I wrote a DLL that initializes an OpenGL context using glew. Firstly I created a dummy window to create the appropriate context. Secondly, the final context and window are created. glewInit() function call succeeded and some boolean variable such as GLEW_ARB_texture_storage are set to 1 (I have a video adapter compatible with opengl 3.3).

Note that

glewExperimental=GL_TRUE 

though.

However, when I'm writing the client program using the DLL above, the same GLEW_ARB_texture_storage variable equals GL_FALSE.

Therefore, I'm wondering where glewInit() should be finally called ? It seems that calling it from the DLL is not enough. Should I also call it from the client program side ?

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I actually would not make a point of initializing GLEW from your dummy context. Consider manually loading the one or two extensions you need to create your final context by hand (e.g. WGL_ARB_create_context and WGL_ARB_pixel_format). You are not guaranteed to get the same ICD implementation on Windows when you create two different contexts. That is why GLEW MX was created.

Now, what I suspect is happening in your case is not actually that you are getting two different ICDs (that is extremely rare in the real-world), but actually that the first context you create is a compatibility profile and the second is a core profile.

GLEW initializes the variables such as GLEW_ARB_texture_storage using the extensions string, but in a core profile GLEW is not smart enough to parse that string the right way (multiple calls to glGetStringi (...)). This is why you have to use GLEW_EXPERIMENTAL.

GLEW_EXPERIMNETAL tells GLEW to try and load every function pointer for every extension it knows about without first parsing any extension string to check availability. That is a necessary evil in core profiles, but not in compatibility (because the old extension string mechanism is still valid in compatibility). Any part of GLEW that relies on parsing the extension string is not going to work correctly in a core profile.

  • Ok. Does it also explain why glGetString(GL_EXTENSIONS) returns a valid string when the dummy context is created and a NULL pointer when the final context is created ? – Zyend Dec 2 '14 at 6:31
  • @Zyend: Yes, not only that. But it's also generating GL_INVALID_ENUM when you call it in the final context. Check glGetError (...) before and after calling it. – Andon M. Coleman Dec 2 '14 at 8:26
  • You're right Andon, the first created context is a compatibility profile and the second a core profile. Setting GLEW_EXPERIMENTAL to GL_TRUE fixes the issue in my library side. However, in the client side program, I was unable to test GLEW_ARB_texture_storage for example. Whereas this variable = GL_TRUE in the DLL side. I changed my DLL into a static lib...and there it worked. – Zyend Dec 2 '14 at 8:55
  • However, how is it possible that GLEW_EXT_direct_state_access equals FALSE although GL_EXT_direct_state_access is found in glGetString(GL_EXTENSIONS) ? – Zyend Dec 2 '14 at 19:41

I wrote a DLL that initializes an OpenGL context using glew

That's not what GLEW does. GLEW does not initialize OpenGL contexts, GLEW loads OpenGL extension function addresses and initializes function pointers with them. You must call GLEW with an pre-existing OpenGL context being created and made current in the thread calling glewInit().

Your program creates an OpenGL context somewhere and after that calls glewInit() apparently. And from the way you describe it, your DLL probably just calls glewInit() through the DllMain entry function, which gets called when the DLL is loaded, which is usually before when the processes WinMain or / main function are called, so a OpenGL context has not been created. You can create a OpenGL context in your DLL of course, but you have to ask yourself, if that makes sense to the user of the DLL.

  • Hello. In my DLL, I have of course created a respective window and a valid opengl context before calling glewInit(). – Zyend Dec 2 '14 at 6:27

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