4

I have a Spring-based application that has a background polling service runs in a separated thread to update status of data in database (EmployeeStatusPollService). I use JPA (Hibernate vendor) for the Repository. I implemented this service in two solutions, but only one solution works. Below are the two solutions.

Solution 1: Transactional method checkAndUpdateStatus in other service class and poll service calls it

@Service
public class EmployeeStatusPollService implements Runnable {

  @Inject 
  private EmployeeService employeeService;

  private static final int DEFAULT_PAGE_SIZE = 300;
  private boolean flag = true;

  public EmployeeStatusPollService() {
  }

  @PostConstruct
  public void start() {
    SimpleAsyncTaskExecutor executor = new SimpleAsyncTaskExecutor();
    executor.setConcurrencyLimit(SimpleAsyncTaskExecutor.NO_CONCURRENCY);
    executor.execute(this);
  }

  public void run() { 
    while(flag) {
      try {
        int pagenum = 1;
        List<Employee> items = null;

        do {        
          items = employeeService.checkAndUpdateStatus(pagenum, DEFAULT_PAGE_SIZE);
        } while(items != null && items.size() == DEFAULT_PAGE_SIZE);      
      } catch(Exception ex) {

      }
    }
  }
}

@Service
public class EmployeeServiceImpl implements EmployeeService {

  private static final Logger LOG = LoggerFactory.getLogger(EmployeeServiceImpl.class);

  @Inject 
  private EmployeeRepository employeeRepository;

  @Transactional
    public List<Employee> checkAndUpdateStatus(int pagenum, int pagesize) throws Exception {
    // ....
  }
}

Solution 2: Transactional method checkAndUpdateStatus is in poll service class

@Service
public class EmployeeStatusPollService implements Runnable {

  @Inject 
  private EmployeeRepository employeeRepository;

  private static final int DEFAULT_PAGE_SIZE = 300;
  private boolean flag = true;

  public EmployeeStatusPollService() {
  }

  @PostConstruct
  public void start() {
    SimpleAsyncTaskExecutor executor = new SimpleAsyncTaskExecutor();
    executor.setConcurrencyLimit(SimpleAsyncTaskExecutor.NO_CONCURRENCY);
    executor.execute(this);
  }

  public void run() { 
    while(flag) {
      try {
        int pagenum = 1;
        List<Employee> items = null;

        do {        
          items = checkAndUpdateStatus(pagenum, DEFAULT_PAGE_SIZE);
        } while(items != null && items.size() == DEFAULT_PAGE_SIZE);      
      } catch(Exception ex) {

      }
    }
  }

  @Transactional
    public List<Employee> checkAndUpdateStatus(int pagenum, int pagesize) throws Exception {
    // ....
  }
}

Details of method checkAndUpdateStatus

@Transactional
public List<Employee> checkAndUpdateStatus(int pagenum, int pagesize) throws Exception {
  PageRequest page = new PageRequest(pagenum, pagesize);
  Page<Employee> pagedItems = employeeRepository.findByStatus(EmployeeStatus.PENDING, page);  // Line 1: Query employees 
  List<Employee> emps = pagedItems.getContent();      
  List<Long> updatedItems = new ArrayList<>();
  int i = 0;

  for(Employee emp:emps) {
    try {
      // ...

      emp.setStatus(status);  // Line 2: Update employee's status
      employeeRepository.save(emp); // Line 3: Save/Update employee
      updatedItems.add(emp.getId());
      i++;

      if(i % 50 == 0) {
        employeeRepository.flush(); // Line 4: flush for every 50 employees
      }

      //....        
    } catch (Exception ex) {    
      // handle exception here....
    }
  }

  return emps;
}

Configuration

<bean id="transactionManager" class="org.springframework.orm.jpa.JpaTransactionManager">
    <property name="entityManagerFactory" ref="entityManagerFactory" />
</bean>

<tx:annotation-driven transaction-manager="transactionManager" />

<bean id="dataSource" class="org.apache.commons.dbcp2.BasicDataSource">
    <property name="driverClassName" value="${jdbc.driver}" />
    <property name="url" value="${jdbc.url}" />
    <property name="username" value="${jdbc.username}" />
    <property name="password" value="${jdbc.password}" />
    <property name="defaultAutoCommit" value="false" />
</bean>

<bean id="entityManager" class="org.springframework.orm.jpa.support.SharedEntityManagerBean">
    <property name="entityManagerFactory" ref="entityManagerFactory"/>
</bean>

