52

I want to do this:

var orderBy = "Nome, Cognome desc";

var timb = time.Timbratures.Include("Anagrafica_Dipendente")
    .Where(p => p.CodDipendente == 1);

if(orderBy != "")
    timb = timb.OrderBy(orderBy);

Is there an OrderBy overload available that accepts a string parameter?

41

Absolutely. You can use the LINQ Dynamic Query Library, found on Scott Guthrie's blog. There's also an updated version available on CodePlex.

It lets you create OrderBy clauses, Where clauses, and just about everything else by passing in string parameters. It works great for creating generic code for sorting/filtering grids, etc.

var result = data
    .Where(/* ... */)
    .Select(/* ... */)
    .OrderBy("Foo asc");

var query = DbContext.Data
    .Where(/* ... */)
    .Select(/* ... */)
    .OrderBy("Foo ascending");
  • 3
    Is there any security issues with this? As in LINQ injection, would it be unsafe to allow user input into the OrderBy field? e.g .OrderBy("UserInput ascending"). – jthomperoo Jun 9 '17 at 14:55
  • This is available as a Nuget package for those interested – ElliotSchmelliot Feb 27 '18 at 19:39
  • @jthomperoo, you should always validate the user input here. It is trivial. – Dima Dec 5 '18 at 20:50
65

If you are using plain LINQ-to-objects and don't want to take a dependency on an external library it is not hard to achieve what you want.

The OrderBy() clause accepts a Func<TSource, TKey> that gets a sort key from a source element. You can define the function outside the OrderBy() clause:

Func<Item, Object> orderByFunc = null;

You can then assign it to different values depending on the sort criteria:

if (sortOrder == SortOrder.SortByName)
  orderByFunc = item => item.Name;
else if (sortOrder == SortOrder.SortByRank)
  orderByFunc = item => item.Rank;

Then you can sort:

var sortedItems = items.OrderBy(orderByFunc);

This example assumes that the source type is Item that have properties Name and Rank.

Note that in this example TKey is Object to not constrain the property types that can be sorted on. If the func returns a value type (like Int32) it will get boxed when sorting and that is somewhat inefficient. If you can constrain TKey to a specific value type you can work around this problem.

  • 3
    Clean, great answer, the TKey was what was confusing me and I assumed it was defined higher up the chain and couldn't be stamped so easily. I've been using the DynLinq resolution for some time. Thanks for this. – Dave Jellison Dec 8 '12 at 22:12
  • If I need the first dynamic order to be descending, and the second one to be ascending - is there a trick for that? – Yuval A. Jul 23 '14 at 15:43
  • 2
    @YuvalA.: If one of the properties is numeric (this includes DateTime.Ticks) you can negate the value to sort in the opposite order. Otherwise you can use OrderBy or OrderByDescending conditionally: var sortedItems = reverse ? items.OrderByDescending(orderByFunc) : items.OrderBy(orderByFunc). – Martin Liversage Jul 25 '14 at 11:07
  • for each property I need to add an if condition? – juanora Oct 23 '18 at 9:59
29

Another solution from codeConcussion (https://stackoverflow.com/a/7265394/2793768)

var param = "Address";    
var pi = typeof(Student).GetProperty(param);    
var orderByAddress = items.OrderBy(x => pi.GetValue(x, null));
  • 4
    This doesnt work in Linq to Entity Framework as it throws this error LINQ to Entities does not recognize the method 'System.Object GetValue(System.Object, System.Object[])' method, and this method cannot be translated into a store expression. – Korayem Jan 28 '16 at 14:41
  • with that error, could u try: var orderByAddress = items.AsEnumerable().OrderBy(x => propertyInfo.GetValue(x, null)) – Chinh Phan Feb 16 '16 at 6:39
  • 2
    Not a good thing if he wants to paginate the results. Such pagination would come after the OrderBy with Skip() and Take()... – Abílio Esteves Oct 31 '16 at 19:59
14

You don't need an external library for this. The below code works for LINQ to SQL/entities.

    /// <summary>
    /// Sorts the elements of a sequence according to a key and the sort order.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="TSource">The type of the elements of <paramref name="query" />.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="query">A sequence of values to order.</param>
    /// <param name="key">Name of the property of <see cref="TSource"/> by which to sort the elements.</param>
    /// <param name="ascending">True for ascending order, false for descending order.</param>
    /// <returns>An <see cref="T:System.Linq.IOrderedQueryable`1" /> whose elements are sorted according to a key and sort order.</returns>
    public static IQueryable<TSource> OrderBy<TSource>(this IQueryable<TSource> query, string key, bool ascending = true)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(key))
        {
            return query;
        }

        var lambda = (dynamic)CreateExpression(typeof(TSource), key);

        return ascending 
            ? Queryable.OrderBy(query, lambda) 
            : Queryable.OrderByDescending(query, lambda);
    }

    private static LambdaExpression CreateExpression(Type type, string propertyName)
    {
        var param = Expression.Parameter(type, "x");

