6

Lets suppose that I have a db table with name Employee and a respective EF 6.0 db-first model.

Getting all rows of table Employee is done through query: context.Employees.ToList()

Is it possible, at runtime and on demand, to redirect the db table name to Test1 while using the same object name and query?

Maybe a case for EF 6.0 Interceptor usage?

3
  • seems like a very odd requirement; can you explain more about what you are trying to accomplish by changing the table name? – Claies Dec 2 '14 at 22:12
  • The story behind my req is as follows: db table stores many millions of records. In order to guarantee acceptable everyday performance, I want to hold "recent" records in main table (about 1-2 million) and move through a schedule all "old" records (>100 millions in total) to a secondary identical table. The user, would be able through an application-level switch to use "historical-data" mode and switch to secondary table using exactly same model, objects and queries – GrMikeD Dec 2 '14 at 22:20
  • I am not sure if this is possible with a DB First model but I know it is possible using Code First. You can read more of my ramblings in my answer to a similar question (using Code First) here. – Jason Richmeier Dec 2 '14 at 22:28
7

I know it's been been a while since the original post, but I'll add my answer to help someone else. I had generic SQL queue tables with different table names. I.e. the schema is exactly the same for both tables. I created a framework so that you can dynamically poll the table of your choice by providing the name and that's why I needed to update the table name at run-time. Basically, you can create an interceptor to intercept the raw SQL queries from entity framework and update the table name from there.

public class MyInterceptor : IDbCommandInterceptor
{
    private const string TableReplaceString = "[TheTableNameToReplace]";

    private void ReplaceTableName(DbCommand command, IEnumerable<DbContext> contexts)
    {
        var myContext = contexts?.FirstOrDefault(x => x is MyContext) as MyContext;
        if (myContext != null && command != null && command.CommandText.Contains(TableReplaceString))
        {
            command.CommandText = command.CommandText.Replace(TableReplaceString, $"[{myContext.NewTableName}]");
        }
    }

    public void NonQueryExecuting(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<int> interceptionContext)
    {
        ReplaceTableName(command, interceptionContext.DbContexts);
    }

    public void NonQueryExecuted(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<int> interceptionContext)
    {
        ReplaceTableName(command, interceptionContext.DbContexts);
    }

    public void ReaderExecuting(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<DbDataReader> interceptionContext)
    {
        ReplaceTableName(command, interceptionContext.DbContexts);
    }

    public void ReaderExecuted(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<DbDataReader> interceptionContext)
    {
        ReplaceTableName(command, interceptionContext.DbContexts);
    }

    public void ScalarExecuting(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<object> interceptionContext)
    {
        ReplaceTableName(command, interceptionContext.DbContexts);
    }

    public void ScalarExecuted(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<object> interceptionContext)
    {
        ReplaceTableName(command, interceptionContext.DbContexts);
    }
}

Of course, you have to get the new table name from somewhere. Either from the constructor or from a stored field in your custom DBContext which you can grab from interceptionContext.DbContexts.

Then you just have to register the interceptor for your context.

public class MyContext : DBContext
{
    public readonly string NewTableName;

    public MyContext(string connectionString, string newTableName)
        : base(connectionString)
    {
        NewTableName = newTableName;
        // Set interceptor
        DbInterception.Add(new MyInterceptor());
    }
}

UPDATE: I found that if you add the interceptor in the constructor above will cause memory leaks. DotMemory doesn't tell you about this. Make sure you add the interceptor in a static constructor instead.

public class MyContext : DBContext
{
    public readonly string NewTableName;

    static MyContext()
    {
        // Set interceptor only in static constructor
        DbInterception.Add(new MyInterceptor());
    }

    public MyContext(string connectionString, string newTableName)
        : base(connectionString)
    {
        NewTableName = newTableName;
    }
}
2
  • And what would be the QueueMessageInterceptor()? – kjrkvc Jan 24 '20 at 10:19
  • Sorry this was a copy and paste issue. It should be your interceptor implementation. In this example, it would be "MyInterceptor." I will update my example. – Eric Chhun Jan 25 '20 at 18:38
1

I would do something like this:

public partial class MyContext : DbContext
{
    private readonly ITableNameProvider _tableNameProvider;

    public MyContext(ITableNameProvider tableNameProvider)
        : base("name=ConnectionStringName")
    {
        _tableNameProvider = tableNameProvider;
    }

    public virtual DbSet<MyGenericEntity> Templates { get; set; }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Entity<MyGenericEntity>()
            .ToTable(_tableNameProvider.GetTableName(), _tableNameProvider.GetSchemaName());
    }

}

I think it works in your scenario. The only problem would be OnModelCreating() is run once. Therefore if you use it in the same application, it'll take the first table name since it caches the result.

0

I don't know if you should do that, but I think you can. You will have to dig into Entity Framework metadata structures, like MetadataWorkspace, which you can get from the underlying ObjectContext. See an example here: http://weblogs.asp.net/ricardoperes/entity-framework-metadata.

1
  • For what its worth, you can get at the metadata as you have described, but you cannot change the table mapping via this route (I already tried). Despite the property being a read-write property, there is an internal mechanism that identifies it as read-only and throws an exception when you try to change it. – Jason Richmeier Dec 3 '14 at 13:53
0

Thanks for the answers.

I think that my case is a real-world scenario that is, typically neglected in all "getting-started" typical scenarios of EF tutorials and examples.

Based on the fact that I use db-first approach and the switch should be at the application level, I think that I will create a Context instance, based on different SSDL with the new table name that the user will use on demand

0

Old question, but based on the problem I would suggest that you look at partioning your table based on a "current" bit or a datetime field. Partitioning is based on a column value & is supported by most modern DBMS. It would avoid issue at the ORM level.

0

You must create a new dbcontext that inherits from the db-first model context and treat it like code-first in ef. Check the link, please. Same problem as yours.

https://www.codeproject.com/Articles/421643/How-to-Use-MVC-Net-on-the-Dynamics-NAV-Database-St#_articleTop

So when mapping, you can get the table name dynamically.

-2

Why not use some good old fashioned polymorphism?

partial class Employee : IEmployee { }
partial class HistoricalEmployee : IEmployee { }

interface IEmployee {
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

void PrintEmployeeName(IEmployee employee)
{
    Debug.WriteLine(employee.Name);
}

PrintEmployeeName(context.Employees.First());
PrintEmployeeName(context.HistoricalEmployees.First());

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