98

I am trying to search through a Pandas Dataframe to find where it has a missing entry or a NaN entry.

Here is a dataframe that I am working with:

cl_id       a           c         d         e        A1              A2             A3
    0       1   -0.419279  0.843832 -0.530827    text76        1.537177      -0.271042
    1       2    0.581566  2.257544  0.440485    dafN_6        0.144228       2.362259
    2       3   -1.259333  1.074986  1.834653    system                       1.100353
    3       4   -1.279785  0.272977  0.197011     Fifty       -0.031721       1.434273
    4       5    0.578348  0.595515  0.553483   channel        0.640708       0.649132
    5       6   -1.549588 -0.198588  0.373476     audio       -0.508501               
    6       7    0.172863  1.874987  1.405923    Twenty             NaN            NaN
    7       8   -0.149630 -0.502117  0.315323  file_max             NaN            NaN

NOTE: The blank entries are empty strings - this is because there was no alphanumeric content in the file that the dataframe came from.

If I have this dataframe, how can I find a list with the indexes where the NaN or blank entry occurs?

2
  • 3
    Are the blank entries empty strings? Or are they strings containing whitespace...?
    – unutbu
    Nov 26, 2014 at 21:43
  • 2
    Added to the original post. The blank entries are just empty strings.
    – edesz
    Nov 26, 2014 at 22:26

10 Answers 10

87

np.where(pd.isnull(df)) returns the row and column indices where the value is NaN:

In [152]: import numpy as np
In [153]: import pandas as pd
In [154]: np.where(pd.isnull(df))
Out[154]: (array([2, 5, 6, 6, 7, 7]), array([7, 7, 6, 7, 6, 7]))

In [155]: df.iloc[2,7]
Out[155]: nan

In [160]: [df.iloc[i,j] for i,j in zip(*np.where(pd.isnull(df)))]
Out[160]: [nan, nan, nan, nan, nan, nan]

Finding values which are empty strings could be done with applymap:

In [182]: np.where(df.applymap(lambda x: x == ''))
Out[182]: (array([5]), array([7]))

Note that using applymap requires calling a Python function once for each cell of the DataFrame. That could be slow for a large DataFrame, so it would be better if you could arrange for all the blank cells to contain NaN instead so you could use pd.isnull.

4
  • For the blank/missing entries (applymap), is there a way to put this in a list? ex.: is there a way to extract a list as [2,5], corresponding to index 2 and index 5?
    – edesz
    Nov 26, 2014 at 22:25
  • 2
    You could make a list of "coordinates" with zip(np.where(df.applymap(lambda x: x == '')))
    – unutbu
    Nov 26, 2014 at 23:06
  • 3
    The suggestion in this answer is what I have used: df = df.replace('', np.nan) to replace the blank strings by NaN and then df.loc[df.isna().any(axis=1)] to get the output DataFrame. By doing this, as suggested by @unutbu, there is no need for the slow .apply() or .applymap().
    – edesz
    Jun 17, 2019 at 23:03
  • Adding more details to the above answer, you can get column numbers with null values by print(set((np.where(pd.isnull(train_df)))[1])) and print the column names using df.columns[<column-number-with-null-value>] Jan 22, 2020 at 15:04
61

Try this:

df[df['column_name'] == ''].index

and for NaNs you can try:

pd.isna(df['column_name'])
25

Check if the columns contain Nan using .isnull() and check for empty strings using .eq(''), then join the two together using the bitwise OR operator |.

Sum along axis 0 to find columns with missing data, then sum along axis 1 to the index locations for rows with missing data.

missing_cols, missing_rows = (
    (df2.isnull().sum(x) | df2.eq('').sum(x))
    .loc[lambda x: x.gt(0)].index
    for x in (0, 1)
)

>>> df2.loc[missing_rows, missing_cols]
         A2       A3
2            1.10035
5 -0.508501         
6       NaN      NaN
7       NaN      NaN
2
  • 3
    This should be a new accepted answer as it gives the best overview of the missing values.
    – Kokokoko
    Aug 15, 2021 at 14:31
  • .eq('') also works inside .query(). So you can find them by df.query('column_name.eq("")', engine='python')
    – mrdaliri
    Apr 6, 2022 at 1:42
13

I've resorted to

df[ (df[column_name].notnull()) & (df[column_name]!=u'') ].index

lately. That gets both null and empty-string cells in one go.

2
  • What does the u string prefix do?
    – dumbledad
    May 28, 2020 at 10:39
  • 6
    many eons ago, in the age of python2.7, strings were not unicode by default, so to create a unicode string literal you had to prefix it with that u May 28, 2020 at 10:43
10

In my opinion, don't waste time and just replace with NaN! Then, search all entries with Na. (This is correct because empty values are missing values anyway).

import numpy as np                             # to use np.nan 
import pandas as pd                            # to use replace
    
df = df.replace(' ', np.nan)                   # to get rid of empty values
nan_values = df[df.isna().any(axis=1)]         # to get all rows with Na

nan_values                                     # view df with NaN rows only
1
  • 5
    Suggestion, it should be df.replace('', np.nan) - without the space when checking for empty Jun 29, 2022 at 21:55
4

Partial solution: for a single string column tmp = df['A1'].fillna(''); isEmpty = tmp=='' gives boolean Series of True where there are empty strings or NaN values.

3

you also do something good:

text_empty = df['column name'].str.len() > -1

df.loc[text_empty].index

The results will be the rows which are empty & it's index number.

3

Another opltion covering cases where there might be severar spaces is by using the isspace() python function.

df[df.col_name.apply(lambda x:x.isspace() == False)] # will only return cases without empty spaces

adding NaN values:

df[(df.col_name.apply(lambda x:x.isspace() == False) & (~df.col_name.isna())] 
1
  • alas...AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'isspace' Apr 16, 2021 at 7:44
1

To obtain all the rows that contains an empty cell in in a particular column.

DF_new_row=DF_raw.loc[DF_raw['columnname']=='']

This will give the subset of DF_raw, which satisfy the checking condition.

1

You can use string methods with regex to find cells with empty strings:

df[~df.column_name.str.contains('\w')].column_name.count()

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