1

I have a NLP task and I'm using scikit-learn. Reading the tutorials i found have to vectorize text and how to use this vectorization models to feed a classification algorithm. Assume that i have some text and i would like to vectorize it as follows:

from sklearn.feature_extraction.text import CountVectorizer

corpus =['''Computer science is the scientific and
practical approach to computation and its applications.'''
#this is another opinion
'''It is the systematic study of the feasibility, structure,
expression, and mechanization of the methodical
procedures that underlie the acquisition,
representation, processing, storage, communication of,
and access to information, whether such information is encoded
as bits in a computer memory or transcribed in genes and
protein structures in a biological cell.'''
         #anotherone
'''A computer scientist specializes in the theory of
computation and the design of computational systems''']

vectorizer = CountVectorizer(analyzer='word')

X = vectorizer.fit_transform(corpus)

print X

The problem is that i dont understand the meaning of the output, i dont see any relation with the text and the matrix that is returned by the vectorizer:

  (0, 12)   3
  (0, 33)   1
  (0, 20)   3
  (0, 45)   7
  (0, 34)   1
  (0, 2)    6
  (0, 28)   1
  (0, 4)    1
  (0, 47)   2
  (0, 10)   2
  (0, 22)   1
  (0, 3)    1
  (0, 21)   1
  (0, 42)   1
  (0, 40)   1
  (0, 26)   5
  (0, 16)   1
  (0, 38)   1
  (0, 15)   1
  (0, 23)   1
  (0, 25)   1
  (0, 29)   1
  (0, 44)   1
  (0, 49)   1
  (0, 1)    1
  : :
  (0, 30)   1
  (0, 37)   1
  (0, 9)    1
  (0, 0)    1
  (0, 19)   2
  (0, 50)   1
  (0, 41)   1
  (0, 14)   1
  (0, 5)    1
  (0, 7)    1
  (0, 18)   4
  (0, 24)   1
  (0, 27)   1
  (0, 48)   1
  (0, 17)   1
  (0, 31)   1
  (0, 39)   1
  (0, 6)    1
  (0, 8)    1
  (0, 35)   1
  (0, 36)   1
  (0, 46)   1
  (0, 13)   1
  (0, 11)   1
  (0, 43)   1

Also i dont understand what's happening with the output when i use the toarray() method:

print X.toarray()

What exactly means the output and what relation has with the corpus?:

[[1 1 6 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 4 2 3 1 1 1 1 1 5 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
  1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 1 2 1 1 1]]
1

2 Answers 2

5

The CountVectorizer produces the document-term matrix. For a simple example, let's take a look of the following simplified code:

from sklearn.feature_extraction.text import CountVectorizer

corpus =['''computer hardware''',
'''computer data and software data''']

vectorizer = CountVectorizer(analyzer='word')

X = vectorizer.fit_transform(corpus)

print X

print X.toarray()

You have two documents, the elements of corpus, and five terms, the words. And you can count the terms in documents as follows:

      | and computer data hardware software
      +-------------------------------------
doc 0 |            1             1 
doc 1 |   1        1    2                 1 

And the X represents the above matrix in an associative manner, i.e. a map from (row, col) to the frequency of terms and the X.toarray() shows X as a list of list. The following is the execution result:

  (1, 0)    1
  (0, 1)    1
  (1, 1)    1
  (1, 2)    2
  (0, 3)    1
  (1, 4)    1
[[0 1 0 1 0]
 [1 1 2 0 1]]

As noted by @dmcc, you omitted the comma which makes the corpus have only one document.

2
  • Thanks for the feedback. What about the other vectorizers that scikit-learn has? (e.g. FeatureHasher, Tf–idf, etc), does this vectorization algorithms return a document-matrix or the returned matrix depend on the selected vectorization algorithm?.
    – tumbleweed
    Dec 3, 2014 at 5:44
  • 1
    @ml_guy Yes, it depends on vectorizers and parameters. Please take a look of the feature extraction page.
    – Simon Woo
    Dec 3, 2014 at 23:53
3

I think the missing link is vectorizer.get_feature_names() (docs). This method lets you map the counts in the matrix back to their original words:

>>> vectorizer.get_feature_names()
[u'access', u'acquisition', u'and', u'applications', u'approach', u'as', u'biological', u'bits', u'cell', u'communication', u'computation', u'computational', u'computer', u'design', u'encoded', u'expression', u'feasibility', u'genes', u'in', u'information', u'is', u'it', u'its', u'mechanization', u'memory', u'methodical', u'of', u'or', u'practical', u'procedures', u'processing', u'protein', u'representation', u'science', u'scientific', u'scientist', u'specializes', u'storage', u'structure', u'structures', u'study', u'such', u'systematic', u'systems', u'that', u'the', u'theory', u'to', u'transcribed', u'underlie', u'whether']

Thus, the first element in X.toarray() means that the corpus contained 1 instance of the word access and the third element means there were 6 instances of the word and.

By the way, one point of confusion might be a missing comma around #anotherone -- this results in the two strings being concatenated so that corpus is just a list with one string in it now.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.