3

Suppose there is a cPoint class.

class cPoint {
  int x, y, z;
};

I wanted to print all of three variables in a single statement. So, I overloaded operator << just like

   friend std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream &cout, cPoint &p);

   std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream &out, cPoint &p) {
     out << p.get_x() << " " << p.get_y() << " " << p.get_z() << std::endl;
     return out;
   }

Make sense?

My question lies in the lines of that what would happen in case of insertion operator(>>). I overloaded that as well to take the values of x, y and z into a single statement.

    friend std::istream& operator>> (std::istream &cin, Point &p);

    std::istream& operator>> (std::istream &in, Point &p) {
        int tmp;
        in >> tmp;
        p.set_x(tmp);
        in >> tmp;
        p.set_y(tmp);
        in >> tmp;
        p.set_z(tmp);
    }

Clear?

int main() {
  cout << p << endl;
  cin >> p;
}

I know that if operator<< returned void then the compiler evaluates cout << p << endl; Due to the precedence/associativity rules, it evaluates this expression as (cout << cPoint) << endl;. cout << cPoint calls our void-returning overloaded operator<< function, which returns void. Then the partially evaluated expression becomes: void << endl;, which makes no sense!

But what would happen in case of >>. Why can't I return a void for >> as like:

    void operator>> (std::istream &cin, Point &p);

Because it does not matter if cin >> p returns void or something else. There is no other operand who could use it. This is not clear.

1
  • 2
    BTW you should use (std::ostream &out, const cPoint &p) instead of (std::ostream &out, cPoint &p) - otherwise you are giving the impression that your output operator modifies its cPoint argument. – Wojtek Surowka Dec 1 '14 at 11:24
9

You can return void from stream extracting operator >>, just like you can return void from a stream inserting operator <<. And just like with the inserting one, it will prevent you from doing chaining:

cPoint p, q;
cin >> p >> q; // This would fail with return type void

... and the very common test-correctness idiom:

cPoint p;
if (cin >> p) {
}
5
  • Agree. But in my case, I am not doing any chaining for cin. Right? – Hemant Bhargava Dec 1 '14 at 11:28
  • I am doing chaining in cout statement not in cin statement. cout << p << endl; <== Chaining cin >> p; <== No chaining – Hemant Bhargava Dec 1 '14 at 11:28
  • 1
    As I said, you can return void. In your case, you're not doing any chaining, so it will work. And you're not doing any validation, which you should, and which will not work with the void. And the void will prevent anyone else from doing chaining or validation. So returning void is a Bad Idea(TM). – Angew is no longer proud of SO Dec 1 '14 at 11:42
  • Well. This is what I wanted to hear that it should work. When I changed: code friend std::istream& operator>> (std::istream &cin, Point &p); TO code friend void operator>> (std::istream &cin, Point &p); AND code void operator>> (std::istream &in, Point &p) { code int tmp; code in >> tmp; code p.set_x(tmp); code in >> tmp; code p.set_y(tmp); code in >> tmp; code p.set_z(tmp); } It did not even compile. – Hemant Bhargava Dec 1 '14 at 11:46
  • @HemantBhargava That it does not compile is information that should have been very explicitly mentioned in the question. Along with the full error message and (ideally) a minimal reproducing example as well. – Angew is no longer proud of SO Dec 1 '14 at 11:49
3

I overloaded operator << just like ...

Proper override should take the second parameter by const reference:

friend std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream &cout, const cPoint &p);
//                                                   ^^^^^

I overloaded that as well to take the values of x, y and z into a single statement.

You forgot to return in from the implementation:

std::istream& operator>> (std::istream &in, Point &p) {
    int tmp;
    in >> tmp;
    p.set_x(tmp);
    in >> tmp;
    p.set_y(tmp);
    in >> tmp;
    p.set_z(tmp);
    return in; <<== Here
}

Making it void would prevent you from reading anything else after the point on the same line.

0

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