9

I have seen this Issue while building dynamic Expression Tree and Expression/Statement trees and since I am new to expression trees I am still struggling to understand how to achieve what I want.

A contrived object is below

    public class TestObject
    {
        public TestObject()
        {
            ClassList = new List<Class>();
        }
        public int Age { get; set; }
        public List<Class> ClassList { get; set; } 
    }

    public class Class
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public int ClassId { get; set; }
    }

At run time I iterate through each of the properties and generate a Delegate which does a conversion to string of that property. I have got all that working. The issue I have to deal with now is that for the List type, I need to be able to apply a set of actions to each item in the ClassList property so I need a foreach which allows me to do that.

I currently have this

//type==TestObject at runtime
//propertyName == "ClassList"
   ParameterExpression recordExpression = Expression.Parameter(type, "record");

   memberExpression = MemberExpression.Property(recordExpression, propertyName);

   Type getEnumerableDelegateType =
                typeof(Func<,>).MakeGenericType(new Type[] { type, memberExpression.Type}); 

   var getList = Expression.Lambda(getEnumerableDelegateType, memberExpression, recordExpression);

GetList when compiled and invoked returns the List as expected. What I m struggling with is how to create an expression which will use the result from the lambda expression and iterate over it applying the set of actions I have already created for each Class item.

Ultimately I am looking for a lambda signature to match the overallAction signature below

   var getListFunc = new Func<TestObject, List<Class>>((TestObject obj1) => obj1.ClassList);

   Action<List<Class>> listAction = delegate(List<Class> data)
                {
                    foreach (var dataChannelWithUnitse in data)
                    {
                        //Apply generated delegate
                    }
                };

     Action<TestObject> overallAction = delegate(TestObject data)
                {
                    var x = getListFunc.Invoke(data);
                    listAction.Invoke(x as List<Class>);
                };

Any help is appreciated to help me understand how to do this.

I have currently got this which is exceptioning with variable 'Input' of type 'TestObject' referenced from scope '', but it is not defined

    var typeParam = Expression.Parameter(type, "Input");
    var listVariable = Expression.Variable(memberExpression.Type, "List");
    var enumerator = Expression.Variable(typeof(IEnumerator<>).MakeGenericType(dataType));


    var enumeratorType = typeof(IEnumerator<>).MakeGenericType(dataType);
    var enumerableType = typeof(IEnumerable<>).MakeGenericType(dataType);
    var enumerableParam = Expression.Parameter(enumerableType, "ExtractedCollection");

    var getEnumeratorFunc = Expression.Call(enumerableParam, enumerableType.GetMethod("GetEnumerator"));
    var getEnumeratorLambda = Expression.Lambda(getEnumeratorFunc, enumerableParam);

    var t1 = Expression.Assign(listVariable, Expression.Invoke(getListLambda, typeParam));
    var t2 = Expression.Assign(enumerator, Expression.Invoke(getEnumeratorLambda, listVariable));


    var @break = Expression.Label();

    var funcBlock = Expression.Block(
        new ParameterExpression[] { listVariable, enumerator},

   t1,
   t2,

    Expression.Loop(
        Expression.IfThenElse(

            Expression.NotEqual(Expression.Call(enumerator,typeof(IEnumerator).GetMethod("MoveNext")),Expression.Constant(false)),
                                Expression.Invoke(enumerableExpressions[0],Expression.Property(enumerator, "Current")),

                      Expression.Break(@break))
            , @break), typeParam);



    Expression<Action<TestObject>> lm = Expression.Lambda<Action<TestObject>>(funcBlock,recordExpression);
    var d = lm.Compile(); **//this is exceptioning with " variable 'Input' of type 'TestObject' referenced from scope '', but it is not defined**
  • 2
    List<T> actually has a .ForEach() method that you could invoke. This does not generalize to any IEnumerable, but in this particular case it could help you simplify your code. – Jeroen Mostert Nov 28 '14 at 17:10
21

I got lost somewhere in the middle of your question (and if I've interpreted it incorrectly, please tell me, and I'll dive back into it), but I think this is what you're after:

public static Expression ForEach(Expression collection, ParameterExpression loopVar, Expression loopContent)
{
    var elementType = loopVar.Type;
    var enumerableType = typeof(IEnumerable<>).MakeGenericType(elementType);
    var enumeratorType = typeof(IEnumerator<>).MakeGenericType(elementType);

    var enumeratorVar = Expression.Variable(enumeratorType, "enumerator");
    var getEnumeratorCall = Expression.Call(collection, enumerableType.GetMethod("GetEnumerator"));
    var enumeratorAssign = Expression.Assign(enumeratorVar, getEnumeratorCall);

