2

I am building a full page slider that keeps the native scrollbar and allows the user to either free scroll, use the mouse wheel or navigation dots (on the left) to switch to a slide.

Once the user is on the last slide and tries to scroll down further, the whole slider moves up to reveal a simple scrollable section. If the user scrolls down and then tries to go back up, then this new section moves out of the way again and returns the slider back into view.

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/3odc8zmx/

The parts I'm struggling with:

  1. Only the first two navigation dots work. The third one DOES WORK if you area looking at the first slide. But doesn't do anything, if you are on slide 2. Note: the purple one is a short-cut to the second section of the page and not related to the slider.
  2. When moving to the last slide (via the dots, if you're on the first slide) it causes the code to make the whole slider move upwards as it sees this as the user has slid past the last slide as per the description above. I have tried to combat this using a variable called listen to stop the scroll event listening when using the showSlide method... but it seems to be true even though I set it to false, and only reset it to true again after the animation...
  3. When scrolling down using the mouse wheel, I can get to the second section and back up, but not to the first third section. I'm wondering if I could use the showSlide method to better handle this instead of the current dirty next and prev functions I have implemented.

Note: If the user has free-scrolled, when they use the mouse-wheel, I want the slider to snap to the nearest slide to correct itself... Any suggestions for how I could do this?

Can anyone offer some help?

Here's the JS:

var listen = true;

function nextSlide()
{
    $('#section1').stop(true,false).animate({
        scrollTop: $('#section1').scrollTop() + $(window).height()
    });
}

function prevSlide()
{
    $('#section1').stop(true,false).animate({
        scrollTop: -$('#section1').scrollTop() + $(window).height()
    });
}

function showSlide(index)
{
    var offset = $('#section1 div').eq(index).offset();
        offset = offset.top;
    if(offset){
        listen = false;
        $('.slide-dot').removeClass('active');
        $('.slide-dot').eq(index).addClass('active');       
        $('#section1').stop(true,false).animate({
            scrollTop: offset
        }, 500, function(){
            listen = true;
        });
    } else {
        alert('error');
    }
}

$(document).ready(function(){

    var fullHeight = 0;

    $('#section1 div').each(function(){
        fullHeight = fullHeight + $(this).height();
    });

    var lastScrollTop1 = 0;
    $('#section1').on('scroll', function(e){
        var st = $(this).scrollTop();
        if (st > lastScrollTop1){
            if( $('#section1').scrollTop() + $(window).height() == fullHeight) {
                if(listen){
                    $('body').addClass('shifted');
                }
            }
        }
        lastScrollTop1 = st;
    });

    $('#section1').on('mousewheel', function(e){
        e.preventDefault();
        var st = $(this).scrollTop();
        if (st > lastScrollTop1){
            nextSlide();
        } else {
            prevSlide();
        }
    });

    var lastScrollTop2 = 0;
    $('#section2').on('scroll', function(e){            
        var st = $(this).scrollTop();
        if (st > lastScrollTop1){
        } else {    
            if( st == 0 ){
                $('body').removeClass('shifted');
            }
        }
        lastScrollTop1 = st;
    });

    $('.slide-dots').css({'margin-top':-$('.slide-dots').height() / 2});    
    $('.slide-dot').first().addClass('active');

    $(document).on('click', '.slide-dot', function(e){
        e.preventDefault();
        showSlide( $(this).index() );
    });

    $(document).on('click', '.slide-dot-fake', function(e){
        e.preventDefault();
        $('body').addClass('shifted');
    });

});

And for those wondering why I'm not using something like fullPage.js, it's because it can't handle the way I want to transition between the two areas and have two scrollbars (one for each area).

6
  • 1
    Pretty sure fullPage.js is what you're looking for and has the capability to enable normal scrolling at the end of the page.
    – chdltest
    Commented Nov 27, 2014 at 18:44
  • 1
    alvarotrigo.com/fullPage/examples/scrolling.html in case you didn't believe me?
    – chdltest
    Commented Nov 27, 2014 at 18:50
  • maybe even alvarotrigo.com/multiScroll . They are not so actively maintained and have some issues with twitter bootstrap, but they're great anyhow. Commented Nov 27, 2014 at 18:52
  • Let me know if I'm wrong.
    – chdltest
    Commented Nov 27, 2014 at 18:57
  • I'd rather just get the one I have built working. I don't think I'm a million miles off. It'd be great if you could help. Thanks.
    – Cameron
    Commented Nov 27, 2014 at 22:25

2 Answers 2

4
+25

You can use:

e.originalEvent.wheelDelta

instead of:

st > lastScrollTop1

in the mousewheel event for your third problem to check if the user has scrolled up or down. And also change the +/- in prevSlide. I used dm4web's fiddle for your first problem. And I used:

scrollTop: offset - 1

instead of:

scrollTop: offset

for your second problem, because when the scroll reaches to the last pixel of the third element, it automatically goes to the next section, so 1 pixel is enough for it not to.

Here's the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/3odc8zmx/3/

1

As suggested by @chdltest, you could do it by using fullPage.js.

Here's an example. Go to the last section.

Code used for the example:

Javascript

$('#fullpage').fullpage({
    sectionsColor: ['yellow', 'orange', '#C0C0C0', '#ADD8E6'],
    scrollOverflow: true,
    scrollBar: true,
    afterLoad: function (anchor, index) {

        //hiding the main scroll bar
        if (index == 4) {
            $('body, html').css('overflow', 'hidden');
        }

        //showing the main scroll bar
        if (index == 3) {
            $('body, html').css('overflow', 'visible');
        }
    }
});


CSS (in case you prefer to use the normal style for it)

/* Normal style scroll bar 
* --------------------------------------- */
 .slimScrollBar {
    display: none !important;
}
.fp-scrollable {
    overflow: auto !important;
}

Advantages of using fullPage.js instead to your own code:

  • Strongly tested in different devices and browsers. (IE, Opera, Safari, Chrome, Firefox..)
  • Prevent problems with trackpads, Apple laptops trackpads or Apple Magic Mouse.
  • Old browser's compatibility, such as IE 8, Opera 12...
  • Touch devices compatibility (IE Windows Phone, Android, Apple iOS, touch desktops...)
  • It provides many other useful options and callbacks.

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