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I have the following DataFrame (extract)

data = pd.DataFrame([[0., -10.88948939, 74.22099994, 1.5, "NW", 0], [0.819377018, -10.88948939, 74.22099994, 1.5, "NW", 1], [8.47965933, -10.88948939, 74.22099994, 1.5, "NW", 10], [15.38036833, -10.88948939, 74.22099994, 1.5, "NW", 20]], columns=["Velocity", "X", "Y", "Z", "wind_direction", "wind_speed"])

Velocity  X      Y     Z  wind_direction wind_speed
0        -10.88 74.22 1.5 NW             0
0.82     -10.89 74.22 1.5 NW             1
8.48     -10.89 74.22 1.5 NW             10
15.38    -10.89 74.22 1.5 NW             20

It represents the results of a CFD simulation for a specific coordinate (X, Y, Z) and two boundary conditions (wind_direction and wind_speed).

I would like to estimate Velocity for the same point (X, Y, Z), same wind_direction, but intermediate wind_speed, say 4.6. I have this additional row in my dataframe

NaN -10.89 74.22 1.5 NW 4.6

Now I would like to interpolate to fill the NaN based on the wind_speed. For the example above I would expect to get 6.643773541

The number comes from the linear interpolation:

0.82 + (4.6 - 1)/(10 - 1) * (8.48 - 0.82)

Any idea? Thanks

UPDATE

I have found a solution to the issue above. The trick is to use groupby and define a function that interpolates over the dataframe that is created by groupby and passed to apply(). In my case, this is the function

def interp(x, wind_speed):
    g = interpolate.interp1d(np.array(x["wind_speed"]), np.array(x["Velocity"]))
    return g(wind_speed)

and this is my groupby

group = df.groupby("point").apply(interp, wind_speed)

The function interp has to be called with a parameter that represents the point where to perform the interpolation.

I wonder whether there is a better way to do it.

2
  • 3
    The idea is to use set_index to put the values you want to interpolate at in the index. Something like data.set_index('wind_speed')['Velocity'].interpolate(method='index'). interpolate doesn't have a levels argument. Not sure if you need one here. Dec 1 '14 at 19:47
  • 1
    Thanks. This is only one of the points in the data frame and each one of them as the same 4 wind speeds that I use for the simulation. So the indexes would not be unique. The typical full dataframe will have the same set of points repeated for each wind direction and for each wind speed that I test
    – Rojj
    Dec 1 '14 at 19:59
4

My solution is to index "wind_speed" by:

df.set_index('wind_speed', inplace=True)

Then I interpolate by the index column

df.interpolate(method='index', inplace=True)

Now I can return the previous state

df.reset_index(inplace=True)

let me know if it went well...

2
  • 1
    This is a simpler solution, except 'inplace=True'. It makes df as 'None' and produces 'AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'interpolate' eventually. I skip 'inplace' and produce correct answer.
    – Brom
    Feb 20 '20 at 9:47
  • inplace=True make the command return None but df will have the result applied.
    – DomingoR
    Dec 22 '20 at 9:57
1

I have found a solution to the issue above. The trick is to use groupby and define a function that interpolates over the dataframe that is created by groupby and passed to apply(). In my case, this is the function

def interp(x, wind_speed):
    g = interpolate.interp1d(np.array(x["wind_speed"]), np.array(x["Velocity"]))
    return g(wind_speed)

and this is my groupby

group = df.groupby("point").apply(interp, wind_speed)

The function interp has to be called with a parameter that represents the point where to perform the interpolation.

I wonder whether there is a better way to do it.

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