2

I am developing game editor in C# that uses c++ lib files. I want RTTI for C++ classes in C#. Is it possible to get RTTI of C++ class in C#? If yes how?

4

You can not expose native C++ types or code directly to the .NET platform.

There are however three ways of interacting with "native" C & C++ code from .NET (in C#, VB.Net or whatever).

  1. COM
  2. P/Invoke
  3. CLI/C++

COM is probably the easiest to use from the .NET side. Just add the COM object to your .NET project as a reference and start interacting with the interfaces and classes. For more detail on interactive with COM in .NET have a read of a book like this:

.NET and COM: The Complete Interoperability Guide

http://www.amazon.com/NET-COM-Complete-Interoperability-Guide/dp/067232170X

This of course requires you to expose your game engine objects as COM objects. This is non-trivial.

The next easiest to use is P/Invoke. If your game code is packaged in a standard windows DLL with a C calling convention you can access functions in that DLL using P/Invoke. For example:

public static class UserDll
{
    [DllImport("user32.dll")]
    private static extern bool FlashWindow(IntPtr hwnd, bool bInvert);

    public static void FlashWindow(System.Windows.Forms.Form window)
    {
        FlashWindow(window.Handle, false);
    }
}

You can do a lot with P/Invoke. Even have your C/C++ code call back into C# with delegates and what not.

I've built game engine tools in the past that used P/Invoke to call out to functions exposed in a DLL. You just have to be careful about the management of native resources. Here the IDisposable interface and class finalizers become your friends. Eg:

public class Player : IDisposable
{
    private IntPtr _thePlayer;

    public Player()
    {
        _thePlayer = CreatePlayer();
    }

    ~Player()
    {
        Dispose(false);
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
    }

    private void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (disposing)
        {
           // dispose of managed objects (ie, not native resources only)
        }

        if (_thePlayer != IntPtr.Empty)
        {
            DestroyPlayer(_thePlayer);
            _thePlayer = IntPtr.Empty;
        }
    }

    [DllImport("gameengine.dll")]
    private static extern IntPtr CreatePlayer();

    [DllImport("gameengine.dll")]
    private static extern void DestroyPlayer(IntPtr player);
}

There is a downside to using P/Invoke. First it can add a significant marshalling overhead to native calls (though there are ways of speeding that up). It also requires a C API in the gameengine.dll. If your engine is C++ classes you have to provide a C API to the C++ classes. This can add a whole lot of work (or require a code generator).

I'm not going to go into any more detail on all the messy details of dealing with Marshalling managed objects/data to and from native code. Just know that it can be done and that MSDN is your friend here.

The third and probably best way of exposing native C++ code to .NET is via CLI/C++ mixed mode assemblies. CLI/C++ lets you mix native and managed code together in a single assembly fairly seamlessly.

CLI/C++ has a funny syntax but if you're a C++ programmer it is not hard to adapt. An example might be something like this:

using namespace System;

// CLI/C++ "managed" interface 
interface class IDog
{
    void Bark();
};

#pragma managed(push off)

// Native C++
class Pet
{
public:
   Pet() {}
   ~Pet() {}

   const char* GetNativeTypeName()
   {
       return typeid(Pet).name();
   }
};

#pragma managed(pop)

// CLI/C++ "managed" class
ref class Dog : IDog
{
private:
    Pet* _nativePet;

public:
    Dog()
      : _nativePet(new Pet())
    {}
    ~Dog()
    {
        delete _nativePet; 
        _nativePet = 0;
    }

    void Bark()
    {
        // Managed code talking to native code, cats & dogs living together, oh my!
        Console::WriteLine("Bow wow wow!");

        Console::WriteLine(new System::String(_nativePet->GetNativeTypeName()));
    }
};

void _tmain()
{
    Dog^ d = gcnew Dog();
    d->Bark();
}

My recommendation (having done exactly what you're trying to do) is that for anything more than moderately complex, the best solution is to try and provide a CLI/C++ API to your game engine. I learnt everything I needed to know about CLI/C++ off MSDN but I hear this book is good if you like meaty tomes.

Expert Visual C++/CLI: .NET for Visual C++ Programmers

http://www.amazon.com/Expert-Visual-CLI-Programmers-Experts/dp/1590597567

1

This article describes the process.

Runtime Type Identification(RTTI) allows the type of an object to be determined during program execution. C# includes three keywords that support runtime type identification: is, as and typeof.

You use is to determine whether an object is of the type you want:

if (myVariable is string)
{
     // do stuff
}

You use as to convert from one object to another. If no conversion exists then null is returned.

string myString = myVariable as string;
if (myString != null)
{
    // do stuff
}

You use typeof to obtain information about a type.

To obtain the run-time type of an expression, you can use the .NET Framework method GetType.

  • Thanks for your reply. But you didn't get my question. I want C++ lib file class RTTI which I am going to import in C#. – Rushikesh Talokar Apr 27 '10 at 14:01
  • @Rushi - sorry, it wasn't clear from your question. Perhaps you should include an example of what you want to achieve. – ChrisF Apr 27 '10 at 14:08

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.