4

I have a map with a pair<int, int> as key and a third integer as value. How can I iterate over the map's keys in order to print them? My example code is pasted below:

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

int main ()
{
  map <pair<int, int>, int> my_map;
  pair <int, int> my_pair;

  my_pair = make_pair(1, 2);
  my_map[my_pair] = 3;

  // My attempt on iteration
  for(map<pair<int,int>,int>::iterator it = my_map.begin(); it != my_map.end(); ++it) {
    cout << it->first << "\n";
  }

  return 0;
}

How do I have to modify the cout line, so that it works?

  • What do you want to do? – Vlad from Moscow Dec 3 '14 at 20:37
  • What is your question? (BTW: There is no overload taking ostream&, pair<X,Y>.) Works when printing it->first.first instead: coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/686ef9dc8e2f05c0 – Deduplicator Dec 3 '14 at 20:38
  • @VladfromMoscow: I want to iterate over keys and print them. – Andrej Dec 3 '14 at 20:42
  • As an aside, a range-for would be nicer: for(auto&& x : my_map) cout << x.first.first << ' ' << x.first.second << '\n'; – Deduplicator Dec 3 '14 at 20:43
3

Well, map Key is first item, but itself it is a pair

So

pair<int,int>& key(*it);
cout << key.first << " " << key.second << "\n";

might do the trick

|improve this answer|||||
5

it->first is an object of type const std::pair<int, int> that is it is the key. it->second is an object of type int that is it is the mapped value. If you want simply to output the key and the mapped value you could write

for ( map<pair<int,int>,int>::iterator it = my_map.begin(); it != my_map.end(); ++it ) 
{
    cout << "( " << it->first.first << ", " 
                 << it->first.second 
                 << " ): "
                 << it->second
                 << std::endl;
}

Or you could use the range-based for statement

for ( const auto &p : my_map )
{
    cout << "( " << p.first.first << ", " 
                 << p.first.second 
                 << " ): "
                 << p.second
                 << std::endl;
}
|improve this answer|||||
2

Do you have access to c++11, the auto keyword can make it look a lot nicer. I compiled and ran this fine.

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <algorithm>

    using namespace std;

    int main ()
    {
      map <pair<int, int>, int> my_map;
      pair <int, int> my_pair;

      my_pair = make_pair(1, 2);
      my_map[my_pair] = 3;

      // My attempt on iteration
      for(auto it = my_map.begin(); it != my_map.end(); ++it) {
        cout << it->first.first << "\n";
      }

      return 0;
    }
|improve this answer|||||
  • A range based for can make it look even better :) – Praetorian Dec 3 '14 at 20:41
1
#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    map <pair<int, int>, int> my_map;
    pair <int, int> my_pair;

    my_pair = make_pair(1, 2);
    my_map[my_pair] = 3;

    // My attempt on iteration
    for (map<pair<int, int>, int>::iterator it = my_map.begin(); it != my_map.end(); ++it) {
        cout << it->first.first << "\n";
        cout << it->first.second << "\n";
    }

    return 0;
}
|improve this answer|||||
0

By default, std::ostream does not know how to deal with std::pair. So, if you want to print your keys, the easiest way is to directly access their two elements, as also shown in the other answers. However, if you have access to C++11 features, then you can also use a range-based for loop for iterating over your map as follows:

int main() {
    std::map<std::pair<int, int>, int> my_map{ {{1, 2}, 3}, {{4, 5}, 6}, {{7, 8}, 9} };

    for (auto const &kv : my_map)
        std::cout << "(" << kv.first.first << ", " << kv.first.second << ") = " << kv.second << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

Output:

(1, 2) = 3
(4, 5) = 6
(7, 8) = 9

If you can use C++17, then you can further shorten the code by using structured binding in the range-based for loop as follow:

for (auto const &[k, v] : my_map)
    std::cout << "(" << k.first << ", " << k.second << ") = " << v << std::endl;

Code on Coliru

|improve this answer|||||

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.