8

Do Vectors resize automatically? Or do you need to check the current size periodically and resize when you need more room?

It looks to be resizing for me automatically but I'm not sure if that is a feature or the compiler waving a magic wand.

6
  • 13
    It resizes if you use insert or push_back, but not if you use the subscript operator (as std::map<> does).
    – ildjarn
    Commented Nov 27, 2014 at 5:37
  • Please check : stackoverflow.com/questions/12271017/… for complete analysis. Commented Nov 27, 2014 at 5:38
  • @PrakharAsthana that link's unrelated to this question... it's about initial capacity, not growth. Commented Nov 27, 2014 at 5:40
  • 1
    A vector will automatically grow if you use the insert(), emplace(), push_back(), emplace_back(), or resize() member functions. Commented Nov 27, 2014 at 5:46
  • 1
    The above answers are partial true, since vector will not shrink automatically..
    – FaceBro
    Commented Sep 28, 2016 at 11:54

2 Answers 2

14

If you use push_back or insert, yes vector resizes itself. Here is a demo:

#include<iostream>
#include<vector>

using namespace std;

int main() {
    vector < int > a;
    a.push_back(1);
    a.push_back(2);
    a.push_back(3);
    for (int value : a) {
        cout << value << " ";
    }
    cout << endl << "Current size: " << a.size() << endl;
    return 0;
}

It gives output as:

1 2 3
Current size: 3

Remember now if you do a[3] = 5. It will not resize your vector automatically.
Also you can manually resize vector if you want. For demo append following code to above code.

a.resize(6);
for (int value : a) {
    cout << value << " ";
}
cout << endl << "Current size: " << a.size() << endl;

Now it will output:

1 2 3
Current size: 3
1 2 3 0 0 0
Current size: 6

I think you got your answer.

8
  • Nit pick: vector<int>::iterator it; ... for(it = a.begin(); it < a.end(); it++) - would be better as ... for (vector<int>::iterator it = a.begin(); it != a.end(); ++it). (i.e. defining variable in the tightest useful scope, != is idiomatic as it works for all Standard containers, ++it to avoid reliance on optimiser to eliminate temporary). Commented Nov 27, 2014 at 7:23
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    Or even for range for (const auto& e : a) { std::cout << e << " "; } since C++11.
    – Jarod42
    Commented Nov 27, 2014 at 8:22
  • @TonyD I mostly code in C and I am new to C++, So most of my C++ code looks like C. Also it does not affect the answer. Anyway, thanks for mentioning I will update it.
    – Ashwani
    Commented Nov 27, 2014 at 9:51
  • @AshwaniDausodia: sure - no worries. True "does not affect the answe" but other beginners see this stuff and might pick up habits.... Cheers. Commented Nov 27, 2014 at 9:55
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    I refactored your code to use the more idiomatic (since C++11) ranged-for loop. I've done this because this question was featured on the isocpp.org feed, so it is likely to get much higher exposure. Commented Dec 8, 2014 at 18:27
4

Do Vectors resize automatically?

Yes, they do, and you can convince yourself of that very easily:

std::vector<int> squares;
for (int i = 0; i < 100; ++i)
{
    squares.push_back(i * i);
    std::cout << "size: " << squares.size() << "\n";
}

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