34

I'm currently writing a script that should map a network drive to the letter Z , i'm using the command net use z: \\path , the thing is that if the user is already using this letter i won't be able to map it, is there any way to check the existense of this drive (z) and if it exists to unmount it and mount it to a different letter and still use the z drive which i need for my script, this is a part of an installation, and it should be on Z drive.

2
  • Start with for /F "tokens=1,2*" %G in ('net use^|Find "\\"^|Find /I "Z:"') do @echo %H %I to see an example. (Using that in a batch script, double the % sign, use %%G, %%H etc.) Learn more .... Then you could replace that simple @echo %%H %%I with multiple commands in FOR loop. Feel free to update your question with actual achievements and ask more in case you crane at something.
    – JosefZ
    Dec 2 '14 at 10:38
  • 1
    Why not just use the next available drive letter intead of destroying the users current drive mapping: net use * \\path. or you can use the PUSHD command which will map the next available drive letter and immediately do a change directory to that path: PUSHD \\path
    – Squashman
    Oct 19 '15 at 16:58
51

You can check whether the drive is mounted by IF EXIST Z:\. This should work:

if exist z:\ (
    net use z: /delete
)
net use z: \\path
3
  • 16
    Also useful: if not exist z:\ (net use z: \\my\unc\path)
    – Jeroen
    Nov 11 '15 at 8:12
  • 2
    This only answers part of the question and does not answer the full question of re-mapping the drive to a different letter.
    – jaylweb
    Nov 15 '16 at 14:32
  • 1
    Note; If you have a disconnected (but still remembered) mapped drive, it doesn't show up when accessed this way. I haven't found a workaround / ended up just removing the if condition and deleting the mapped drive regardless of whether or not one existed)
    – JohnLBevan
    May 4 '20 at 14:46
5

I use the following scriptbit to unmap all drives:

:: First unmap all network drives
FOR /F "tokens=1,2,3" %%G IN ('net use^| Find "\\"') DO (
  ECHO.Unmapping %%I from drive letter %%H
  NET USE %%H /D > NUL
)

What does it do? Let's split this up

FOR /F "tokens=1,2,3" %%G IN () DO ()--> will iterate over the set defined between () and the first, second and third word (any whitespace is used as separator) will become available as %%G, %%H and %%I respectively.

('...') will run a command ... and pass the result(s) to the FOR loop

net use will output something like this:

New connections will be remembered.


Status       Local     Remote                    Network

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OK           M:        \\diskstation\music       Microsoft Windows Network
OK           P:        \\diskstation\home        Microsoft Windows Network
OK           V:        \\diskstation\video       Microsoft Windows Network
OK           X:        \\diskstation\photo       Microsoft Windows Network
The command completed successfully.

This output is then piped to Find.exe (the windows equivalent to grep) which looks for "\\".

The pipe symbol | is escaped using ^ so cmd does not execute it directly. The output will then be:

OK           M:        \\diskstation\music       Microsoft Windows Network
OK           P:        \\diskstation\home        Microsoft Windows Network
OK           V:        \\diskstation\video       Microsoft Windows Network
OK           X:        \\diskstation\photo       Microsoft Windows Network

NET USE /D will delete the drive mapping for the selected mapping

2
  • 1
    First, this does nothing to answer the posters question. Second, this breaks if the remote UNC path is long and causes the network column to display on a second line. This script is overkill for deleting all drive mappings. A simpler way to remove all drive mappings is to use net use * /d /y.
    – jaylweb
    Nov 15 '16 at 13:49
  • Third, it'll break, if Status is not OK and consists of multiple words e. g. Not available. Then tokens will catch the wrong parts. Mar 3 at 13:17
4

Another possible way could be:

net use Z:
if %errorlevel% EQU 0 net use Z: /delete
net use Z: \\path
1
  • I like this because you can use it with just a share too, e.g. net use \\some\share
    – dmarlow
    Jan 7 '19 at 19:14
2

My requirements were slightly different than the OP's: I needed to map a network drive, always to the same path, but only if it didn't exist already

if not exist z:\ (
    net use z: \\ComputerName\ShareName
)
1
  • 2
    z: may be in Disconnected or Unavailable state, in this case remapping may fail.
    – user1602
    Jul 10 '20 at 5:46
1

To answer the original question, you can check if Z is already mapped and then re-map it to a different drive letter (e.g. y:), then map z to the new path.

if exist z:\ (
    for /F "tokens=1,2*" %%G in ('net use^|Find "\\"^|Find /I "z:"')  do ( net use y: %%H )
    net use z: /delete
)
net use z: \\path
1
  • As already commented below similar answers, `if exist z:` does not check if a drive letter is just mapped. Instead, it returns true if a drive letter is mapped AND if the destination is available. So with your solution, you cannot delete a mapped drive, that is currently unavailable. Mar 3 at 7:26
1

In batch you can write code like this:

@echo off
net use V: >nul 2>&1
if %errorlevel% equ 0 goto unmap

if exist V:\ does not work on Windows 10, also net use displays additional information, I have now suppressed it using >nul 2>&1.

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