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My question is I have a dataframe m as below

y1 =c( rep("A",5),rep("B",5))
y2 = rep(c(1:5),2)
y3 = y2
y3[c(2,7,9)]=NA
m = data.frame(y1,y2,y3)

   y1 y2   y3
1   A  1    1
2   A  2 <NA>
3   A  3    3
4   A  4    4
5   A  5    5
6   B  1    1
7   B  2 <NA>
8   B  3    3
9   B  4 <NA>
10  B  5    5

I want to fill in the NA based on the closest non-NA value "in front of" this NA. My output should look like this:

   y1 y2   y3 y4
1   A  1    1  1
2   A  2 <NA>  1
3   A  3    3  3
4   A  4    4  4
5   A  5    5  5
6   B  1    1  1
7   B  2 <NA>  1
8   B  3    3  3
9   B  4 <NA>  3
10  B  5    5  5

Any idea about how to use dplyr to achieve this goal?

2
  • 1
    locf won't handle the heading missing values, the nomb won't handle trailling missing values... if you have a group all with missing values, what neither will work...
    – B.Mr.W.
    Nov 29, 2014 at 21:18
  • good point, but we don't yet know whether those come up in the OP's context or not. Since they say "in front of" it sounds like they don't, but only the OP can say for sure. The solution below (and linked) does work for the OP's example. A slightly clunky solution would use zoo::na.locf twice, with and without fromLast.
    – Ben Bolker
    Nov 29, 2014 at 21:21

1 Answer 1

24

This may have been answered before, but I don't know if it's been answered in a dplyr context. zoo::na.locf() is your friend:

m %>% group_by(y1) %>% mutate(y4=zoo::na.locf(y3))
3
  • ooops, took about the same length of time to answer as to search for "[r] na.locf dplyr" on SO ...
    – Ben Bolker
    Nov 29, 2014 at 21:19
  • thanks!! I never used zoo package before...that's why I never thought about that..
    – MYjx
    Nov 29, 2014 at 21:29
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    not suggesting that you should have searched (it only works if you know what to search for), but that I should have searched & marked as duplicate before I answered.
    – Ben Bolker
    Nov 29, 2014 at 21:31

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