    // The MoveNext method's actually on IEnumerator, not IEnumerator<T>
    var moveNextCall = Expression.Call(enumeratorVar, typeof(IEnumerator).GetMethod("MoveNext"));

    var breakLabel = Expression.Label("LoopBreak");

    var loop = Expression.Block(new[] { enumeratorVar },
        enumeratorAssign,
        Expression.Loop(
            Expression.IfThenElse(
                Expression.Equal(moveNextCall, Expression.Constant(true)),
                Expression.Block(new[] { loopVar },
                    Expression.Assign(loopVar, Expression.Property(enumeratorVar, "Current")),
                    loopContent
                ),
                Expression.Break(breakLabel)
            ),
        breakLabel)
    );

    return loop;
}

To use it, you need to supply a collection to iterate over, an expression to substitute into the body of the loop, and a ParameterExpression which is used by the loop body expression, which will be assigned to the loop variable on each loop iteration.

I think sometimes examples speak louder than words...

var collection = Expression.Parameter(typeof(List<string>), "collection");
var loopVar = Expression.Parameter(typeof(string), "loopVar");
var loopBody = Expression.Call(typeof(Console).GetMethod("WriteLine", new[] { typeof(string) }), loopVar);
var loop = ForEach(collection, loopVar, loopBody);
var compiled = Expression.Lambda<Action<List<string>>>(loop, collection).Compile();
compiled(new List<string>() { "a", "b", "c" });

EDIT: As Jeroem Mostert correctly points out in the comments, this doesn't quite mirror the "real" behaviour of a foreach loop: this would make sure that it disposes the enumerator. (It would also create a new instance of the loop variable for each iteration, but that doesn't make sense with expressions). Implementing this is just a matter of turning the handle if you feel motivated enough!


For anyone watching at home, I've got a similar method for generating 'for' loops:

public static Expression For(ParameterExpression loopVar, Expression initValue, Expression condition, Expression increment, Expression loopContent)
{
    var initAssign = Expression.Assign(loopVar, initValue);

    var breakLabel = Expression.Label("LoopBreak");

    var loop = Expression.Block(new[] { loopVar },
        initAssign,
        Expression.Loop(
            Expression.IfThenElse(
                condition,
                Expression.Block(
                    loopContent,
                    increment
                ),
                Expression.Break(breakLabel)
            ),
        breakLabel)
    );

    return loop;
}

This is equivalent to the following statement, where the pseudo-variables match the Expressions in the method above:

for (loopVar = initValue; condition; increment)
{
    loopContent
}

Again, loopContent, condition, and increment are Expressions which uses loopVar, and loopVar is assigned on every iteration.

  • 1
    This is almost but not quite like the real foreach: IEnumerator<T> is disposable, and an actual foreach will dispose it. Of course, the vast majority of enumerators have do-nothing implementations (including all those of the standard collection classes) and this will generally work fine. The full semantics of foreach are actually pretty complicated because no interfaces are necessary at all (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa664754 is out of date but the language spec gives the nitty-gritty); I don't necessarily recommend implementing that except as a challenge. :-) – Jeroen Mostert Nov 28 '14 at 17:35
  • That's a good point, and there's a try/finally around that Dispose operation as well, if I remember correctly! I'll add a note to this effect in my answer – canton7 Nov 28 '14 at 17:46
  • 1
    Thank you all very much, was moved onto something else, just got back to it and it works perfectly! @canton7 – Bernard Feb 9 '15 at 20:14
3

Here's a slightly expanded version of canton7's excellent solution, taking into account the remarks about disposing the enumerator:

public static Expression ForEach(Expression enumerable, ParameterExpression loopVar, Expression loopContent)
{
    var elementType = loopVar.Type;
    var enumerableType = typeof(IEnumerable<>).MakeGenericType(elementType);
    var enumeratorType = typeof(IEnumerator<>).MakeGenericType(elementType);

    var enumeratorVar = Expression.Variable(enumeratorType, "enumerator");
    var getEnumeratorCall = Expression.Call(enumerable, enumerableType.GetMethod("GetEnumerator"));
    var enumeratorAssign = Expression.Assign(enumeratorVar, getEnumeratorCall);
    var enumeratorDispose = Expression.Call(enumeratorVar, typeof(IDisposable).GetMethod("Dispose"));