        Expression body = param;
        foreach (var member in propertyName.Split('.'))
        {
            body = Expression.PropertyOrField(body, member);
        }

        return Expression.Lambda(body, param);
    }

(CreateExpression copied from https://stackoverflow.com/a/16208620/111438)

  • I confirm this works, but it doesn't work when TSource is private class – Liero Feb 21 at 15:48
8

The simplest & the best solution:

mylist.OrderBy(s => s.GetType().GetProperty("PropertyName").GetValue(s));
  • are you sure this has not syntax error??? – Navid_pdp11 Jul 10 '16 at 11:17
  • add using System.Linq; – Kasper Roma Jul 10 '16 at 14:30
  • 1
    This probably won’t work with IQueryable. – Daniel B Feb 16 '17 at 9:07
6

Look at this blog here. It describes a way to do this, by defining an EntitySorter<T>.

It allows you to pass in an IEntitySorter<T> into your service methods and use it like this:

public static Person[] GetAllPersons(IEntitySorter<Person> sorter)
{
    using (var db = ContextFactory.CreateContext())
    {
        IOrderedQueryable<Person> sortedList = sorter.Sort(db.Persons);

        return sortedList.ToArray();
    }
}

And you can create an EntitiySorter like this:

IEntitySorter<Person> sorter = EntitySorter<Person>
    .OrderBy(p => p.Name)
    .ThenByDescending(p => p.Id);

Or like this:

var sorter = EntitySorter<Person>
     .OrderByDescending("Address.City")
     .ThenBy("Id");
  • Great answer - encapsulating the sorting in its own class is a reusable and flexible solution – AlexFoxGill Feb 26 '16 at 9:41
6

I did so:

using System.Linq.Expressions;

namespace System.Linq
{
    public static class LinqExtensions
    {

        public static IOrderedQueryable<TSource> OrderBy<TSource>(this IQueryable<TSource> source, string field, string dir = "asc")
        {
            // parametro => expressão
            var parametro = Expression.Parameter(typeof(TSource), "r");
            var expressao = Expression.Property(parametro, field);
            var lambda = Expression.Lambda(expressao, parametro); // r => r.AlgumaCoisa
            var tipo = typeof(TSource).GetProperty(field).PropertyType;

            var nome = "OrderBy";
            if (string.Equals(dir, "desc", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase))
            {
                nome = "OrderByDescending";
            }
            var metodo = typeof(Queryable).GetMethods().First(m => m.Name == nome && m.GetParameters().Length == 2);
            var metodoGenerico = metodo.MakeGenericMethod(new[] { typeof(TSource), tipo });
            return metodoGenerico.Invoke(source, new object[] { source, lambda }) as IOrderedQueryable<TSource>;

        }

        public static IOrderedQueryable<TSource> ThenBy<TSource>(this IOrderedQueryable<TSource> source, string field, string dir = "asc")
        {
            var parametro = Expression.Parameter(typeof(TSource), "r");
            var expressao = Expression.Property(parametro, field);
            var lambda = Expression.Lambda<Func<TSource, string>>(expressao, parametro); // r => r.AlgumaCoisa
            var tipo = typeof(TSource).GetProperty(field).PropertyType;

            var nome = "ThenBy";
            if (string.Equals(dir, "desc", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase))
            {
                nome = "ThenByDescending";
            }

            var metodo = typeof(Queryable).GetMethods().First(m => m.Name == nome && m.GetParameters().Length == 2);
            var metodoGenerico = metodo.MakeGenericMethod(new[] { typeof(TSource), tipo });
            return metodoGenerico.Invoke(source, new object[] { source, lambda }) as IOrderedQueryable<TSource>;
        }

    }
}

Use :

example.OrderBy("Nome", "desc").ThenBy("other")

Work like:

example.OrderByDescending(r => r.Nome).ThenBy(r => r.other)
  • 1
    By using Expression.Lambda<Func<TSource, string>> you expect that the property is a string type – juanora Oct 25 '18 at 10:13
  • You're right, when I did the code I used it just for strings. I edited to work with other types too. – Gustavo Rossi Muller Oct 26 '18 at 12:52
  • How can you make the method to work for other types. Do you have an example? – coolswastik Apr 1 at 18:02
4

You need to use the LINQ Dynamic Query Library in order to pass parameters at runtime,

This will allow linq statements like

string orderedBy = "Description";
var query = (from p in products
            orderby(orderedBy)
            select p);
-2

In one answer above:

The simplest & the best solution:

mylist.OrderBy(s => s.GetType().GetProperty("PropertyName").GetValue(s));

There is an syntax error, ,null must be added:

mylist.OrderBy(s => s.GetType().GetProperty("PropertyName").GetValue(s,null));
  • 2
    This should be a comment at @Kasper Roma. – Eiko Oct 3 '16 at 9:36

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