting! (It might be like 21334...)

The only solution is to use local variables.

for (int counter = 1; counter <= 5; counter++)
{
    int localVar= counter;
    new Thread (() => Console.Write (localVar)).Start();
}
2
  • This does not seem to help me. Still non-deterministic. Commented Jan 31, 2014 at 11:14
  • This has nothing to do with why you need to "redeclare" the variable you want to capture. This solely has to do with the fact that the second thread might be "ready for work" faster on the OS level, or that the executing code gets scheduled earlier. Your second example isn't going to output 1-5 every time either. It might in Debug, because that's magnitudes slower, but it definitely won't in Release builds. Commented Oct 7, 2021 at 10:11
2

As others said It has nothing to do with loops.It is the effect of the variable capture mechanism in the body of anonymous functions in C#. When you define lambda as your example ;

actions.Add(() => variable * 2);

Compiler generates a container class like <>c__DisplayClass0_0 for the lambda function () => () => variable * 2.

Inside of the generated class(container) it generates a field named as variable, having a captured variable with the same name and the method b__0() containing the body of the lambda.

[CompilerGenerated]
private sealed class <>c__DisplayClass0_0
{
public int variable;

internal int <Main>b__0()
{
    return variable * 2;
}
}

And than local variable named variable, becomes a field of a container class(<>c__DisplayClass0_0)

<>c__DisplayClass0_.variable = 0;
while (<>c__DisplayClass0_.variable < 5)
{
    list.Add(new Func<int>(<>c__DisplayClass0_.<Main>b__0));
    <>c__DisplayClass0_.variable++;
}

So incrementing variable results in turn incrementing field of container class and because we get one instance of the container class for all iterations of the while loop,we get same output that is 10.

enter image description here

You can prevent by reassigning captured variable inside the body of the loop to a new local variable

while (variable < 5)
{
    var index = variable; // <= this line
    actions.Add(() => index * 2);
    ++ variable;
}

By the way,this behaviour still is valid with .Net 8 Preview and I find this behaviour is very buggy and deceptive.

-1
for (int n=0; n < 10; n++) //forloop syntax
foreach (string item in foo) foreach syntax
2
  • 3
    It doesn't make harm to add some lines of explanation to code samples ;) Commented Dec 24, 2020 at 14:52
  • Ok @MaksymRudenko Commented Jun 10, 2021 at 7:50
-2

It is called the closure problem, simply use a copy variable, and it's done.

List<Func<int>> actions = new List<Func<int>>();

int variable = 0;
while (variable < 5)
{
    int i = variable;
    actions.Add(() => i * 2);
    ++ variable;
}

foreach (var act in actions)
{
    Console.WriteLine(act.Invoke());
}
1
  • 5
    In what way your answer is different from the answer provided by someone above? Commented Jan 30, 2019 at 7:38
-2

Since no one here directly quoted ECMA-334:

10.4.4.10 For statements

Definite assignment checking for a for-statement of the form:

for (for-initializer; for-condition; for-iterator) embedded-statement

is done as if the statement were written:

{
    for-initializer;
    while (for-condition) {
        embedded-statement;
    LLoop: for-iterator;
    }
}

Further on in the spec,

12.16.6.3 Instantiation of local variables

A local variable is considered to be instantiated when execution enters the scope of the variable.

[Example: For example, when the following method is invoked, the local variable x is instantiated and initialized three times—once for each iteration of the loop.

static void F() {
  for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    int x = i * 2 + 1;
    ...
  }
}

However, moving the declaration of x outside the loop results in a single instantiation of x:

static void F() {
  int x;
  for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    x = i * 2 + 1;
    ...
  }
}

end example]

When not captured, there is no way to observe exactly how often a local variable is instantiated—because the lifetimes of the instantiations are disjoint, it is possible for each instantation to simply use the same storage location. However, when an anonymous function captures a local variable, the effects of instantiation become apparent.

[Example: The example

using System;

delegate void D();

class Test{
  static D[] F() {
    D[] result = new D[3];
    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
      int x = i * 2 + 1;
      result[i] = () => { Console.WriteLine(x); };
    }
  return result;
  }
  static void Main() {
    foreach (D d in F()) d();
  }
}

produces the output:

1
3
5

However, when the declaration of x is moved outside the loop:

static D[] F() {
  D[] result = new D[3];
  int x;
  for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    x = i * 2 + 1;
    result[i] = () => { Console.WriteLine(x); };
  }
  return result;
}

the output is:

5
5
5

Note that the compiler is permitted (but not required) to optimize the three instantiations into a single delegate instance (§11.7.2).

If a for-loop declares an iteration variable, that variable itself is considered to be declared outside of the loop. [Example: Thus, if the example is changed to capture the iteration variable itself:

static D[] F() {
  D[] result = new D[3];
  for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    result[i] = () => { Console.WriteLine(i); };
  }
  return result;
}

only one instance of the iteration variable is captured, which produces the output:

3
3
3

end example]

Oh yea, I guess it should be mentioned that in C++ this problem doesn't occur because you can choose if the variable is captured by value or by reference (see: Lambda capture).

0

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