115

Is there a way to color spans of columns all the way down. See, starting example below:

<table border="1">
  <tr>
    <th>Motor</th>
    <th colspan="3">Engine</th>
    <th>Car</th>
    <th colspan="2">Body</th>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>1</td>
    <td>2</td>
    <td>3</td>
    <td>4</td>
    <td>5</td>
    <td>6</td>
    <td>7</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>7</td>
    <td>1</td>
    <td>2</td>
    <td>3</td>
    <td>4</td>
    <td>5</td>
    <td>6</td>
  </tr>
</table>

And I am looking for a better way (less code, non-individual coloring) to color, for example, "Engine" and "Body" spans, including all the cells underneath them in #DDD

<style>
  .color {
    background-color: #DDD
  }
</style>
<table border="1">
  <tr>
    <th>Motor</th>
    <th colspan="3" class="color">Engine</th>
    <th>Car</th>
    <th colspan="2" class="color">Body</th>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>1</td>
    <td class="color">2</td>
    <td class="color">3</td>
    <td class="color">4</td>
    <td>5</td>
    <td class="color">6</td>
    <td class="color">7</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>7</td>
    <td class="color">1</td>
    <td class="color">2</td>
    <td class="color">3</td>
    <td>4</td>
    <td class="color">5</td>
    <td class="color">6</td>
  </tr>
</table>

  • 19
    @zipzit: There's nothing wrong with tables if you actually need a table - i.e. if the data is tabular in nature (like a table of products with prices). The criticism of tables is against using them as a layout tool. – sleske Dec 2 '14 at 10:28
  • 5
    Wonder how this entered Hot Network Questions – Mr. Alien Dec 2 '14 at 14:16
  • it was asked yesterday and as of right now, has 24 upvotes on Q and 43 on A, and the accepted Answer was and is still being upvoted like crazy – Dennis Dec 2 '14 at 14:43
  • 2
    people like to learn things they didn't know, be it a documented peculiarity of jQuery number parsing, or an HTML tag/concept that does neat things, they didn't know about :) – Dennis Dec 2 '14 at 15:01
  • 1
    @canon heh yes, anyways decent answer... – Mr. Alien Dec 2 '14 at 19:34
158

Yes, you can... using the <col> element:

.grey {
  background-color: rgba(128,128,128,.25);
}
.red {
  background-color: rgba(255,0,0,.25);
}
.blue {
  background-color: rgba(0,0,255,.25);
}
<table>
  <colgroup>
    <col class="grey" />
    <col class="red" span="3" />
    <col class="blue" />
  </colgroup>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>#</th>
      <th colspan="3">color 1</th>
      <th>color 2</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <th>1</th>
      <td>red</td>
      <td>red</td>
      <td>red</td>
      <td>blue</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <th>2</th>
      <td>red</td>
      <td>red</td>
      <td>red</td>      
      <td>blue</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

Note: You can use the span attribute to make the col definition apply to more than one column.
See also: <colgroup>

  • 9
    Note that you'll need <col span="3" /> for the spanning columns. – Niet the Dark Absol Dec 1 '14 at 18:11
  • It’s rather pointless to use a colgroup that contains all columns. – Jukka K. Korpela Dec 1 '14 at 18:29
  • 14
    @JukkaK.Korpela It gets parsed that way regardless of whether or not you specify it -just like <tbody>. I simply prefer to specify. – canon Dec 1 '14 at 19:03
  • 3
    In case anybody else is curious why this works, or which CSS properties can be used on columns, the pertinent sections of the CSS 2.1 spec are 17.3 and 17.5.1. – meriton Dec 3 '14 at 22:30
  • 1
    I wish I knew about it earlier!!!! – netrox Dec 4 '14 at 20:31
19

You can use the nth-child selector for that:

tr td:nth-child(2),
tr td:nth-child(3) {
  background: #ccc;
}
<table>
  <tr>
    <th colspan="2">headline 1</th>
    <th>headline 2</th>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>column 1</td>
    <td>column 2</td>
    <td>column 3</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>column 1</td>
    <td>column 2</td>
    <td>column 3</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>column 1</td>
    <td>column 2</td>
    <td>column 3</td>
  </tr>
</table>

  • 1
    Styling col themselves is way better than this (cleaner and faster). – tomasz86 May 21 '16 at 13:26
9

It is generally simplest to style cells (by column if desired), but columns can be styled, in different ways. One simple way is to wrap columns in a colgroup element and set styles on it. Example:

<style>
.x {
    background-color: #DDD
}
</style>
<table border="1">
<col>
<colgroup class=x>
  <col>
  <col>
  <col>
</colgroup>
<col>
<colgroup class=x>
  <col>
  <col>
</colgroup>
  <tr>
    <th>Motor</th>
    <th colspan="3" class="color">Engine</th>
    <th>Car</th>
    <th colspan="2" class="color">Body</th>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>1</td>
    <td class="color">2</td>
    <td class="color">3</td>
    <td class="color">4</td>
    <td>5</td>
    <td class="color">6</td>
    <td class="color">7</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>7</td>
    <td class="color">1</td>
    <td class="color">2</td>
    <td class="color">3</td>
    <td>4</td>
    <td class="color">5</td>
    <td class="color">6</td>
  </tr>
</table>