    // The MoveNext method's actually on IEnumerator, not IEnumerator<T>
    var moveNextCall = Expression.Call(enumeratorVar, typeof(IEnumerator).GetMethod("MoveNext"));

    var breakLabel = Expression.Label("LoopBreak");

    var trueConstant = Expression.Constant(true);

    var loop =
        Expression.Loop(
            Expression.IfThenElse(
                Expression.Equal(moveNextCall, trueConstant),
                Expression.Block(
                    new[] { loopVar },
                    Expression.Assign(loopVar, Expression.Property(enumeratorVar, "Current")),
                    loopContent),
                Expression.Break(breakLabel)),
            breakLabel);

    var tryFinally =
        Expression.TryFinally(
            loop,
            enumeratorDispose);

    var body =
        Expression.Block(
            new[] { enumeratorVar },
            enumeratorAssign,
            tryFinally);

    return body;
}
2

relatively_random's solution is great but foreach handles several other scenarios. Check these links to SharpLab to verify what is generated in each of them:

The use of the type returned by GetEnumerator() is very important so that value type enumerators are not boxed. All the collections in System.Collections.Generic have value type enumerator because calls to its methods are not virtual, resulting in a lot better performance.

Putting all together results in the following code:

static partial class ExpressionEx
{
    public static Expression ForEach<TSource>(Expression enumerable, Expression loopContent)
    {
        var enumerableType = enumerable.Type;
        var getEnumerator = enumerableType.GetMethod("GetEnumerator");
        if (getEnumerator is null)
            getEnumerator = typeof(IEnumerable<>).MakeGenericType(typeof(TSource)).GetMethod("GetEnumerator");
        var enumeratorType = getEnumerator.ReturnType;
        var enumerator = Expression.Variable(enumeratorType, "enumerator");

        return Expression.Block(new[] { enumerator },
            Expression.Assign(enumerator, Expression.Call(enumerable, getEnumerator)),
            EnumerationLoop(enumerator, loopContent));
    }

    public static Expression ForEach<TSource>(Expression enumerable, ParameterExpression loopVar, Expression loopContent)
    {
        var enumerableType = enumerable.Type;
        var getEnumerator = enumerableType.GetMethod("GetEnumerator");
        if (getEnumerator is null)
            getEnumerator = typeof(IEnumerable<>).MakeGenericType(typeof(TSource)).GetMethod("GetEnumerator");
        var enumeratorType = getEnumerator.ReturnType;
        var enumerator = Expression.Variable(enumeratorType, "enumerator");

        return Expression.Block(new[] { enumerator },
            Expression.Assign(enumerator, Expression.Call(enumerable, getEnumerator)),
            EnumerationLoop(enumerator,
                Expression.Block(new[] { loopVar },
                    Expression.Assign(loopVar, Expression.Property(enumerator, "Current")),
                    loopContent)));
    }

    static Expression EnumerationLoop(ParameterExpression enumerator, Expression loopContent)
    {
        var loop = While(
            Expression.Call(enumerator, typeof(IEnumerator).GetMethod("MoveNext")),
            loopContent);

        var enumeratorType = enumerator.Type;
        if (typeof(IDisposable).IsAssignableFrom(enumeratorType))
            return Using(enumerator, loop);

        if (!enumeratorType.IsValueType)
        {
            var disposable = Expression.Variable(typeof(IDisposable), "disposable");
            return Expression.TryFinally(
                loop,
                Expression.Block(new[] { disposable },
                    Expression.Assign(disposable, Expression.TypeAs(enumerator, typeof(IDisposable))),
                    Expression.IfThen(
                        Expression.NotEqual(disposable, Expression.Constant(null)),
                        Expression.Call(disposable, typeof(IDisposable).GetMethod("Dispose")))));
        }

        return loop;
    }

    public static Expression Using(ParameterExpression variable, Expression content)
    {
        var variableType = variable.Type;

        if (!typeof(IDisposable).IsAssignableFrom(variableType))
            throw new Exception($"'{variableType.FullName}': type used in a using statement must be implicitly convertible to 'System.IDisposable'");

        var getMethod = typeof(IDisposable).GetMethod("Dispose");

        if (variableType.IsValueType)
        {
            return Expression.TryFinally(
                content,
                Expression.Call(Expression.Convert(variable, typeof(IDisposable)), getMethod));
        }

        if (variableType.IsInterface)
        {
            return Expression.TryFinally(
                content,
                Expression.IfThen(
                    Expression.NotEqual(variable, Expression.Constant(null)),
                    Expression.Call(variable, getMethod)));
        }

        return Expression.TryFinally(
            content,
            Expression.IfThen(
                Expression.NotEqual(variable, Expression.Constant(null)),
                Expression.Call(Expression.Convert(variable, typeof(IDisposable)), getMethod)));
    }

    public static Expression While(Expression loopCondition, Expression loopContent)
    {
        var breakLabel = Expression.Label();
        return Expression.Loop(
            Expression.IfThenElse(
                loopCondition,
                loopContent,
                Expression.Break(breakLabel)),
            breakLabel);
    }
}

The ForEach without loopVar is useful to enumerate without getting the items. That's the case of Count() implementation.

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