I have a java application with the following project structure:

myProject
  |
  |----src
  |     |
  |     |--main
  |     |
  |     |--resources
  |           |   
  |           |--userConfig.properties
  |           |--log4j.properties
  |
  |---target

I am using Maven to build my project. I am using maven command to build jar file as follows:

mvn package -DMaven.test.skip=true

I want to exclude userConfig.properties file from my JAR file so I have updated my pom.xml as follows:

<excludes>
    <exclude>**/userConfig.properties</exclude>
</excludes>

But it excludes from the target folder in which the compiled code resides. And the application won't run because it is unable to find the userConfig.properties file.

Can anyone help me?

  • Your question is not making any sense. You say that you want to exclude a file, but then you say that your app doesn't work because the file is excluded. So why did you want to exclude it in the first place? – Stephen C Apr 28 '10 at 11:50
  • Are you using the Spring framework? – Chris J Apr 28 '10 at 12:00
  • Yes,Chris I am using Spring Framework. – Nisarg Mehta Apr 28 '10 at 12:09
  • 1
    Stephen,I am making jar file of my application with the use of Maven command which will generate target folder which will contain the code that will run my application.I want to exclude userConfig file from myProject.jar ,so that whenever user need he can change some properties value irrrespective of jar file.And i have included it in my project. – Nisarg Mehta Apr 28 '10 at 12:41

I encountered this scenario as well. Basically, you want to be able to run your code locally from Eclipse using some userConfig.properties file that is readily accessible, such as inside /src/main/resources. Additionally, you want to provide a compiled executable JAR with an external userConfig.properties that allows the user to configure the application without cracking the JAR.

My implementation is as follows: running mvn clean install will:

  • create executable JAR with the specified mainClass
  • exclude all .properties files located in src/main/resources from the JAR
  • copy project dependencies into a lib folder in your project root
  • copy all .properties files located in src/main/resources into a conf folder in your project root. Note that this step is an optional convenience for your users of the JAR. You can require the explicitly create this file in the conf directory. This conf directory is effectively added to your runtime classpath via the manifest.
  • add this conf folder to the manifest, providing access to it from your executable JAR

Using these Maven plugins in conjunction with each other in your POM configuration will give you what you need. As to the "best practices" of this solution; I'm not sure.

Using maven-dependency-plugin as follows:

<plugin>
  <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
  <artifactId>maven-dependency-plugin</artifactId>
  <executions>
    <execution>
      <id>copy-dependencies</id>
      <phase>prepare-package</phase>
      <goals>
        <goal>copy-dependencies</goal>
      </goals>
      <configuration>
        <outputDirectory>${project.build.directory}/lib</outputDirectory>
        <overWriteReleases>false</overWriteReleases>
        <overWriteSnapshots>false</overWriteSnapshots>
        <overWriteIfNewer>true</overWriteIfNewer>
      </configuration>
    </execution>
  </executions>
</plugin>

Using maven-jar-plugin as follows:

<plugin>
  <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
  <artifactId>maven-jar-plugin</artifactId>
  <version>2.3</version>
  <configuration>
    <excludes>
      <exclude>**/*.properties</exclude>
    </excludes>                    
    <archive>
      <manifest>
        <addClasspath>true</addClasspath>
        <classpathPrefix>lib/</classpathPrefix>
        <mainClass>package.path.to.your.main.class.MainClass</mainClass>
      </manifest>
      <manifestEntries>
        <Class-Path>conf/</Class-Path>
      </manifestEntries>
    </archive>
  </configuration>
</plugin>

Using maven-resources-plugin as follows:

<plugin>
  <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
  <artifactId>maven-resources-plugin</artifactId>
  <version>2.3</version>
  <executions>
    <execution>
      <id>copy-resources</id>
      <phase>install</phase>
      <goals>
        <goal>copy-resources</goal>
      </goals>
      <configuration>
        <outputDirectory>${basedir}/target/conf</outputDirectory>
        <resources>
          <resource>
            <directory>src/main/resources</directory>
            <includes>
              <include>**/*.properties</include>
            </includes>
          </resource>
        </resources>
      </configuration>
    </execution>
  </executions>
</plugin>

Using this project setup, I can run in Eclipse using one config, and provide my users a properties file to configure, without properties stepping on each other.

  • 1
    Thank you for your solution! You save my life!!! – Jan Bouchner May 12 '14 at 11:11
  • I like the idea of executable jar with properly set classpath. Maybe you can check Maven Assembly Plugin also - I used that to create deliverable zip with same structure as you have (with exception, that my jar is not executable..yet (-; ) - so you can achieve the same, by replacing resources and dependency plugins with assembly... – Betlista Jan 14 '15 at 12:16
  • 1
    THIS.IS.A.LIFESAVER. – jmcg Jan 19 '16 at 2:58
  • this is the best solution for the use case – Babu James Sep 30 at 3:40

You shoud take a look at this.

<project>
  ...
  <build>
    <plugins>
      ...
      <plugin>
        <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
        <artifactId>maven-jar-plugin</artifactId>
        <version>2.3</version>
        <configuration>
          <excludes>
            <exclude>**/userConfig.properties</exclude>
          </excludes>
        </configuration>
      </plugin>
      ...
    </plugins>
  </build>
  ...
</project>

I think you're probably already doing it correctly, depending on where you configured that exclude (check with jar tf what files really are in your jar). Most likely, you're running into trouble because the file is not on your classpath and thus your app can't find it. Try adding the directory with the resources file in it to the classpath.

You might want to put in some defaults and let the application read in its configuration from a predefined path, to avoid having to mess with the classpath.

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