In this question, you are given a value V and a list of unique integers. Your job is to find the number of distinct subsets of size 4 that sum up to V. Each element in the list can be used only once. If none of such subset can be found, output 0 instead.

For example, if the integers are [3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] and the value is 30, the output should be 5. The subsets are:

[3, 8, 9, 10]
[4, 7, 9, 10]
[5, 6, 9, 10]
[5, 7, 8, 10]
[6, 7, 8, 9].

It is not hard to solve this question, the most direct way is to nest for-loop four times. What's the Clojure way to do it?

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here is how I would've done it:

(ns example.solve
  (:require [clojure.math.combinatorics :as combo]))

(defn solve
  [s n v]
  (filter (comp (partial = v)
                (partial reduce +))
          (combo/combinations s n)))

I'm using math.combinatorics in my example, because it's a simplest way to get all combinations of 4 elements from a list.

Here is an example of using solve:

=> (solve [3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10] 4 30)
((3 8 9 10) (4 7 9 10) (5 6 9 10) (5 7 8 10) (6 7 8 9))
  • 2
    Very nice, just to illustrate the answer: (solve [3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] 4 30) ((3 8 9 10) (4 7 9 10) (5 6 9 10) (5 7 8 10) (6 7 8 9)) – Jaime Agudo Nov 27 '14 at 14:18
  • @JamesSharp Thanx! Added your example to my answer. – Leonid Beschastny Nov 27 '14 at 14:29
  • 1
    The comp function is brilliant! Thank you. – Nick Nov 27 '14 at 15:13

I would use clojure.map.combinatorics/combinations to get all 4-element subsets and then filter out those that do not sum up to V.

Interestingly, this problem admits a (doubly?) recursive solution which involves only summing and counting (without actually generating the subsets.)

If you look at the initial element 3, then part of the solution is the number of sums taken from 3 elements in the rest of the sequence where the sum is 27, which is a smaller form of the same problem and can thus be solved recursively. The bottom of the recursion is when you are looking for sums produced from 1 element, which boils down to a simple check to see if the desired sum is in the list.

The other part of the solution involves looking at the next element 4, looking for sums in the rest of the list beyond the 4 equal to 26, and so on... This part can also be treated recursively.

Putting this together as a recursive function looks like the following, which produces the desired answer 5 for the example sequence.

(defn solve [xs n len]
  (if (seq xs)
    (if (= len 1)
       (if (some #{n} xs) 1 0)
       (+ (solve (rest xs)
                 (- n (first xs))
                 (dec len))
          (solve (rest xs) 
                 n
                 len)))
    0))

(solve [3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10] 30 4)               
;=> 5
  • I refactored your function to return the actual solution: gist.github.com/lbeschastny/e1f16b4f888bbb532526 – Leonid Beschastny Nov 27 '14 at 23:06
  • Nice! I like how your refactoring has the same shape but replaces + with concat and deals with building up lists where needed. Thanks—insightful! – Mike Fikes Nov 27 '14 at 23:19
  • This also allows some short-circuiting if we know that the numbers are all positive. – Thumbnail Nov 29 '14 at 12:09
  • @Thumbnail Yes. Perhaps if all are negative as well. Also the (seq xs) test could be expanded to consider len. The combinatorics solution is the simplest to understand IMHO, while this one appears to be fast. – Mike Fikes Nov 30 '14 at 15:30

In terms of directly answering the question, here is how you could do it using indexes and a for loop:

(defn solve-for [xs v]
  (for [ndx0 (range 0          (- (count xs) 3))
        ndx1 (range (inc ndx0) (- (count xs) 2))
        ndx2 (range (inc ndx1) (- (count xs) 1))
        ndx3 (range (inc ndx2) (count xs))
        :when (= v (+ (xs ndx0) (xs ndx1) (xs ndx2) (xs ndx3)))]
    (list (xs ndx0) (xs ndx1) (xs ndx2) (xs ndx3))))

FWIW, this turns out to be about 70% faster than the approach using clojure.math.combinatorics but twice as slow as the doubly-recursive solution.

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.