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I have to loop through std::map and the job that has to be done within each iteration has the following properties:

  1. The amount of work varies within each iteration;
  2. Does not need any synchronization between threads.

Looks like perfect scenario for dynamic scheduling, doesn't it?

However, non-random access iterators (such as std::map has) are notorious of troubling one as far as loop parallelization with OpenMP is concerned. For me the performance of this particular code is going to be critical, therefore in search for the most efficient solution I've created the following benchmark:

#include <omp.h>

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <vector>

#define COUNT 0x00006FFF

#define UNUSED(variable) (void)(variable)

using std::map;
using std::vector;

void test1(map<int, vector<int> >& m) {
  double time = omp_get_wtime();

  map<int, vector<int> >::iterator iterator = m.begin();

#pragma omp parallel
#pragma omp for schedule(dynamic, 1) nowait
  for (size_t i = 0; i < m.size(); ++i) {
    vector<int>* v;
#pragma omp critical
    v = &iterator->second;

    for (size_t j = 0; j < v->size(); ++j) {
      (*v)[j] = j;
    }

#pragma omp critical
    iterator++;
  }

  printf("Test #1: %f s\n", (omp_get_wtime() - time));
}

void test2(map<int, vector<int> >& m) {
  double time = omp_get_wtime();

#pragma omp parallel
  {
    for (map<int, vector<int> >::iterator i = m.begin(); i != m.end(); ++i) {
#pragma omp single nowait
      {
        vector<int>& v = i->second;

        for (size_t j = 0; j < v.size(); ++j) {
          v[j] = j;
        }
      }
    }
  }

  printf("Test #2: %f s\n", (omp_get_wtime() - time));
}

void test3(map<int, vector<int> >& m) {
  double time = omp_get_wtime();

#pragma omp parallel
  {
    int thread_count = omp_get_num_threads();
    int thread_num = omp_get_thread_num();
    size_t chunk_size = m.size() / thread_count;
    map<int, vector<int> >::iterator begin = m.begin();
    std::advance(begin, thread_num * chunk_size);
    map<int, vector<int> >::iterator end = begin;
    if (thread_num == thread_count - 1)
      end = m.end();
    else
      std::advance(end, chunk_size);

    for (map<int, vector<int> >::iterator i = begin; i != end; ++i) {
      vector<int>& v = i->second;

      for (size_t j = 0; j < v.size(); ++j) {
        v[j] = j;
      }
    }
  }

  printf("Test #3: %f s\n", (omp_get_wtime() - time));
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  UNUSED(argc);
  UNUSED(argv);

  map<int, vector<int> > m;

  for (int i = 0; i < COUNT; ++i) {
    m[i] = vector<int>(i);
  }

  test1(m);
  test2(m);
  test3(m);
}

There are 3 possible variants that I could come up with to imitate my task. The code is very simple and speaks for itself, please take a look at it. I've ran the tests several times and here are my results:

Test #1: 0.169000 s
Test #2: 0.203000 s
Test #3: 0.194000 s

Test #1: 0.167000 s
Test #2: 0.203000 s
Test #3: 0.191000 s

Test #1: 0.182000 s
Test #2: 0.202000 s
Test #3: 0.197000 s

Test #1: 0.167000 s
Test #2: 0.187000 s
Test #3: 0.211000 s

Test #1: 0.168000 s
Test #2: 0.195000 s
Test #3: 0.192000 s

Test #1: 0.166000 s
Test #2: 0.197000 s
Test #3: 0.199000 s

Test #1: 0.184000 s
Test #2: 0.198000 s
Test #3: 0.199000 s

Test #1: 0.167000 s
Test #2: 0.202000 s
Test #3: 0.207000 s

I'm posting this question because I found these results peculiar and absolutely unexpected:

  1. Expected test #2 to be the fastest as it does not use critical section as test #1 does;
  2. Expected test #3 to be the slowest as it does not really utilize dynamic scheduling, but rather relies on static distribution of jobs (which is done manually);
  3. Could have never expected that test #2 would be roughly equivalent to test #3 and sometimes even worse.

The questions are:

  1. Am I missing anything?
  2. Could you explain the test results?
  3. Do you have a better idea of parallelization here?

closed as off-topic by Flexo Dec 3 '14 at 10:12

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – Flexo
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Have you tried benchmarking with unordered_map? – Leeor Dec 2 '14 at 18:33
  • @Leeor, why would I? It changes nothing in this case. This question is not about data structure holy war. It is about parallelization strategies. Finally, I'm not interested in unordered_map for this particular task. – Alexander Shukaev Dec 2 '14 at 18:38
2
  1. Do you have a better idea of parallelization here?

You might try imitating schedule(static,1) of an OpenMP loop, i.e. instead of processing a big chunk of successive iterations, a thread processes iterations with thread_count stride. Here is the code:

void test4(map<int, vector<int> >& m) {
  double time = omp_get_wtime();

#pragma omp parallel
  {
    int thread_count = omp_get_num_threads();
    int thread_num = omp_get_thread_num();
    size_t map_size = m.size();
    map<int, vector<int> >::iterator it = m.begin();
    std::advance(it, thread_num);

    for (int i = thread_num; i < map_size; i+=thread_count) {
      vector<int>& v = it->second;

      for (size_t j = 0; j < v.size(); ++j) {
        v[j] = j;
      }

      if( i+thread_count < map_size ) std::advance(it, thread_count);
    }
  }

  printf("Test #4: %f s\n", (omp_get_wtime() - time));
}

schedule(static,1) provides better load balancing than schedule(static) in case the amount of work is increasing or decreasing over the iteration space. This is the case for your test workload. And in case the amount of work per iteration is random, these two strategies should on average give the same balancing.

Another variant is to imitate schedule(dynamic) with the help of an atomic counter. The code:

void test5(map<int, vector<int> >& m) {
  double time = omp_get_wtime();
  int count = 0;
#pragma omp parallel shared(count)
  {
    int i;
    int i_old = 0;
    size_t map_size = m.size();
    map<int, vector<int> >::iterator it = m.begin();

#pragma omp atomic capture
    i = count++;

    while (i < map_size) {
      std::advance(it, i-i_old);
      vector<int>& v = it->second;

      for (size_t j = 0; j < v.size(); ++j) {
        v[j] = j;
      }

      i_old = i;
#pragma omp atomic capture
      i = count++;
    }
  }

  printf("Test #5: %f s\n", (omp_get_wtime() - time));
}

in a loop, a thread decides how much it should advance its local iterator over the map. The thread first atomically increments the counter and takes its previous value, thus obtaining the iteration index, then advances the iterator by the difference between the new index and the previous one. The loop repeats until the counter is increased above the map size.

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