  • 1
    If the individual col elements inside the colgroups don't need to be styled individually, you can also set the span attribute on the colgroup itself - <colgroup span="2"> - instead of placing col elements inside it. – misterManSam Dec 9 '14 at 14:21
5

You can use CSS3: http://jsfiddle.net/snuggles08/bm98g8v8/

<style>
  .table td:nth-of-type(1) {
    background: red;
  }
  .table td:nth-of-type(5) {
    background: blue;
  }
  .table td:nth-of-type(3) {
    background: green;
  }
  .table td:nth-of-type(7) {
    background: lime;
  }
  .table td:nth-of-type(2) {
    background: skyblue;
  }
  .table td:nth-of-type(4) {
    background: darkred;
  }
  .table td:nth-of-type(6) {
    background: navy;
  }
</style>
Styled table:
<table border="1" class="table">
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>1</td>
      <td>2</td>
      <td>3</td>
      <td>4</td>
      <td>5</td>
      <td>6</td>
      <td>7</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>7</td>
      <td>1</td>
      <td>2</td>
      <td>3</td>
      <td>4</td>
      <td>5</td>
      <td>6</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>
<hr>Unstyled table:
<table border="1" class="table2">
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>1</td>
      <td>2</td>
      <td>3</td>
      <td>4</td>
      <td>5</td>
      <td>6</td>
      <td>7</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>7</td>
      <td>1</td>
      <td>2</td>
      <td>3</td>
      <td>4</td>
      <td>5</td>
      <td>6</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

5

The following implement's the nth-child selector and should work...

<style type="text/css">
    th:nth-child(2),
    th:nth-child(4)
    {
        background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 1.0);
    }

    td:nth-child(2), 
    td:nth-child(3),
    td:nth-child(4),
    td:nth-child(6),
    td:nth-child(7)
    {
        background-color: rgba(255, 0, 0, 0.5);
    }
</style>
  • You probably want a > between tr and td, since you went to the trouble of selecting tds only inside trs only inside tables... (mind the tablegroups.) – ANeves Dec 2 '14 at 17:32
  • Thanks for answer, this is different solution – M98 Feb 16 '16 at 6:57
  • This is an overkill. Over-specifying is bad for performance. table tr td is redundant as tds are always inside tr and table. – tomasz86 May 21 '16 at 13:29
4

My version using nth-child expressions:

Using the CSS concept of cascade rules to first coloring the cells and then to uncolor the ones i want to be transparent. The first selector selects all the cells after the first one, and the second one selects the fifth cell to be transparent.

<style type="text/css">
  /* colored */
  td:nth-child(n+2) { background-color: #ddd }
  /* uncolored */
  td:nth-child(5) { background-color: transparent }
</style>

<table border="1">
  <tr>
    <th>Motor</th>
    <th colspan="3">Engine</th>
    <th>Car</th>
    <th colspan="2">Body</th>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>1</td>
    <td>2</td>
    <td>3</td>
    <td>4</td>
    <td>5</td>
    <td>6</td>
    <td>7</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>7</td>
    <td>1</td>
    <td>2</td>
    <td>3</td>
    <td>4</td>
    <td>5</td>
    <td>6</td>
  </tr>
</table>

Check this interesting reference: http://learn.shayhowe.com/advanced-html-css/complex-selectors/

4

I would use the nth-child css pseudo-class for this:

tr td:nth-child(2), tr th:nth-child(2), tr td:nth-child(3), tr td:nth-child(4), tr th:nth-child(4), tr td:nth-child(6), tr td:nth-child(7){
    background-color: #DDD;
}

tr td:nth-child(2),
tr th:nth-child(2),
tr td:nth-child(3),
tr td:nth-child(4),
tr th:nth-child(4),
tr td:nth-child(6),
tr td:nth-child(7) {
  background-color: #DDD;
}
<table border="1">
  <tr>
    <th>Motor</th>
    <th colspan="3">Engine</th>
    <th>Car</th>
    <th colspan="2">Body</th>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>1</td>
    <td>2</td>
    <td>3</td>
    <td>4</td>
    <td>5</td>
    <td>6</td>
    <td>7</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>7</td>
    <td>1</td>
    <td>2</td>
    <td>3</td>
    <td>4</td>
    <td>5</td>
    <td>6</td>
  </tr>
</table>

0

This is an old question with a lot of great answers. Just wanted to add the -n and nth-last-child selectors that haven't yet been mentioned. They're helpful when applying CSS to multiple columns but may not know the number of columns prior to styling, or have multiple tables with varying widths.

/* Select the first two */
table tr td:nth-child(-n + 2) {
  background-color: lightblue;
}

/* Select all but the first two */
table tr td:not(:nth-child(-n + 2)) {
    background-color:lightgreen;
}

/* Select last two only */
table tr td:nth-last-child(-n + 2) {
  background-color:mistyrose;
}

/* Select all but the last two */
table tr td:not(:nth-last-child(-n + 2)) {
    background-color:yellow;
}

jsFiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/3rpf5oht/2/

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