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I came across some HTML recently that denoted a style this way:

<style type="text/css">
     ${demo.css}
</style>

Obviously, this is including the "demo.css" file. But I've never seen CSS written this way. I've only seen the @import syntax for including files.

A cursory search around Google turned up nothing. Is this syntax documented anywhere? Is this some sort of templating thing?

  • "Obviously, this is including the "demo.css" file." Not in plain CSS it's not. There are attribute selectors that use $, like a[href$=".pdf"], but that's not what you have. – j08691 Nov 26 '14 at 20:14
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    This must be templating. – Scimonster Nov 26 '14 at 20:14
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    Some languages like JSP use a syntax like this. ${var_name} will inject that value of a variable var_name on the page. – Vincent Ramdhanie Nov 26 '14 at 20:18
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    @j08691 I think OP meant "obviously the purpose of this code is to include the demo.css file" – TylerH Nov 26 '14 at 20:24
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    @TylerH - Yes, but in plain CSS it won't do anything. Odds are, as others have mentioned, that there's some sort of templating involved. – j08691 Nov 26 '14 at 20:26
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That isn't CSS.

It looks like it is probably part of an HTML template (the syntax is used in Angular, for instance) that will be processed by a programming language before outputting a style element with actual CSS in it.

  • Interesting. I'm not using a template, though. This is just a static HTML file I downloaded to demo a Javascript library. – davidmerrick Nov 26 '14 at 20:24
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    @dmerica - then it may be the JavaScript that's parsing that code. – j08691 Nov 26 '14 at 20:27
  • Looking around the directories I downloaded along with this example code, I've noticed that there actually is no demo.css file anywhere. Maybe they left it in on accident, and maybe the $ syntax is leftover from a template they'd used before. But from what you and others have said, this seems to be the correct answer. It's not CSS at all. – davidmerrick Nov 26 '14 at 22:33

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