30

I have an array like:

var names: String = [ "Peter", "Steve", "Max", "Sandra", "Roman", "Julia" ]

I would like to get 3 random elements from that array. I'm coming from C# but in swift I'm unsure where to start. I think I should shuffle the array first and then pick the first 3 items from it for example?

I tried to shuffle it with the following extension:

extension Array
{
    mutating func shuffle()
    {
        for _ in 0..<10
        {
            sort { (_,_) in arc4random() < arc4random() }
        }
    }
}

but it then says "'()' is not convertible to '[Int]'" at the location of "shuffle()".

For picking a number of elements I use:

var randomPicks = names[0..<4];

which looks good so far.

How to shuffle? Or does anyone have a better/more elegant solution for this?

4
  • 5
    See stackoverflow.com/questions/24026510/… for a better shuffle method.
    – Martin R
    Dec 2, 2014 at 21:33
  • 1
    Thanks, I used the mutating extension method of the accepted anaswer now for shuffling.
    – Patric
    Dec 3, 2014 at 8:29
  • 2
    Yes, there are better/more elegant solutions: a full shuffling is not optimal as if you need 4 random elements out of 10, picking those one by one only costs 4 arc4random_uniform, but full shuffling costs 9 arc4random_uniform.
    – Cœur
    Jul 10, 2017 at 7:45
  • Using sort to shuffle like that just doesn't work. Sorting intentionally does as little comparison as possible, and certainly not enough to achieve a decent shuffle.
    – Alexander
    Jul 11, 2017 at 1:50

6 Answers 6

66

Xcode 11 • Swift 5.1

extension Collection {
    func choose(_ n: Int) -> ArraySlice<Element> { shuffled().prefix(n) }
}

Playground testing

var alphabet = ["A","B","C","D","E","F","G","H","I","J","K","L","M","N","O","P","Q","R","S","T","U","V","W","X","Y","Z"]
let shuffledAlphabet = alphabet.shuffled()  // "O", "X", "L", "D", "N", "K", "R", "E", "S", "Z", "I", "T", "H", "C", "U", "B", "W", "M", "Q", "Y", "V", "A", "G", "P", "F", "J"]
let letter = alphabet.randomElement()  // "D"
var numbers = Array(0...9)
let shuffledNumbers = numbers.shuffled()
shuffledNumbers                              // [8, 9, 3, 6, 0, 1, 4, 2, 5, 7]
numbers            // [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
numbers.shuffle() // mutate it  [6, 0, 2, 3, 9, 1, 5, 7, 4, 8]
numbers            // [6, 0, 2, 3, 9, 1, 5, 7, 4, 8]
let pick3numbers = numbers.choose(3)  // [8, 9, 2]

extension RangeReplaceableCollection {
    /// Returns a new Collection shuffled
    var shuffled: Self { .init(shuffled()) }
    /// Shuffles this Collection in place
    @discardableResult
    mutating func shuffledInPlace() -> Self  {
        self = shuffled
        return self
    }
    func choose(_ n: Int) -> SubSequence { shuffled.prefix(n) }
}

var alphabetString = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"
let shuffledAlphabetString = alphabetString.shuffled  // "DRGXNSJLFQHPUZTBKVMYAWEICO"
let character = alphabetString.randomElement()  // "K"
alphabetString.shuffledInPlace() // mutate it  "WYQVBLGZKPFUJTHOXERADMCINS"
alphabetString            // "WYQVBLGZKPFUJTHOXERADMCINS"
let pick3Characters = alphabetString.choose(3)  // "VYA"
7
  • When I try to use the indexRandom() method, it raises the compilation error saying find() is unavailable. Let me know in if this is any custom method you forgot to mention... I am using Xcode 7.
    – DShah
    Sep 25, 2015 at 11:43
  • Thanks for the prompt response... But I think you removed the Int extension due to which indexRandom() method will give error.
    – DShah
    Sep 25, 2015 at 12:27
  • 1
    Nice! I have to give it to you, you come up with some really good extensions. Apr 28, 2019 at 3:23
  • Hi, does using this extension choose randomly from the Array. For example, I have an array of over 40+ heart rate reading that I want to make into only 40, but I don't want them to be out of order, so I can plot them in a graph, Can I use var fortyReadings = heartratereading.choose(40) to get 40 values in the order they were in? Or what is a way I can do that? Thanks in advance ~ Kurt
    – Kurt L.
    Nov 15, 2019 at 8:45
  • I am not sure if I understood your question but looks like you just need to shuffle your elements once and them group the random by n (40) elements stackoverflow.com/a/48089097/2303865
    – Leo Dabus
    Nov 17, 2019 at 5:55
25

Or does anyone have a better/more elegant solution for this?

I do. Algorithmically better than the accepted answer, which does count-1 arc4random_uniform operations for a full shuffle, we can simply pick n values in n arc4random_uniform operations.