<bean id="entityManagerFactory" class="org.springframework.orm.jpa.LocalContainerEntityManagerFactoryBean">
    <property name="dataSource" ref="dataSource"></property>
    <property name="jpaDialect" ref="jpaDialect"></property>
    <property name="jpaVendorAdapter" ref="jpaVendorAdapter"></property>
    <property name="packagesToScan" value="${jpa.packagesToScan}" />
    <property name="jpaProperties">
        <props>
            <prop key="hibernate.dialect">${hibernate.dialect}</prop>
            <prop key="hibernate.show_sql">${hibernate.show_sql}</prop>
            <prop key="hibernate.format_sql">${hibernate.format_sql}</prop>
            <prop key="hibernate.connection.autocommit">${hibernate.connection.autocommit}</prop>
            <prop key="hibernate.connection.defaultAutoCommit">${hibernate.connection.defaultAutoCommit}</prop>
        </props>
    </property>
</bean>

<bean id="jpaDialect" class="org.springframework.orm.jpa.vendor.HibernateJpaDialect"></bean>

<bean id="jpaVendorAdapter" class="org.springframework.orm.jpa.vendor.HibernateJpaVendorAdapter"></bean>

Solution 2 does not work and I get the error "Persistent entity is detached..." when it updates/saves the entity to the database at the Line 3 of method checkAndUpdateStatus.

IMO, Solution 2 does not work because the method checkAndUpdateStatus isn't being put in Transactional Context although it's marked by @Transactional. Even when I set REQUIRES_NEW it still doesn't work. Could anyone can explain me about this error why it happened or send me some reference documentation about this?

7

Transactional annotation works by creating a proxy on the original class, and local or internal calls to methods within a class do not cause the proxied method to be invoked. In other words, a call from a method in a class to another method in the same class does not get intercepted by the proxy.

To explain that specifically in your case:

For transactional annotation to work, spring creates a proxy around EmployeeStatusPollService class that will wrap your EmployeeStatusPollService class instance to intercept calls to checkAndUpdateStatus method that has the transactional annotation.

The proxied version of the checkAndUpdateStatus method adds the desired transactional behaviour and afterwards calls the original checkAndUpdateStatus method. This has the effect however, that any call to the checkAndUpdateStatus method from within your class instance is directly invoked on that instance and will not be intercepted by the wrapping proxy.

Therefore, in the second example, when the "checkAndUpdateStatus" is called internally from another method of the EmployeeStatusPollService, it is not called on the proxied version of the EmployeeStatusPollService that has transactional capability, but on the normal one.

The first example worked because the checkAndUpdateStatus was in a different class and therefore the external call was intercepted by the proxy.

You can read more about the fact that transactional works with the creation of proxies here: https://spring.io/blog/2012/05/23/transactions-caching-and-aop-understanding-proxy-usage-in-spring

And you can read here about how the proxying procedure works: http://docs.spring.io/spring/docs/current/spring-framework-reference/html/aop.html#aop-understanding-aop-proxies

  • 1
    Overall correct answer, but you include a couple of pointers on how the OP can make it work in a single class. – Ordous Nov 28 '14 at 8:52
  • @Ordous, I agree with you, but the problem here is that this does not seam feasible in one class when using proxying, and proxying is inevitable when using spring aop. The only alternative I can imagine is using AspectJ and configuring it with compile time weaving so that it would not create a proxy for it. However in this case the solution #1 is sufficient and the simplest way to deal with the problem. Feel free to suggest another solution if you have thought of any – Marios Nov 28 '14 at 9:25
  • Well the 2 most commonly used are: @Autowire the service into itself, or use an explicit transaction manager (You can request Spring for one and enforce the transaction propagation yourself). There's probably a question with this exact thing somewhere in SO, but I'm too sleepy to search. Anyway, you already have my +1, it's not worth creating a fuss about unless the OP needs further help. – Ordous Nov 28 '14 at 9:31
  • 1
    I had the same problem. I was calling another @Transactional Method inside the same class. While trying to access the collections, I was getting no session error. I did not understand the problem initially, so I created transaction programmatically using TransactionTemplate inside run method and solved. Now I understood from the answer why it did not work initially. – Manoj Nov 3 '17 at 5:30
  • thank you for the explication; but even when using the first solution, and I throwed explicitly a runtimeException, but the databse don't rollback, it commits the changes done befor the exception – G. Adnane Mar 22 at 20:42

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.