1

Thanks to those who helped me figure out I needed to use threading to run a loop in a control script I have run, I now have an issue to try and control the thread - by starting or stopping it based on a function: I want to start a process to get a motor to cycle through a movement based on a 'start' parameter sent to the controlling function, also I want to send a 'stop' parameter to stop the thread too - here's where I got to:

def looper():
     while True:
            print 'forward loop'
            bck.ChangeDutyCycle(10)
            fwd.ChangeDutyCycle(0)
            time.sleep(5)
            print 'backwards loop'
            bck.ChangeDutyCycle(0)
            fwd.ChangeDutyCycle(20)
            time.sleep(5)


def looper_control(state):
    t = threading.Thread(target=looper)
    if state == 'start':
       t.start()
    elif state == 'stop':
       t.join()
       print 'looper stopped!!'

This starts the thread okay when I call looper_control('start') but throws an error when looper_control('stop'):

  File "/usr/lib/python2.7/threading.py", line 657, in join
    raise RuntimeError("cannot join thread before it is started")
RuntimeError: cannot join thread before it is started

EDIT: looper_control called from here

  if "motor" in tmp:
       if tmp[-1:] == '0':
          #stop both pin
          MotorControl('fwd',0,0)
          print 'stop motors'
          looper_control('stop')
       elif tmp[-1:] == '2':
          #loop the motor
          print 'loop motors'
          looper_control('start')

UPDATE: Ive not been able to stop the thread using the method suggested - I thought I had it!

here's where I am:

class sliderControl(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self,stop_event):
            super(sliderControl,self).__init__()
            self.stop_event = stop_event

    def run(self):
            while   self.stop_event:
                    print 'forward loop'
                    bck.ChangeDutyCycle(10)
                    fwd.ChangeDutyCycle(0)
                    time.sleep(5)
                    print 'backwards loop'
                    bck.ChangeDutyCycle(0)
                    fwd.ChangeDutyCycle(20)
                    time.sleep(5)


def looper_control(state,stop_event):
   if state == 'start':
       t = sliderControl(stop_event=stop_event)
       t.start()
   elif state == 'stop':
       #time.sleep(3)
       stop_event.set()
       #t.join()          
       print 'looper stopped!!'

called via:

   if tmp[-1:] == '0':
          #stop both pin
          MotorControl('fwd',0,0)
          print 'stop motors'
          #stop_thread_event = threading.Event()
          print 'stopping thread'
          print  stop_thread_event
          looper_control('stop',stop_thread_event)
       elif tmp[-1:] == '2':
          #loop the motor
          print 'loop motors'
          global stop_thread_event
          stop_thread_event = threading.Event()
          print stop_thread_event
          looper_control('start', stop_thread_event)

It looked like a separate thread event was being called by loop and stop, so I thought a global would sort it out but its just not playing ball. When I start the loop - it runs, but when I try to stop it, I get looper stopped!! , but the process just keeps running

  • 1
    Please show us the code that calls looper_control('stop'). – Kevin Dec 2 '14 at 17:03
  • Where does state come from, though? (who or what sets it to start or stop?) It seems like a fairly straightforward signal (effbot.org/zone/thread-synchronization.htm#events) but it's difficult for me to write code without that piece of information. – BorrajaX Dec 2 '14 at 17:06
2

Your top-level thread routine will need to become an event handler that listens to a Queue object (as in from Queue import Queue) for messages, then handles them based on state. One of those messages can be a shutdown command, in which case the worker thread function simply exits, allowing the main thread to join it.

Instead of time.sleep, use threading.Timer with the body of the timer sending a message into your event queue.

This is a substantial refactoring. But especially if you plan on adding more conditions, you'll need it. One alternative is to use a package that handles this kind of thing for you, maybe pykka.

| improve this answer | |
1

To stop a python thread you can use threading.Event()

try this:

class YourClass(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, stop_event):
        super(YourClass, self).__init__()
        self.stop_event = stop_event

    def run(self):
        while not self.stop_event.is_set():
            # do what you need here (what you had in looper)

def looper_control(state, stop_event):
    if state == 'start':
        t = YourClass(stop_event=stop_event)
        t.start()
    elif state == 'stop':
        stop_event.set()

and call to looper_control:

stop_thread_event = threading.Event()
looper_control(state, stop_thread_event)
| improve this answer | |
  • This looks promising, but it got an error: looper_control('start',stop_thread_event) File "visca_midi_t4.py", line 40, in looper_control t = threading.Thread(target=looper, stop_event=stop_event) TypeError: __init__() got an unexpected keyword argument 'stop_event' – Nowski Dec 2 '14 at 17:34
  • Still battling this, when set t inside looper_control I get an error: t = threading.Thread(target=looper, stop_event=stop_event) TypeError: __init__() got an unexpected keyword argument 'stop_event' I gues this means that its getting stop_event but not expecting it? – Nowski Dec 3 '14 at 11:07
  • but when I put change to def looper(stop_event) I get t = threading.Thread(target=looper, stop_event=stop_event) TypeError: __init__() got an unexpected keyword argument 'stop_event' – Nowski Dec 3 '14 at 11:48
  • sure, threading.Thread do not know stop_event. you should create new class that inherited treading: class YourClass(threading.Thread). the init should be inside this class (dont forget to call super(YourClass, self).__init__() )... then you can call t = YourClass(target=looper, stop_event=stop_event). – Eyal Ch Dec 3 '14 at 12:50
  • so essentially I wrap it in a class, and create an init function too? What that should look like – Nowski Dec 3 '14 at 13:33
0

you only can "start" once a thread but you can lock and unlock the thread. the best way to stop and start a thread is with mutex, Example:

#!/usr/bin/python

import threading
from time import sleep
mutex2 = threading.Lock()

#This thread add values to d[]
class Hilo(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)

    def run(self):
        while True:
            mutex2.acquire()
            #Add values to d[]
            d.append("hi from Peru")
            mutex2.release()
            sleep(1)

d=[];
hilos = [Hilo()]

#Stop Thread
#If you have more threads you need make a mutex for every thread
mutex2.acquire()

#Start treades, but the thread is lock
for h in hilos:
    h.start()
#so you need do
#unlock THREAD<
mutex2.release()
#>START THREAD

#Sleep for 4 seconds
sleep(4)
#And print d[]
print d
print "------------------------------------------"
#WAIT 5 SECONDS AND STOP THE THREAD
sleep(5)
try:
    mutex2.acquire()
except Exception, e:
    mutex2.release()
    mutex2.acquire()
#AND PRINT d[]
print d
#AND NOW YOUR TRHEAD IS STOP#

#When the thread is lock(stop), you only need call: mutex2.release()  for unlock(start)
#When your thread is unlock(start) and you want lock(stop):
#try:
#    mutex2.acquire()
#except Exception, e:
#    mutex2.release()
#    mutex2.acquire()
| improve this answer | |
  • not sure I follow the stop part of that process, does release() both start and stop? I have updated my example above too, which may provide more information to explain my situation, – Nowski Dec 5 '14 at 19:04
  • I have updated my example too n.n, so copy the code an proof, and sorry for my bad english – Jordi Tanta Diaz Dec 6 '14 at 19:23
  • and remember never use a semaphore for stop or lock a thread, that is a bad practice. – Jordi Tanta Diaz Dec 6 '14 at 19:25

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