And actually, I got two ways of doing better than the accepted answer:

Better solution

extension Array {
    /// Picks `n` random elements (straightforward approach)
    subscript (randomPick n: Int) -> [Element] {
        var indices = [Int](0..<count)
        var randoms = [Int]()
        for _ in 0..<n {
            randoms.append(indices.remove(at: Int(arc4random_uniform(UInt32(indices.count)))))
        }
        return randoms.map { self[$0] }
    }
}

Best solution

The following solution is twice faster than previous one.

for Swift 3.0 and 3.1

extension Array {
    /// Picks `n` random elements (partial Fisher-Yates shuffle approach)
    subscript (randomPick n: Int) -> [Element] {
        var copy = self
        for i in stride(from: count - 1, to: count - n - 1, by: -1) {
            let j = Int(arc4random_uniform(UInt32(i + 1)))
            if j != i {
                swap(&copy[i], &copy[j])
            }
        }
        return Array(copy.suffix(n))
    }
}

for Swift 3.2 and 4.x

extension Array {
    /// Picks `n` random elements (partial Fisher-Yates shuffle approach)
    subscript (randomPick n: Int) -> [Element] {
        var copy = self
        for i in stride(from: count - 1, to: count - n - 1, by: -1) {
            copy.swapAt(i, Int(arc4random_uniform(UInt32(i + 1))))
        }
        return Array(copy.suffix(n))
    }
}

Usage:

let digits = Array(0...9)  // [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
let pick3digits = digits[randomPick: 3]  // [8, 9, 0]
1
  • You are very welcome, thank you for your algorithm ! Tried the fix, works like a charm. Also, I was convinced that I was running Swift 3.2 (Xcode 8.3.3) Swift version flag only lets me choose between "Swift 3" and "Unspecified". However, a quick swift --version in terminal prompted me with a nasty swift 3.1. Gotta find out how to force Swift 3.2 (Convert to latest swift version did not do the trick). But that's another issue.
    – H4Hugo
    Jul 15, 2017 at 13:36
5

You could define an extension on Array:

extension Array {
    func pick(_ n: Int) -> [Element] {
        guard count >= n else {
            fatalError("The count has to be at least \(n)")
        }
        guard n >= 0 else {
            fatalError("The number of elements to be picked must be positive")
        }

        let shuffledIndices = indices.shuffled().prefix(upTo: n)
        return shuffledIndices.map {self[$0]}
    }
}

[ "Peter", "Steve", "Max", "Sandra", "Roman", "Julia" ].pick(3)

If the initial array may have duplicates, and you want uniqueness in value:

extension Array where Element: Hashable {
    func pickUniqueInValue(_ n: Int) -> [Element] {
        let set: Set<Element> = Set(self)
        guard set.count >= n else {
            fatalError("The array has to have at least \(n) unique values")
        }
        guard n >= 0 else {
            fatalError("The number of elements to be picked must be positive")
        }

        return Array(set.prefix(upTo: set.index(set.startIndex, offsetBy: n)))
    }
}

[ "Peter", "Steve", "Max", "Sandra", "Roman", "Julia" ].pickUniqueInValue(3)
1
  • Not programmer, nor user, friendly to crash, better to return nil if the array has fewer elements than requested.
    – Cristik
    Apr 24, 2022 at 7:17
4

Swift 4.1 and below

let playlist = ["Nothing Else Matters", "Stairway to Heaven", "I Want to Break Free", "Yesterday"]
let index = Int(arc4random_uniform(UInt32(playlist.count)))
let song = playlist[index]

Swift 4.2 and above

if let song = playlist.randomElement() {
  print(song)
} else {
  print("Empty playlist.")
}
3

You can use the shuffle() method and pick the first 3 items of the shuffled array to get 3 random elements from the original array:

Xcode 14 • Swift 5.7

    var names: String = [ "Peter", "Steve", "Max", "Sandra", "Roman", "Julia" ]
    let shuffledNameArray = names.shuffled()
    let randomNames = Array(shuffledNameArray.prefix(3))
    print(randomNames)
1

You could also use arc4random() to just choose three elements from the Array. Something like this:

extension Array {
    func getRandomElements() -> (T, T, T) {
        return (self[Int(arc4random()) % Int(count)],
                self[Int(arc4random()) % Int(count)],
                self[Int(arc4random()) % Int(count)])
    }
}

let names = ["Peter", "Steve", "Max", "Sandra", "Roman", "Julia"]
names.getRandomElements()

This is just an example, you could also include logic in the function to get a different name for each one.

2
  • 1
    (a) You'll get modulo bias there; you should be using arc4random_uniform; (b) I reckon this may crash about half the time on 32-bit architectures, as you're putting the value of a UInt32 (the return from arc4random()) into a (signed, 32-bit) Int, resulting in a negative array index; (c) this might result in, for example, "Peter", "Steve", "Peter", as there's no code to avoid repeated picks of the same item. Dec 3, 2014 at 8:14
  • 1
    Yeah, thanks for the answer, but this really doesn't makes sure that only elements are returned once (which I didn't state directly but is what I'm looking for)
    – Patric
    Dec 3, 2014 at 8:31

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.