11

I'm trying to remove numbers in the end of a given string.

AB123 -> AB
123ABC79 -> 123ABC

I've tried something like this;

string input = "123ABC79";
string pattern = @"^\\d+|\\d+$";
string replacement = "";
Regex rgx = new Regex(pattern);
string result = rgx.Replace(input, replacement);

Yet the replacement string is same as the input. I'm not very familiar with regex. I can simply split the string into a character array, and loop over it to get it done, but it does not feel like a good solution. What is a good practice to remove numbers that are only in the end of a string?

Thanks in advance.

  • 10
    The developer has a problem. He knows he can solve it by a regular expression. Now he has two problems. – Oliver Dec 4 '14 at 8:12
  • I've heard the saying multiple times, and I understand the point it makes. But what would you suggest instead of regex for this issue? Looping over a character array feels more dirty. – tdgtyugdyugdrugdr Dec 4 '14 at 8:18
  • 2
    Maybe it feels more dirty, but under the hood a RegEx does nothing more. And maintaining a (maybe complex) regular expression is much more dirty then express the same in a simple loop. I don't want to say: "Never use RegEx.", but you should maybe use them only if you really need to and also maybe add a big comment with an explanation of the RegEx, cause it tends to be write only code. Ah, and before I forget: Write a unit test for that method that will be tackled with a lots of different string (maybe through a TestCaseSource) to ensure you won't break anything in the future. – Oliver Dec 4 '14 at 8:27
  • Thank you for the clarification Oliver, especially the unit test advice is very sound. – tdgtyugdyugdrugdr Dec 4 '14 at 8:31
12

Try this:

string input = "123ABC79";
string pattern = @"\d+$";
string replacement = "";
Regex rgx = new Regex(pattern);
string result = rgx.Replace(input, replacement);

Putting the $ at the end will restrict searches to numeric substrings at the end. Then, since we are calling Regex.Replace, we need to pass in the replacement pattern as the second parameter.

Demo

  • 1
    Thank you, this covers all the bases. – tdgtyugdyugdrugdr Dec 4 '14 at 8:27
  • This can be done in one line: string result = Regex.Replace("123ABC79", @"\d+$", ""); – Polyfun Jul 17 '18 at 15:41
29

String.TrimEnd() is faster than using a regex:

var digits = new[] { '0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9' };
var input = "123ABC79";
var result = input.TrimEnd(digits);

Benchmark app:

    string input = "123ABC79";
    string pattern = @"\d+$";
    string replacement = "";
    Regex rgx = new Regex(pattern);

    var iterations = 1000000;
    var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
    {
        rgx.Replace(input, replacement);
    }

    sw.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("regex:\t{0}", sw.ElapsedTicks);

    var digits = new[] { '0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9' };
    sw.Restart();
    for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
    {
        input.TrimEnd(digits);
    }

    sw.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("trim:\t{0}", sw.ElapsedTicks);

Result:

regex:  40052843
trim:   2000635
2

try this:

string input = "123ABC79";
string pattern = @".+\D+(?=\d+)";
Match match = Regex.Match(input, pattern);
string result = match.Value;

but you also can use a simple cycle:

string input = "123ABC79";
int i = input.Length - 1;
for (; i > 0 && char.IsDigit(input[i - 1]); i--)
{}
string result = input.Remove(i);
  • Thank you very much Alex, this works perfectly! – tdgtyugdyugdrugdr Dec 4 '14 at 8:15
  • 1
    Note, though, that this does not do what has been asked: It does not remove numbers at the end of the input, it selects the first digits-nondigits sequence from the input! – Heinzi Dec 4 '14 at 8:18
  • @Heinzi i know, but I suggest it is what TS is actualy needed, but didn't describe well – Alex Zhukovskiy Dec 4 '14 at 8:20
  • @Heinzi It solved my problem as 'the first digits-nondigits sequence' is what I needed in my case, but you are right, this won't work for a more complex combination of chars/numbers. Thanks for the heads up. – tdgtyugdyugdrugdr Dec 4 '14 at 8:23
  • @Davlumbaz okay, see edited answer for any sequence. I think it's better because do not use slow replace. – Alex Zhukovskiy Dec 4 '14 at 8:28
1

you can use this:

string strInput = textBox1.Text;
textBox2.Text = strInput.TrimEnd(new char[] { '0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9' });

I got it from this post: Simple get string (ignore numbers at end) in C#

0
 (? <=[A-Za-z]*)\d*

Should parse it

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